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technology

The 21 Most Powerful Women in Mobile Advertising

Posted by: Alex Linley and Nicky Garcea

 

Business Insider have just released their ranking of the 21 Most Powerful Women in Mobile Advertising: 2012.

 

We salute the Business Insider team, not least because “When we compiled our list of the most important people in mobile advertising – the Mobile Power List 2012 – it contained one depressing anomaly: They were all men.”

 

To address this, they got to work to identify the female power brokers of the mobile advertising space, now released.

 

Mobile has overtaken desktop as the means by which most people access the internet – especially in the rapidly-growing internet powerhouses of India, China and Africa. Combine this with the increasing numbers of women who are becoming ever more important economic decision makers and consumer purchasers, and you can see why it’s critical that we have female perspectives on what works, and why, for women.

 

Good on you, Business Insider, for leading the charge to celebrate female technology talent.

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Here are (some of) the Women in Tech!

Posted by: Alex Linley & Nicky Garcea

 

Could the tide for female entrepreneurs be turning? We think so.

 

As yet another indication of how women are making waves and standing up as role models to inspire other women, I’m delighted to support the celebration of (some of) the female entrepreneurs leading in technology entrepreneurship.

 

Paddy Cosgrave, organiser of the Dublin Web Summit, 17 & 18 October 2012, was inspired by the suggestion of his wonderful fiance, Faye, to dedicate his first speaker announcement to 10 of the leading female speakers at the Dublin Web Summit. They are:

 

Jen O’Neal, Tripping

Cindy Gallop, If We Ran the World

Deborah Berebichez, The Science of Everyday Life

Yulia Mitrovich, Svyaznoy Group

Shauna Mei, AHAlife.com

Eva Ho, Factual

Silje Vallestad, Bipper

Soraya Dorabi, Foodspotting

Alexandra Chong, Luluvise

Alexia Tsotsis, TechCrunch

 

And that’s not all. If you know a great (female) speaker in technology and entrepreneurship, you can recommend a speaker for consideration for the few remaining speaking slots at the Dublin Web Summit.

 

Here’s to many more female technology entrepreneurs getting the recognition they deserve.

 

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Future Spotting – Wired’s 7 Rules for What’s Coming Next

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

A large part of my role at Capp is about trying to identify the trends of the future, and then ensuring we are best positioned to make the most of them.

 

To that end, I was intrigued to read Wired’s 7 rules for spotting the future in the June edition, courtesy of Thomas Goetz, executive editor of US Wired.

 

As a reader of The Capp Blog, I thought you might appreciate them too, so here’s a summary:

 

1. Look for cross-pollinators: It’s well-known from the psychology of creativity that a major source of creativity can come through taking ideas from one discipline and applying them in another. This, it turns out, is also a great way to identify trends for the future. Look for something in one domain that could have applications in another, and you’re one step closer to predicting it happening.

 

2. Surf the exponentials: What are the major trends re-shaping the world around us? If you can spot these and work out where they will lead and what the implications will be, you’ll find yourself ahead of the game and closer to the future than otherwise.

 

3. Demand deep design: Steve Jobs taught us that deep design is about beauty, simplicity and intuitiveness. When something is perfect in its conception, easy to use, and obvious in its practice, it’s going to be here to stay – and it will re-define the benchmark for what follows.

 

4. Give points for audacity: The people who go out on a limb and risk taking a chance – the true entrepreneurs of the world – are those who shape what will be from the possibilities of what might have been. Pay attention to the risk-takers and the people with belief, since often they will be right and the rest of the world will follow.

 

5. Bank on openness: The internet has revolutionised what we think about intellectual property, ideas and even products themselves. So much, now, is free, and new industries are being built on the power of open-source. This democratization of everything is here to stay, and it’s leading to a very different future than we might otherwise have anticipated.

 

6. Favour the liberators: Some of the biggest opportunities that will shape the trends of the future rest on putting existing infrastructure to work in different ways. What great reservoirs of untapped resource lie dormant, just waiting for a liberator to see the world differently and release them? Innovation is the central tool of those who see things differently and will create a different future as a result.

 

7. Spend time with time-wasters: Who are the people doing different things just for the love of it? The people whose passion has taken them far beyond the day-to-day? It’s from this immersion at the edges of what is known, driven by an innate desire to explore, to invent, to push the boundaries, that the new dimensions of the future emerge.

