Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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May 2018
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happiness

Use Your Strengths to Achieve Your Goals and Be Happy

Posted by: Alex Linley, Capp

 

It seems a truism to say that using your strengths will help you to achieve your goals, and yet still nowhere near enough people treat their strengths as their starting point for how they will achieve their goals.

 

The link between strengths and goals is something that has intrigued us for many years at Capp, since it is the fundamental philosophy underpinning everything that we do in our work, from strengths-based recruitment, through strengths-based development, to delivering strengths-based performance.

 

A wealth of evidence shows the links between strengths and happiness, but until we started our work, there wasn’t really much that said WHY there was this link between strengths and happiness. In 2010, colleagues and I published a paper in the International Coaching Psychology Review showing that people who used their strengths more were more likely to achieve their goals, and in doing so, they were likely to be happier.

 

In this paper in the International Coaching Psychology Review, we proposed that this was reflective of the self-concordance model of healthy goal attainment. This is basically a posh way of saying that when your goals are things that fit with you and matter to you, and your strengths are, by definition, an authentic part of you that you enjoy using, then using your strengths to achieve your goals will help you to be happier and experience higher well-being.

 

This is fundamental to the whole strengths philosophy, and explains why we see better results in recruitment, development and performance when working from people’s strengths. In short, because it FITS. We are working with the grain, rather than against the grain.

 

That’s why we’re running the Realise2 promotion throughout the month of January, helping all of our clients, and their clients in turn, to link their strengths to their New Year’s Resolutions, thereby increasing their chances of achieving those resolutions and being happier. Throughout January, if you buy 4 Realise2 codes, you will receive a 5th code FREE!

 

Simply go to www.realise2.com and enter GOALS2015 at the checkout to make the most of this offer.

 

Advancing knowledge about strengths and goals is also why we’re supporting Josh Gladwin, a third year undergraduate psychology student at the University of Warwick, with his third year project. Josh is looking in more detail at the relationships between strengths and goal attainment, and he would love your help.

 

If you can spare 5 minutes, please help advance our knowledge and support his research by completing Josh’s questionnaire here -

https://warwickpsych.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3dsnQxvUCUFKamF

 

Thank you for your continued support, and don’t give up on those New Year Resolutions!

 

(P.S. – You’re less likely to if you’re using your strengths!)

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Do You Want to Be Happier?

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

There’s a lot of focus in the media on how people can become happier, and here at Capp we’re doing our bit as well.

 

Working with one of our big-name clients, we’re trialling a series of different happiness actions to see the impact they have on happiness.

 

If you’d like to take part and see what works for you – which will take around 15 minutes for you to complete – please join us here.

 

Full instructions are provided online, and we will send a £10 amazon.co.uk voucher to all participants who complete the survey and activities.

 

Thank you – and please feel free to share this post. The more people who take part, the merrier – literally!

 

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Measuring Britain’s Happiness – The First Results

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

The sun is shining and temperatures across the UK are soaring. It’s an auspicious day, then, for the Office for National Statistics to release some of the early findings from their first Subjective Well-being Annual Population Survey.

 

The data don’t really contain any surprises from what has been established in the happiness literature to date. For example, most people are happy, with average scores around 7 on the 10-point scale. People are happier if they are married, have a job, and own their own home.

 

Looking at the geographical distribution of happiness – always a favourite with the media – the top-ranked areas are Orkney & Shetland, and Rutland (which I fully support – it was where I married my wife!), while the lowest ranked were North Ayrshire and Blaenau Gwent.

 

So, as well as telling us about our GDP, the ONS has now made a start on telling us about our GNH (Gross National Happiness). But while the ONS can tell us about how happy we were, more open questions remain about how government in general – and our own actions as individuals in particular – may help or hinder our own happiness.

 

A major goal of positive psychology has been to increase the mean levels of happiness in the world. To this end, working with one of our major organisational clients, we will shortly be launching a research project to explore simple actions that people might take to increase their own happiness. It’s one contribution to seeing if we can increase the mean happiness of the British people.

 

Perhaps next year the ONS will be able to shed some light on whether or not we have succeeeded ;-)

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An Alternative View on Executive Bonuses

Executive pay and bonuses have hit the headlines again as we approach the bank bonus season, and politicians from all sides wade in to share their views on how and how much top executives should be remunerated. Rather than debate who is right or wrong, I’d like to share with you some research which provides an alternative model for how we think about the links between reward and performance.

 

The received wisdom has it that people will work harder and perform better if they are to receive a bonus that they spend on themselves. Yet there is also a growing body of evidence from the psychology research literature that shows that it really is better to give than to receive. But what does this mean for bonuses?

 

Michael Norton and colleagues asked this question, examining whether people who received a prosocial bonus (that they then spent on others or donated to charity) differed from their colleagues who received a personal bonus (that they spent on themselves).

 

Compellingly, they did.

 

In Norton’s first study, a group of Australian bank employees who were given a $100 voucher to give to charity reported higher levels of happiness and job satisfaction than their colleagues, who either received a $50 voucher to give to charity, or no voucher at all. Donating the company’s money to charity helped employees feel happier and more satisfied with their jobs. But what about their performance?

 

To address this, Norton’s second study looked at how prosocial incentives impacted performance. With a sample of Belgian pharmaceutical sales people, and a sample of Canadian dodge ball players, Norton found that prosocial incentives significantly outperformed personal incentives in their impact on team performance.

 

When team members received a prosocial bonus as distinct from a personal bonus, the performance of the team as a whole was significantly higher. For the pharmaceutical sales team, this computed to a significant return on investment: €10 spent on prosocial incentives returned a massive €52 in superior sales performance.

 

So, when it comes to thinking about how to ensure bonuses deliver performance, it seems that prosocial bonuses have the edge. Perhaps Vince Cable could offer a sizable donation to their favourite charity for the first FTSE 350 remuneration committee to adopt this approach?

 

Source: http://rady.ucsd.edu/faculty/seminars/2011/papers/norton.pdf

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