Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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October 2019
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legacy

Leaving a Strengths Legacy in Your Career

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Strengths Consultant, Capp

 

I was asked recently to support a client on helping them work with the older generation in re-engaging them with their role as they approach their last 10 years at work. I thought I would share my reflections so you can see how Realise2 can support your workforce in leaving a strengths legacy through their career.

 

  • Connect individuals with their strengths of Legacy and Mission. Establish what this means for them in their role currently. How much do they use these strengths? What would it take to increase their use? How can their strengths make them feel as though they are making a difference? Whether it’s Innovation or in contrast Adherence, how can using these strengths support the person themselves, as well as helping others to achieve their goals?
  • How can you support/excite people with a longer term vision, based on their Realise2 profile rather than day job? What do they dream of achieving in the team? Where do they get the best positive feedback?
  • Are they focussing on their outcomes and delivering these with their strengths? Or are they simply doing what they always do that works? How can they get there another way whilst enabling and supporting the future talent of the organisation?
  • What do their unrealised strengths say? Here is potential to unlock further passion and energy. They might not be aware of this. Discovering it could leverage further motivation as it could be something new to get involved in.
  • How can they use their strengths to role model the future of the organisation? Who can they mentor and what strengths would make a lasting impact to others if they dialled those strengths up?
  • Often senior/experienced people have a lot of learned behaviours. Are they doing everything well, rather than maximising the top half of the quadrant? Having learnt to be capable in all areas may have got them to where they are now, but do they need to keep on proving themselves in their low energy areas?
  • Invite people to cross out those learned behaviours they simply don’t want to use anymore. This can be a helpful trick to get them to find more energising ways of doing things.
  • Re-write their leadership statement, this time based on their strengths. Consider ‘What do I really want people to come to me for and what do I not want them to come to me for? We can get known for our learned behaviours, so it’s important we don’t get stuck in this area.
  • What do they want to be read out at their retirement party?  What strengths lend themselves more towards these goals? Which learned behaviours need to be moderated to enable more focus?
  • If they are involved in succession planning, what are the strengths and weaknesses of the team? Where are the gaps and how could their strengths support them right now to develop and grow?
  • Do their strengths families show a preference for any particular behaviour? How can their role take on more of this whilst delegating the draining attributes to others?

 

As people start to look back over their careers and think about the next generation, a powerful way of doing that is to consider the strengths legacy that they can leave for those who follow. Help inspire your workforce to develop their own strengths legacy today!

 

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In Memoriam: The Strengths of Nelson Mandela

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Strengths Consultant, Capp

 

As my young children ask about the legacy of Nelson Mandela, with their schools recounting his eventful story, I begin by talking passionately about a hero, unlike any other person who will likely ever walk this Earth. My story, of course, started with strengthspotting what his Realise2 profile might have looked like.  

 

I started with his realised strengths of Mission, Moral Compass, Catalyst, Relationship Deepener and Compassion, and an Unconditionality that drove Mandela to be the architect of South Africa’s gradual transformation from racial despotism and moral turpitude, to a liberal democracy, saving his country from a bloody civil war. Becoming its first black president, steering South Africa’s journey of reflection and reconciliation into the post-apartheid era, he was probably not lacking in Counterpoint, Change Agent and Authenticity. Quite an epitaph!

 

Enduring very near primitive conditions when landing on Robben Island in 1962, his Drive, Resilience and Courage facilitated his survival in the face of the chilling words of one of the Afrikaner warders: “This is the island, and here you shall die.” His Catalyst and Compassion instilled in him a commitment to improve the amenities for all prisoners, enabling them not only to receive books and magazines, but to enrol in correspondence courses and even to take degrees.

 

But where do you end with heroes? It is almost impossible not to attribute most strengths to Mandela in view of his uncompromising Drive for Equality. He communicated this through his strengths of Spotlight, Narrator, and Explainer, by refusing to consign the crimes of the apartheid era to history, but instead initiating the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 1996. And how could we overlook the extent of his Persistence and Bounceback whilst incarcerated on Robben Island and facing the impact of his troubled personal life when others tested his loyalty.

 

So what were Mandela’s learned behaviours?  They may have included Incubator, Scribe and Listener. Although we could safely speculate that he would have employed these qualities with considerable ease, they would (in all probability) be subordinate to his innate strengths of Action, Equality and Change Agent in navigating South Africa’s transition towards democracy and freedom.

 

Perhaps we would see Gratitude as an unrealised strength since, by his own admission, in prison, he very much regretted not expressing his feelings of kinship with his fellow Soweto citizens.

 

Finally, let us not be afraid to mention that there was possibly one solitary weakness – and one shared by many of us – Adherence!

 

Mandela, as the ‘world is coming’ to your memorial service today, thank you for coming into our world.  History will be eternally grateful to you, and your legacy will live on for generations. Indeed, as one 9-year old asked: “Is he the man who brought black and white people together?”

 

This is the legacy for which you will always be remembered.

 

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