Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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April 2018
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Generation Y

Back to the Future at the AGR Annual Conference

Posted by: Nicky Garcea, Director & Helen Dovey, Consulting Psychologist, Capp

 

Capp are proud sponsors of the Association of Graduate Recruiters Annual Conference, 8-9 July 2013.

 

Over the last two days, Capp have attended and presented at this year’s AGR conference.

 

We launched our ‘I love strengths’ campaign at this year’s AGR event. It was incredible to see 500 delegates all spreading the strengths message from the bags they carried on their shoulders:

 

 

The theme of this year’s AGR conference was ‘Back to the Future’, and yes – there was a DeLorean time machine –  but no sign of Marty or Doc.

 

The opening key note was given by Dean Van Leeuwen, a founder of Tomorrow Today. Dean laid out the TIDES for change that are facing all early career recruiters:

 

  • Technology
  • Institutional change
  • Demographics
  • Environment
  • Social values

 

A key theme from Dean’s key note and across the whole conference was the positively disruptive role technology and ‘Big Data’ will play in the future of recruitment.

 

The generational divide was also highlighted between recruiters and applicants, with recruiters being ‘digital immigrants’ and Gen Y and Z being ‘digital natives’.

 

Simone Sellar, from EE, showcased the role that technology plays in the seamless recruitment of volume candidates. Simone showcased eArcu’s 2nd generation ATS platform, as well as hybrid situational judgement and personality tests, in-store assessments and online onboarding.

 

Delegates also discussed breaking away from traditional screening methods and adopting online inboxes.

 

Gamification featured in presentations and the exhibition hall.  Mars’ ‘Tweet for sweets’ campaign demonstrated how graduates can be used as your best graduate recruiter, rewarding graduates with chocolate who retweeted the Mars job site tweets.

 

It is clear reflecting on this year’s AGR that we are entering a time as recruiters that has no blue print. Generations Y and Z are going to expect us to engage with them earlier in their careers, in ways that haven’t yet been created and on platforms which haven’t yet been coded!

 

It is an exciting time to be a graduate recruiter. With 98% of Generation Z wanting to use their strengths at work, we know that employers who embrace the strengths approach – like Ernst & Young, Nestlé, and Barclays – will be ahead of the game.

 

To learn more about Capp’s presentation with Barclays at the AGR Conference, please watch out for our forthcoming blog that will cover this…

 

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Managing Generation Y? What Do They Want From You as Their Manager?

Posted by: Reena Jamnadas & Emma Trenier

 

It’s pitched as a strap line on the Association of Graduate Recruiters’ (AGR) website: Attracting and retaining the cream of the nation’s graduate talent is getting harder and you need all the help you can get”. And they are absolutely right.

 

The growing research about Generation Y echoes this, where today’s younger employees are achievement-oriented and hungry for challenge and meaning in their work. As organisations compete for available talent, employers cannot ignore the needs, desires and attitudes of this emerging generation.

 

Over a four month period, 1180 people took Capp’s online Ideal Manager Survey, where employees across all ages, genders and backgrounds answered questions about whether anyone can be a good manager.

 

Fascinatingly, the results reported by younger employees revealed specific strengths that they want most in their managers. These include:

 

  • Work Ethic: Younger employees value managers who role-model working hard, putting a lot of effort into everything that they do;
  • Resolver: Solving challenging problems is a strength that younger employees feel is important for managers to demonstrate;
  • Spotlight: Managers who demonstrate a love of being the centre of other people’s attention are valued highly amongst younger employees;
  • Detail: Conscientiously focusing on the small things to ensure everything is accurate and error-free is important for managers to demonstrate to younger employees.

 

These strengths paint a picture of a Generation Y that is strongly inspired and driven by managers who work hard and make high quality contributions, showcasing their knowledge and talents, whilst all the time ensuring accuracy and high standards.

