Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

Click here to find out more about how Strengths Selector can solve your recruitment challenges...

Subscribe by Email

Enter your email address:


 Subscribe in a reader

October 2019
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

energy

Spring Forward! Five Ways to Get More Energy

Posted by: Emma Trenier, Senior Psychologist, Capp

 

March in the UK was very un-spring-like, with the enduring snow and cool temperatures. It’s no wonder that everyone seemed a little under the weather.

 

So, with clocks having gone forward last weekend, what can you do to put a spring in your step?

 

1. Take time out from energy sappers - we all spend time with some people who make us feel great and others who sap our energy. If you are already feeling low, take a break from the interactions and situations where you know you will leave feeling worse than when you arrive.

 

2. Find a different way to tackle draining tasks - if the approach you are taking isn’t working, don’t keep doing it. Seek the exception to the rule, a time when you found a similar task enjoyable. Why was this occasion different? Could you do it this way again?

 

3.   Stop mulling over things that have gone wrong – when we do something wrong or make a mistake, many of us are inclined to dwell on it. We might think it is our fault, we won’t be able to change and the consequences will be dire. Instead, take a leaf out of the optimists’ book and try considering the other factors involved. What can you do to put it right? Put the consequences into perspective.

 

4.   Celebrate other people’s good news – relationship researchers tell us that active responding versus passive responding is beneficial to relationships when things go wrong in people’s lives and also when they go right. When someone greets you with their good news, why not ask them to tell you more, share their happiness with them and capitalise on the moment.

 

5.   Use your unrealised strengths - discover what your unrealised strengths are by taking Realise2 or asking yourself what you are good at and enjoy doing but don’t do very much. Find a way to do it more. For example, if you have an unrealised strength in Courage, challenge yourself to do something scary every day – or at least every week!

 

Put these tips into practice and feel the energy start to flow. After all, summer is just around the corner!

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Realise2 – Capp’s Leading Edge Strengths Assessment and Development Tool

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

As many readers of The Capp Blog will know, Realise2 is Capp’s leading edge strengths assessment and development tool. It works by assessing 60 different strengths according to the three dimensions of performance, energy and use.

 

The results are then combined to determine where each attribute falls, into one of the four quadrants of the Realise2 4M Model, which are:

 

Realised strengths – high energy, high performance, high use

 

Unrealised strengths – high energy, high performance, lower use

 

Learned behaviours – lower energy, high performance, variable use

 

Weaknesses – lower energy, lower performance, variable use.

 

The 4 “Ms” of the Realise2 4M Model describe the advice that applies for optimal performance and development in each of these quadrants:

 

Marshal realised strengths – use them appropriately for your situation and context

 

Maximise unrealised strengths – find opportunities to use them more

 

Moderate learned behaviours – use them in moderation and only when you need to

 

Minimise weaknesses – use them as little as possible and only where necessary.

 

With over 50,000  people having now taken Realise2, here at Capp we have a wealth of experience and insight into how people use the Realise2 4M Model in practice, as well as the different strengths dynamics, interplays and combinations that come about. Most important of all, we know what these mean and the impact they have for you when it matters.

 

To share these insights and experiences with you, our loyal readers of The Capp Blog, we will be showcasing some of our most intriguing experiences and insights of Realise2 with you in an occasional series of forthcoming blogs.

 

If you’re not familiar with Realise2, you can find out more about the tool, including sample reports and purchase options, from the Realise2 website.

 

Watch this space for future insights, tips and techniques on Realise2, and let us know if you have areas of particular interest that you would like us to cover. Post your question or comment in the Comment section below.

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Have You Heard of the Progress Principle?

Posted by: Emma Trenier

 

Have you heard of the progress principle?

 

Regardless of incentives and recognition, the degree of accomplishment that we experience day-to-day has been highlighted as the #1 factor in high performance. So claim Teresa Amabile and Stephen Kramer, in their new book The Progress Principle.

 

It makes sense that we are more productive when we make daily progress, but the thing that strikes me is that so often when we make progress, we don’t notice or stop to acknowledge it, because we just don’t appreciate the value of each small step. You’re probably aware of Capp’s research showing that when people use their strengths they are more likely to achieve their goals. That is, they are more likely to experience that motivating feeling of accomplishment spurring them on to keep going, or to achieve the next thing.

 

So, my question to you is ‘How can we use our strengths to accomplish our daily tasks?’

 

Here are some reflections from the Capp team:

 

1. Use Your Strengths to Plan Your Day

Be clear on what needs to be done by the end of the day. If you are creative, draw a mind map. If you are ordered, write a list. If you have reconfiguration as a strength, use a set of post it notes.

 

2. Strength Checks

As you begin a task stop for ten seconds and think about the strengths that you can bring to it. Are you going to handle it using your Improver strength? Or perhaps your Enabler?

 

3. Pat on the Back

When you accomplish one of your tasks, however small, give yourself a pat on the back and take notice of the strengths you used to get there. You might even make a note of your achievement if you think this will help you to believe it.

 

4. Notice Your Energy

Time passes quickly when we are in flow, so you may not often think about what you’re doing when you enjoy these moments. When time has disappeared and you’ve barely noticed what you’ve been doing, notice the strengths that you were using and how they contributed to your progress.

 

5. Make Your Own Meaning

For those unappealing tasks use your imagination to find your own unique way of accomplishing them. This might mean creating a tea-making spreadsheet or competing with yourself to enter data but, using your strengths, it will lead to quicker accomplishment.

 

Perhaps it’s an uncontroversial speculation, but it’s one with a highly under-estimated impact: using our strengths to achieve the minutiae of daily tasks is one of the smallest things we can do to make the biggest difference – both to how we feel and to how effective we are.

 

Go and use your strengths to make progress today!

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS