Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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October 2019
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strengths-based selection

Student Strengths Insights and Strengths-based Graduate Recruitment

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

I was speaking earlier today at an Ernst & Young event for university careers advisers, where we showcased some of the early results from the Ernst & Young-Capp Student Strengths Survey.

 

This is a survey of 1,085 undergraduate students, randomly sampled and balanced across gender, faculty and university, drawing from the 87 universities that comprise the top three quartiles of UK universities.

 

Here is a snapshot of our findings as we shared them today – the full report will be released in the next few weeks:

 

1. Just under half (48.8%) of the students said that they knew what their strengths were.

 

2. 9 out of 10 students agreed that using your strengths was important because it would help you to be happier, more engaged at work, to achieve your goals, and to realise your potential.

 

3. As a result, 97% of students thought it was important to use their strengths at work in their future career.

 

4. So much so, it transpires, that two-thirds of students would choose an average graduate salary and the opportunity to use their strengths at work, over and above a job with a higher than average graduate salary but little opportunity to use their strengths.

 

5. And taking this further, over 85% of students wanted a premium of 30% or more above the average graduate salary, in order to induce them to take a job that would not allow them to use their strengths at work.

 

Clearly, strengths matter – both to graduates and to their prospective employers.

 

With an increasing weight of evidence showing the benefits of strengths-based recruitment, for both candidates and organisations alike, it’s hardly surprising that more and more organisations are choosing to make the move to put strengths at the heart of their selection processes.

 

In future blogs, we’ll explore more of what this means and how you can make the change.

 

We’ll also be showcasing some of the many successes Capp has achieved so far with our market-leading and award-winning strengths-based recruitment and selection processes.

 

In the meantime, if you have comments or questions about strengths-based recruitment, let us know using the Comment function below and we’ll be pleased to respond.

 

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Strengths-based Recruitment and the Differentiation of ‘Brand’ – HR Magazine

Posted by: Celine Jacques

 

How can your selection process differentiate your brand?

 

Reena Jamnadas and I recently wrote for HR Magazine about the implementation of strengths-based recruitment being not just a way of better selecting talent, but of differentiating brand.

 

Organisations leading the way in attracting top talent have recognised that the selection process in itself is an opportunity to differentiate themselves from their competitors.

 

In fact, it actually plays a major role in transforming their brand. Growing  research on Generation Y shows they are eager to learn, to gain insight and to feel recognised as individuals.

 

In this article, we share our three top tips for making sure your organisation has the competitive edge:

 

1. Identify what makes your organisation unique

 

2. Make the competition irrelevant

 

3. Develop a strengths-based recruitment process.

 

See our article in HR Magazine to read more…

 

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Distinguishing between Confidence and Arrogance – Edge Online

Posted by: Celine Jacques

 

How do you tell the difference between a confident candidate and an arrogant one?

 

Together with Emma Trenier, I recently wrote for the Institute of Leadership and Management’s Edge Online, about how candidate confidence can sometimes be arrogance in disguise.

 

In today’s job market, with more applicants for fewer jobs, we know it is harder than ever for recruiters to spot talent. The challenge of seeing what a candidate is really like in a short assessment day is not to be underestimated.

 

Capp works with thousands of job applicants each year and has found that confidence is often hidden by fake, or exaggerated, assessment behaviour. When these confident candidates start work, some real problems can occur – they are unhappy with the level of work they are given, expect fast progression and alienate their peers.

 

Strengths-based selection can help companies steer clear of the confidence trap by measuring components of confidence rather than the broad impression of it.

 

Follow the link to read more in Edge Online.

 

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