Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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October 2019
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selection

Engaging graduates to recruit the best – an EY journey

Posted By: Alex Linley, Director, Capp and Nicky Garcea, Director, Capp
 

 

Ever wondered how you can differentiate yourself as graduate recruiter? Would you like to attract and retain the best early career talent? Then you should read our latest publication in this month’s Strategic HR Review, ‘Engaging graduates to recruit the best’.

 

This article explores how strengths-based recruitment is enabling graduate recruiters to engage, attract and select the best talent and draws on the example of major graduate recruiter, Ernst & Young, to show how strengths assessment can be used.

 

This article shows how the Capp Strengths-based Recruitment Methodology and the Situational Strengths Test engages candidates by providing them with a realistic job preview of the role. They help candidates to make informed decisions about their own fit. They help organisations to select the candidates who match their requirements more effectively from those who do not, delivering better outcomes for both parties.

 

If you would like to learn more about Ernst and Young’s journey, you can view the full article here.

 

If you would like to discuss the difference that our approach is making to the engagement, attraction and selection of earlier career talent, please contact Nicky Garcea at nicky.garcea@capp.co or connect on uk.linkedin.com/in/nickygarcea

 

 

 

 

 

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The Foundations of Excellent Selection

Posted by: Celine Jacques

 

What makes a fantastic selection process? Is it the methodologies you use? Or the scoring? Or perhaps the training of assessors and interviewers? These are all important, yes. But none are as critical as understanding what the role involves and what type of person will do great things in that role.

 

At Capp, we have supported many clients with their recruitment and selection, and the critical starting point remains the same whatever the level or sector, albeit Graduate / Board, or Retail / Legal / Financial. You have to understand what skills and behaviours are required in the role. This understanding then forms the foundation for the selection process that is designed. Whether that is a selection process based on strengths, or competencies, or both.

 

When a vacancy materialises (for a new or existing role) it is always tempting straight away to dive into defining the advert and the selection process. Do we need an application form? Do we need an interview? What exercises might we need at assessment centre? If you do this before thinking about what you need to assess in the selection process, then you enter very dangerous ground.

 

It is critical to understand what strengths, and behaviours, someone in the role needs. Some of the questions we ask our clients are:

 

What would someone ‘excellent’ in this role be like?

What behaviours would they demonstrate?

What kind of personality would they have?

Who is the person going to be working with?

Will they have any leadership responsibilities?

What decisions will they have to make?

Will they have to deal with change?

Is the content of their work  going to be ambiguous, or complex?

What forms of communication will they need to use? With whom?

What skills, qualities and behaviours will be critical to success not only in the role now, but in five or ten years time as the organisation changes?

 

Importantly, we ask a cross-section of employees and stakeholders, to get a full and rounded view. Not until we have a solid and consensual idea on the answer to these questions and more, can we really know what to assess. Without this knowledge, selection becomes a game of chance, and not of prediction. Crucially, the legal defensibility of selection decisions becomes very difficult indeed.

 

As Chuck Palahniuk (American novelist and satirist) once said: “If you don’t know what you want, you end up with a lot you don’t.”

 

The same applies for selection – if you don’t know what you are looking for, you are unlikely to find the right match!

 

The upfront work of understanding the outcomes of a role – defining success in role – really does pay off in the long run.

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