 

So as employers and managers, how can we fulfil the needs of our younger employees, and thereby retain their engagement and talent? Below are five top tips:

 

1. Be a role model of working hard, meaningfully: As the saying goes, “work hard, play hard”. Demonstrate a healthy level of work ethic towards meaningful goals. Bring employees on board and get them involved in specific strategic goals by helping them see where their best contribution lies.

 

2. Ensure you resolve challenging issues: Identify problems or challenges that may be impacting on younger employees and/or your team more widely. Support younger employees to develop confidence and autonomy to resolve challenges successfully themselves too.

 

3. Provide exposure to different audiences: Identify opportunities for raising awareness about your team’s contributions in the spirit of knowledge management.  Find opportunities for younger employees to do the same through developing new connections for them, seeking speaking opportunities, or writing about their work through emails, articles or blogs.

 

4. Exemplify high quality work: Reflect on ways in which you can use your strengths to promote quality and accuracy as a manager in all your work and interactions. In addition, if younger employees are demonstrating other positive behaviours, then encourage and affirm these.

 

5. Adopt strengths-based team working: Identify how younger employees could partner with other members of the team, so that they complement each other’s strengths on a particular task or project. This is a powerful way of collaborating.

 

So starting from today, how will you adapt your management style to inspire the talent and engagement of your younger employees?

 

Download Capp’s Performance Manager White Paper to find out more about what people want from their managers.

 

 

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Student Strengths Insights and Strengths-based Graduate Recruitment

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

I was speaking earlier today at an Ernst & Young event for university careers advisers, where we showcased some of the early results from the Ernst & Young-Capp Student Strengths Survey.

 

This is a survey of 1,085 undergraduate students, randomly sampled and balanced across gender, faculty and university, drawing from the 87 universities that comprise the top three quartiles of UK universities.

 

Here is a snapshot of our findings as we shared them today – the full report will be released in the next few weeks:

 

1. Just under half (48.8%) of the students said that they knew what their strengths were.

 

2. 9 out of 10 students agreed that using your strengths was important because it would help you to be happier, more engaged at work, to achieve your goals, and to realise your potential.

 

3. As a result, 97% of students thought it was important to use their strengths at work in their future career.

 

4. So much so, it transpires, that two-thirds of students would choose an average graduate salary and the opportunity to use their strengths at work, over and above a job with a higher than average graduate salary but little opportunity to use their strengths.

 

5. And taking this further, over 85% of students wanted a premium of 30% or more above the average graduate salary, in order to induce them to take a job that would not allow them to use their strengths at work.

 

Clearly, strengths matter – both to graduates and to their prospective employers.

 

With an increasing weight of evidence showing the benefits of strengths-based recruitment, for both candidates and organisations alike, it’s hardly surprising that more and more organisations are choosing to make the move to put strengths at the heart of their selection processes.

 

In future blogs, we’ll explore more of what this means and how you can make the change.

 

We’ll also be showcasing some of the many successes Capp has achieved so far with our market-leading and award-winning strengths-based recruitment and selection processes.

 

In the meantime, if you have comments or questions about strengths-based recruitment, let us know using the Comment function below and we’ll be pleased to respond.

 

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Strengths-based Recruitment and the Differentiation of ‘Brand’ – HR Magazine

Posted by: Celine Jacques

 

How can your selection process differentiate your brand?

 

Reena Jamnadas and I recently wrote for HR Magazine about the implementation of strengths-based recruitment being not just a way of better selecting talent, but of differentiating brand.

 

Organisations leading the way in attracting top talent have recognised that the selection process in itself is an opportunity to differentiate themselves from their competitors.

 

In fact, it actually plays a major role in transforming their brand. Growing  research on Generation Y shows they are eager to learn, to gain insight and to feel recognised as individuals.

 

In this article, we share our three top tips for making sure your organisation has the competitive edge:

 

1. Identify what makes your organisation unique

 

2. Make the competition irrelevant

 

3. Develop a strengths-based recruitment process.

 

See our article in HR Magazine to read more…

 

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