Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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October 2019
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unrealised strengths

As Spring Reveals Itself, So Can Your Unrealised Strengths

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Development Consultant, Capp

 

I posted a recent blog saying that unrealised strengths were like the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. I am feeling a little like that about the arrival of Spring in the UK this week – it is simply gold!

 

For those that haven’t taken Realise2 yet, and who don’t know your unrealised strengths, think about what strengths have served you well in the past but are a little dusty now. Or identify the areas for which you have energy in growing and developing.

 

As the name suggests, we are not currently using these strengths – that’s what makes them unrealised – so they may be a little harder to uncover. As such, ask others where they have seen you perform well before, or keep a diary of the things you would love to do. All of these provide clues for where your unrealised strengths might lay.

 

So, let us take a moment as we enjoy the growth of our gardens, to think also about our own growth and how best to polish the pot of gold that is our unrealised strengths.

 

  • The best place to start is by looking at the unrealised strengths in your Realise2 profile and recognising where you get an instant buzz. Which ones could you happily keep where they are (for now!) and which are you thinking, ‘Ummm, I have always wanted to…’ I confess to not getting excited about my own unrealised strength of Order, but where there is a need, it is a good friend. However, I could easily bore you all when I talk about my love of my Creativity or Optimism.

 

  • Next, think about any opportunities coming up at work where there may be a perfect opportunity to put yourself forward.  What tasks or projects could you become involved in and add a touch of inspiration for the benefit of others? Take a risk and don’t worry if your strengths are different to the others on the project team; you will be able to make a valuable difference as you introduce new qualities to the team mix.

 

  • Don’t forget about home life too. Which unrealised strengths are waiting for your hobby to begin at last? Can you use these unrealised strengths to teach the kids something new?

 

  • Do any of these unrealised strengths need a helping hand? Sometimes they can be unrealised due to a need to up-skill ourselves, or maybe more practice is required. Learn from role models and start being curious about their successes (see Jonathan and Alex’s blog on social learning). Practise their advice / what they did. Ask for feedback. It all helps in building your own experience and momentum.

 

Above all, be confident in your abilities. By using your strengths, you’re far more likely to be performing well and also from a place of happiness and passion; you just need to find the purpose and put your unrealised strengths to work.

 

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Spring Forward! Five Ways to Get More Energy

Posted by: Emma Trenier, Senior Psychologist, Capp

 

March in the UK was very un-spring-like, with the enduring snow and cool temperatures. It’s no wonder that everyone seemed a little under the weather.

 

So, with clocks having gone forward last weekend, what can you do to put a spring in your step?

 

1. Take time out from energy sappers - we all spend time with some people who make us feel great and others who sap our energy. If you are already feeling low, take a break from the interactions and situations where you know you will leave feeling worse than when you arrive.

 

2. Find a different way to tackle draining tasks - if the approach you are taking isn’t working, don’t keep doing it. Seek the exception to the rule, a time when you found a similar task enjoyable. Why was this occasion different? Could you do it this way again?

 

3.   Stop mulling over things that have gone wrong – when we do something wrong or make a mistake, many of us are inclined to dwell on it. We might think it is our fault, we won’t be able to change and the consequences will be dire. Instead, take a leaf out of the optimists’ book and try considering the other factors involved. What can you do to put it right? Put the consequences into perspective.

 

4.   Celebrate other people’s good news – relationship researchers tell us that active responding versus passive responding is beneficial to relationships when things go wrong in people’s lives and also when they go right. When someone greets you with their good news, why not ask them to tell you more, share their happiness with them and capitalise on the moment.

 

5.   Use your unrealised strengths - discover what your unrealised strengths are by taking Realise2 or asking yourself what you are good at and enjoy doing but don’t do very much. Find a way to do it more. For example, if you have an unrealised strength in Courage, challenge yourself to do something scary every day – or at least every week!

 

Put these tips into practice and feel the energy start to flow. After all, summer is just around the corner!

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Overcoming Challenges, Maximising Unrealised Strengths

Posted by: Avirupa Bhaduri & Alex Linley

 

This month Avirupa shares some of her personal insights about how she has been using her own strengths and strengthspotting skills to help her through the challenging time of moving house and getting everything organised. Everything worked out well in the end when she looked to maximise her unrealised strengths and draw on the strengths of the Shiriti Women’s Sewing Co-operative to help her…

 

“February started with an exceptionally hectic schedule, personally. I have recently shifted home and there are a million things that needed attention and tons of new things that needed to be adjusted to. This proved to be a major stressor, and was seriously affecting my relations with my family. So I decided to sit down and try to apply Realise2 to see if I can turn this into a positive experience.

 

I know I like adventure, I am creative, I have empathic connection. My weakness is order, lack of planfulness, being low on detail. Next, instead of learned behaviour I tried to focus on my unrealised strengths in this context. I asked my daughter what she misses most about me these days.

 

Back came the reply “You always smiled hugged and kissed me every time after you scolded me for my mistakes, and you soon forgot all about it, when anything went wrong! Now you are always angry and complaining.” Bounceback was instantly on my mind. I hugged and kissed her for that!

 

I asked my husband next. He surprised me by saying I am less thankful and optimistic these days, which is unusual of me. He also said something interesting, he said “You know you are creative but do you know that you are a great manager, you know how to get things done by people and you know exactly who is best for what.” Drive and connector that’s me!!! It brought a smile to my face.

 

Armed with this illumination, I took it on me to start small to improve my life for myself and my family. I had a long conversation with my husband about the good things of this decision, about sharing chores and making work done systematically. He is a time optimiser and super-great in order, so he agreed to complement me in this regard. My optimism was once more restored.

 

I had a number of pending odd jobs, that was weighing down on me, one of which was making curtains for our new home. Suddenly I thought why not give it to Mousumi & Sharmila, instead of a tailor shop. It will be a win-win situation for both of us!

 

Next week at Shiriti I came with my bundle of fabric, and my friends happily lapped up the opportunity. We had a hearty chatter about my new home, their cheerful curiosity got transmitted to me, and soon I found myself talking happily about my plans for the time ahead. The week after, my curtains were ready, on time and looking lovely.

 

I paid them their wages after much argument on the due amount. They charged ridiculously low. I used my “strict teacher” voice to persuade them to take what is rightful and fair. As I walked back home with my curtain packet in hand, my heart was full of content and hope for the days to come, and I was thankful for the knowledge of strengths which had helped me see this.”

 

 

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