Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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May 2018
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Nicky Garcea (Capp) and Fiona Miller (Nestle) co-present Strengths-based Recruitment at CIPD Recruitment Conference

Posted by: Celine Floyd, Managing Psychologist, Capp

 

This week, we attended and presented at the CIPD Recruitment Conference 2013, in London. On the hottest day of the year so far, it was a pleasure to see so many of our industry peers networking, debating and sharing experience and ideas.

 

Nicky Garcea, Capp Director, presented with Fiona Miller, Talent and Resourcing Specialist at Nestlé. We have worked with Fiona, and the Nestlé team for over a year now, implementing end-to-end strengths based assessment for their graduate and intern intakes. It was a pleasure to co-present on the transformational journey Nestlé have made, and continue to make, in pursuit of more effective and impactful attraction, selection and on-boarding.

 

Nicky and Fiona talked through the drivers behind the move to strengths-based recruitment, the strengths-based assessments used, the evaluation data from Year 1, the challenges and learning, and plans for 2013.

 

The session was well attended, and we had some insightful questions from the audience around the hot topics of diversity and social mobility, as captured in this Recruiter article.

 

We will be commenting further on these hot topics over the next few weeks.

 

We thank attendees for throwing their energy behind our interactive exercise and hope that everyone enjoyed it, and maybe learnt something about their own strengths!

 

If you have any questions about our presentation, the Nestlé partnership or strengths-based recruitment please do contact us at Nicky.Garcea@cappeu.com or Celine.Floyd@cappeu.com

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Solving the Challenges of Modern Recruitment: The Situational Strengths Test

Posted by: Alex Linley & Celine Jacques

 

In our blog on Tuesday, we shared the 10 major challenges facing the modern recruiter. In this blog, we turn our attention to how our work in developing the Situational Strengths Test has been designed to address and solve many of these challenges.

 

The most resource-intensive challenge for the recruiter is often at the front-end of the funnel, with hundreds or thousands of candidates applying for only a handful of roles. How do you sort the talent from the also-rans, and ensure you attract the right people to apply, knowing they will have a better chance than most of succeeding in the role?

 

I once spoke to a retired recruiter (who will remain totally anonymous) and asked how he/she handled this problem in his/her day – this would have been in the 1980’s.

 

His/her response was strikingly simple: “We receive two mail sacks of applicants. I take one and give it to my secretary, instructing her to tell all those applicants that they have been unsuccessful. I take the other sack myself and work through the letters of application and CVs.”

 

Thankfully – for recruiters and applicants alike –  this “mail sack method” has now been replaced. New assessment methodologies and technology solutions – such as the situational judgement test and strengths-based recruitment, which we combined in developing the Capp Situational Strengths Test – have allowed us to move beyond this crudest of initial sift methodologies.

 

One of the best assessment methodologies is often considered to be the situational judgement test (SJT), since there is strong academic evidence showing that situational judgement tests demonstrate lower adverse impact and greater predictive validity than other assessment methodologies for recruitment.

 

Add in the fact that SJTs can be readily delivered online, and this becomes an attractive proposition. Combine this solution with the advances made by the strengths-based assessment and recruitment methods that we have pioneered at Capp over recent years, and you have a compelling solution to the modern recruiter’s most pressing challenges.

 

The assessment of strengths identifies the performance and energy that will differentiate a high performer in role. Strengths assessments are about finding out not just who can do the job (what a competency-based approach might show), but who can do and will love to do the job (the distinctive essence of strengths-based recruitment).

 

It is this combination of doing something well and loving doing it that delivers the many benefits we see for individuals and organisations from strengths-based recruitment.

 

By taking the best of SJTs and strengths assessment, and marrying them in the Capp Situational Strengths Test, we have solved many of the most pressing problems for recruiters. The Situational Strengths Test delivers a compelling online volume sift solution that differentiates the best talent from the rest, at the same time as helping candidates to really understand what the role is about and whether they are suited to it and the organisation.

 

In future blogs, we will explore in more detail how the Situational Strengths Test works, as well as delving deeper into the benefits that it delivers for candidate experience, together with the business-critical outcomes for organisations.

 

In the meantime, visit our Situational Strengths Test site to learn more about the Situational Strengths Test and how it could help you solve your recruitment problems.

 

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The Ten Challenges of Modern Recruitment

Posted by: Alex Linley & Celine Jacques

 

Speak to almost any recruiter, and you’ll quickly gain a picture of the recurrent challenges they face in their role, and how difficult these challenges can make their job for them.

 

Across our many recruitment clients at Capp, we have identified the 10 recurrent challenges that recruiters face:

 

1. “Gis’ a job, mister, any job”: For almost any organisation, and for graduate recruiters in particular, unease around the prospects of the economy means that more and more people are applying for any role they see advertised, rather than being more targeted and specific in their approach. The result is a volume problem for selection.

 

2. Candidate volume: More candidates than ever seem to be applying for the reduced number of roles available. Differentiating the best from the rest becomes ever harder and more resource-intensive as a result.

 

3. The war for talent: You might think, given the state of the economy, that the war for talent was over, and organisations had won. You couldn’t be more wrong. The best candidates know their worth, and expect hiring managers to convince them of why they should join – starting right from the organisation’s attraction and selection campaigns.

 

4. Here today, there tomorrow: Where once organisations might have recruited for a specific role, increasingly now they have to recruit people who will be able to adapt as fast as they do. The result is that you no longer have to just be a fit for the role, but also fit for the future.

 

5. More global and more ‘future leader’: For many organisations, this fit for the future means more global and more ‘future leader’, adding yet another lens to what organisations want in their new people.

 

6. “A great example of that was when…”: One of the major drawbacks of the prevalence of competency-based approaches is that candidates are so often well-rehearsed rather than well-prepared, making it difficult for recruiters to see behind the polish to the person they would really be hiring.

 

7. The curse of WikiJobs: This challenge is made all the more virulent through the ubiquity of WikiJobs, especially in the graduate recruitment arena, where candidates have been known to share interview questions and model answers within minutes of them first being asked in a live interview or assessment centre.

 

8. “You’re all the same to me”: Not only do candidates look and sound alike, but so do the selection methods and approaches used to recruit them. Competency-based recruitment was a big step forward from the intelligence testing (if anything) that we had before, but after 30 years and almost every organisation using them, the differentiation of competency-based interviews has passed.

 

9. Employer brand and being a ‘good rejecter’: When you’re in the volume recruitment game – whether you intended to be or not (see #1 and #2 above) – it’s all the more important to be seen as a ‘good rejecter’, since by definition, you’ll be saying ‘no’ to a lot more people than you say ‘yes’ to. Depending on your business, some or all of these people could well be current or potential future clients.

 

10. Twice the value, half the price: On top of all of these, recruiters are being asked to do more with less. “Yes, we want the best possible candidates you can find. No, we can’t increase your resources to do this – in fact, we’re going to have to top-slice them in line with the rest of the organisation.”

 

With these 10 challenges keeping them awake at night, it’s hardly any wonder that recruiters can sometimes feel like they’re up against it.

 

That’s why at Capp we developed the Situational Strengths Test, as one element of Strengths Selector, our five steps to strengths-based recruitment, to help recruiters solve all of these problems and more.

 

Visit our Situational Strengths Test launch site to see how we can help you.

 

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