 

What do you think? Do these 7 rules chime with your own experience of what you pay attention to  in order to know what’s coming next, or do you see things differently?
Let us know by sharing your Comments on The Capp Blog.

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Where are the Women Conference Speakers? The Unwitting Sexism that Surrounds Us (Part 3)

Posted by: Alex Linley, as part of Capp’s Female Leaders Month (June 2012)

 

I have just returned from a fabulous two days at Le Web in London. Organised and hosted by Geraldine and Loic Le Meur, Le Web is recognised as one of the most exciting internet and technology conferences around. This was no exception, with contributions from people like Kevin Systrom, CEO of Instagram, Phil Libin, CEO of Evernote, Niklas Zennstrom, CEO and Founding Partner of Atomico Partners (but perhaps better known to date for founding Skype) and Martha Lane Fox, our very own UK Digital Champion.

 

Nudged by Sarah Szalavitz, writing in Wired magazine (04.12, p. 65), I was interested in the question of “Where are the women conference speakers?” A quick tally up of the speakers at Le Web suggests 70 male conference speakers relative to 9 female speakers, and 27 male interviewers relative to 4 female interviewers (Le Web uses a great combination of presentations, together with lots of interviews on Loic’s famous sofa).

 

Let me be very clear: this isn’t a rant about Le Web – the conference was as superb as ever. But it is another opportunity for us to look at the subliminal messages that surround us about women, and about what women can and can’t do, and should and shouldn’t do – at least as suggested by these subliminal messages.

 

By my very rough estimation, the proportion of male to female conference speakers (7:1) was maybe only slightly lower than the proportion of male to female delegates (I’m guessing at 6:1), but it does make it even more important that we give visibility to female conference speakers who can engage, educate, entertain and inspire their peers together with an emerging generation of female talent.

 

To this end, Caroline Ghosn, CEO and Co-Founder of The Levo League deserves a special mention. The Levo League is an online community for Gen Y professional women, designed to help them through modern career challenges and development, so a great platform to address some of the very challenges that we are exploring as part of Female Leaders Month at Capp.

 

Martha Lane Fox – whom many of you will know from lastminute.com fame – also deserves a special mention, not only as an inspiring woman herself, but as someone working to inspire under-served populations in the UK through the power of the internet and modern technology. Working with the UK government, Martha Lane Fox is also helping the internet transform public service provision – a topic being spearheaded by the fantastic Mike Bracken, Executive Director of Digital, and one person who is restoring my faith in government to get caught up to the 21st Century.

 

And to complete the credits, I’d love to take this opportunity to acknowledge the other female speakers at Le Web, in the hope that it encourages more women in technology to step forward and showcase their own talents. Respect to:

 

Sandy Carter, Vice President, Social Business Sales and Evangelism, IBM Corporation

Sonia Carter, Head of Digital, Kraft Foods Europe

Soraya Darabi, Co-Founder, Foodspotting

Carla Henry, Yves Saint Laurent Beauty and Fragrances (L’Oreal Luxe)

Madlen Nicolaus, Senior Marketing & Community Manager, Salesforce Radian6

Maria Poveromo, Director, Social Media Systems, Adobe Systems, Inc.  

Rebecca Quinn, Director of EU Strategy & Operations, Wildfire Interactive

 

I hope they serve to inspire the many talented women in the world to stand up and take every opportunity they can to showcase their own talents, and in turn, to inspire other women to do the same.

 

It’s only by doing so that we will be able to start to overcome the subliminal messages that otherwise undermine our intent and ambition, often without us even realising. It’s time for us to change that.

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Importance of the Virtual World in HR – Human Capital Review

Posted by: Alex Linley

Pleased to share with you this article just published in Human Capital Review on the Importance of the Virtual World in HR. In this article, I discuss how we are using virtual delivery of training and development for programmes including Women in Leadership and performance management, with clients including Thomson Reuters and Standard Chartered Bank.

 

With restrictions on travel budgets, the emergence of new and effective ways of virtual working, and the realisation that transfer of learning can be effectively and powerfully achieved through virtual learning. As a result, helping people to stay in their workplace and apply their learning and insights immediately through development interventions that are embedded in their job and work environment is the way of the future.

 

No more do we need to end training or development sessions with “What will you do to apply this when you’re back in the office in Monday?”, since virtual learning allows learners to learn and develop in real time, without needing to leave their workplace.

 

As technology advances ever further, the power and the impact of the virtual world in HR will only become ever more apparent.

 

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