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October 2019
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Women at Work Survey

The Great Gender Debate

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

The weekend newspapers have again been full of the gender debate about how men and women are faring relative to each other, especially in the workplace but also in education, relationships, lifestyle and ambitions.

 

A lot of this commentary has been triggered by two books that showcase the evidence for why women’s development and progress is outpacing men’s, and then go on to suggest what this could mean for our future.

 

The main basis for the arguments in The Richer Sex (by Liza Mundy) and The End of Men (by Hanna Rosin) is that girls are doing better than boys in education, and then go on to enter higher-paying professions in greater numbers than men. In turn, this pattern means that women have increasing economic freedom, and with that, increasing choice over how they live their lives and who they live them with.

 

Increasing autonomy and choice are good for any human being, especially for people who have been in situations where combinations of circumstances have deprived them of this. But it’s a dangerous assumption to think that all women will want the same things as men are perceived to have traditionally wanted – such as a place on the board or a high-powered role with all the pressures and responsibilities – and sacrifices – that accompany it.

 

Through our Women at Work Survey, we’re striving to understand the real drivers for women in the modern age. What do you want from work as a woman? What are the things that have shaped your career and development to date? What do you want to achieve in the future? Who do you learn from and aspire to be like?

 

It’s our view that many women’s voices have not yet been heard, being drowned out by the clamour for putting more women on the board. Let me be clear – I support this – but I also support the right of any person to decide that this isn’t what they want, and to choose an alternative path instead.

 

We would love to hear about your experiences and aspirations as a woman at work, so please join us in completing the Capp Women at Work Survey. As a thank you to all our participants, we are offering a prize draw for an iPad 3 and three runner-up prizes of a Spa Day.

 

Please help us understand more about what women want from work by sharing the survey link with others.

 

You can also let us know your own thoughts on women at work and in leadership by posting your Comments on The Capp Blog below.

 

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Five Things You Didn’t Know About Women at Work

Posted by: Alex Linley & Nicky Garcea

 

Over the last few days we have been reviewing the UN report on The World’s Women 2010: Trends and Statistics. This report is produced every five years, following the Beijing Declaration adopted in 1995 at the Fourth World Conference on Women.

 

As we’re currently running the Capp Women at Work Survey focused at the individual level (you can complete the survey here), we have also been looking at trends and statistics at the international and national policy level.

 

Here are five things you probably didn’t know about women at work:

 

1. Women’s participation in the global labour market has been steady at about 52% from 1990 through to 2010, whereas men’s participation has declined from 81% to 77%.

 

2. Women spend at least twice as much time as men on unpaid domestic work, leaving them with total work hours that are longer than men’s in all regions of the world.

 

3. Relative to their overall share of total employment, you’re significantly less likely to find a woman as a legislator, senior official or manager, and much more likely to find a woman as a clerk, sales worker or service worker.

 

4. Following from this, more than three quarters of women’s employment in most of the developed world is in the service sector – a significantly higher proportion than men’s employment, although this is increasing for both genders.

 

5. And this looks unlikely to change soon: Based on participation in tertiary (university / college) education, women are predominant in the fields of education, health and welfare, social sciences, and humanities and art, but they are significantly under-represented in science and engineering.

 

The World’s Women 2010: Trends and Statistics gives us a macro-level view of what is happening for women in the world of work and beyond.

 

If you’d like to help us understand more about what is happening for individual women at the micro-level, please join us in completing the Capp Women at Work Survey. In this survey, we are interested in understanding more about why as a woman you do what you do at work, your achievements, your career progression and role models, the advice you may need, your learning and the legacy you would want to see for other women.

 

As a thank you to all the women who complete the Women at Work Survey, we will enter you into our prize draw for an iPad 3 or three runner up prizes of a Spa Day. We will also give all our respondents a sneak preview of our findings and results before they are published more widely.

 

We’re keen to collect responses from as diverse a working female population as possible – so we invite and encourage you to pass on this invitation to your female colleagues, friends and family as widely as possible. Thank you – we appreciate it!

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The Women at Work Survey

Posted by: Alex Linley & Nicky Garcea

 

Following on from Female Leaders Month on The Capp Blog, in August we launched Capp’s Women at Work Survey – and if you’re a working woman, we’d love to invite your participation. You can still access the Women at Work Survey here.

 

We are interested in understanding more about why as a woman you do what you do at work, your achievements, your career progression and role models, the advice you may need, your learning and the legacy you would want to see for other women.

 

As a thank you to all the women who complete the Women at Work Survey, we will enter you into our prize draw for an iPad 3 or three runner up prizes of a Spa Day. We will also give all our respondents a sneak preview of our findings and results before they are published more widely.

 

Thank you – we’re keen to collect responses from as diverse a working female population as possible – so please pass on this invitation to your female colleagues, friends and family as widely as possible.

 

We appreciate it!

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An Invitation to all Working Women – The Women at Work Survey

Posted by: Alex Linley & Nicky Garcea

 

Following on from Female Leaders Month on The Capp Blog, we are delighted to launch Capp’s Women at Work Survey – and if you’re a working woman, we’d love to invite your participation. You can access the Women at Work Survey here.

 

We are interested in understanding more about why as a woman you do what you do at work, your achievements, your career progression and role models, the advice you may need, your learning and the legacy you would want to see for other women.

 

As a thank you to all the women who complete the Women at Work Survey, we will enter you into our prize draw for an iPad 3 or three runner up prizes of a Spa Day. We will also give all our respondents a sneak preview of our findings and results before they are published more widely.

 

Thank you – we’re keen to collect responses from as diverse a working female population as possible – so please pass on this invitation to your female colleagues, friends and family as widely as possible.

 

We appreciate it!

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