Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

Click here to find out more about how Strengths Selector can solve your recruitment challenges...

Subscribe by Email

Enter your email address:


 Subscribe in a reader

May 2018
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

employability

Reflections from the Bright Futures Employability Conference

Posted by: Rachel Roberts, Capp

 

Last week I had the pleasure of attending the Bright Futures Employability event in Birmingham, which featured employers, students and school pupils all sharing ideas on the theme of youth employability. There were some fantastic speakers, including Francesca Campalani from Lloyds Banking Group who gave a passionate talk sharing her vision for employability and how this has changed over the years. Another of the keynote speakers was Capp’s CEO, Alex Linley, whose talk explored strengths and the vital importance of knowing and deploying your strengths to full effect. In the world of modern recruitment it has never been so important to have solid self-awareness , so that when young people are applying for roles they can share their strengths in a confident and passionate manner.

 

One of the other main themes I took from the event was about technology and innovation, as we see the rise of fresh approaches in the recruitment space, including the move to video interviewing by a number of large organisations. To really maximise the use of new technology when moving through the recruitment process, we heard a lot about the importance of self-awareness in young people. Knowing their strengths and skills means that young people are able to be more effective and confident when showcasing themselves. This will undoubtedly lead to them having a higher degree of employability and enable them to get the best role possible.

 

Bright Futures has committees across the UK and in over 60 universities their members are currently using the Jobmi platform (www.jobmi.com) to identify and understand their strengths, as a result of the partnership between Bright Futures and Capp. Jobmi is Capp’s free to use employability platform that acts as a career companion by offering free assessments which identify strengths and give feedback on how best to deploy those strengths both when searching for positions and in role. By really harnessing their strengths and skills, young people can really improve their employability factor and find the right role in the right organisation. This is what it is really all about in the end; getting the job that fits you and finding an organisation that reflects your own values. The Bright Futures event gave people lots of help and guidance on how they can and should do this.

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Are apprentices the new graduates?

posted by: Amy Willocks, Consulting Psychologist, Capp

 

Capp attended the The AGR Development Conference on the 13th March and in a session chaired by Simon Reichwald (Director, Bright Futures) we got the rare opportunity to gain an insight into what makes the successful apprenticeships schemes currently running at PwC, IBM, HSBC and BT so successful. Throughout all four presentations there were some really strong themes emerging on the drivers, challenges and benefits of this new but rapidly growing talent market. For starters the number of apprentices recruited by all four of the organisations were not just growing, but doubling in number e.g. PwC are set to increase apprentice numbers from 60 to 120 this year and BT are looking to recruit 1000 more this year compared to only 250 graduates.

 

All four of the apprentice schemes were clearly driven by the fact that all the organisations recognised that university is not for everyone, especially with forever increasing university fees, so the apprentice scheme is a way to capture that talent rather than just letting it pass by. However, from the insights shared by all the speakers it is clear that the growth and continued investment in apprentice schemes is down to a lot more:

  • Performance – apprentices are keen and need challenge, BT have found apprentices offer better ROI.
  • Retention – For HSBC their current retention after the apprentice programme is 97% and BT’s retention rates of apprentices are 92% after 5 years, whereas they only retain 34% of graduates.
  • Impact apprentices have on the rest of business – whether it be increased opportunities for others e.g PwC junior managers having coaching and development responsibility of apprentices; or with BT the energy burst they bring through their questions and curiosity that spreads across the business.

 

The four speakers were also very frank about the common challenges faced when recruiting apprentices and the three key ones to watch out for are:

  • Communication, feedback and support is vital to make the scheme work – apprentices need that extra support to flourish in your organisation.
  • Identifying the right people for the apprentice scheme – you need to get the message out to that demographic through the right channels, with the right messages and above all that message needs to be incredibly sexy.
  • Rigorous assessment processes are required to identify the talent, but in assessing there is no need to place any focus on academics.
  • Metrics on social mobility – there is real interest in the collection of these and can provide you with something powerful you can shout about to promote your apprentice scheme

 

Conclusion:

Every organisation should have an apprentice scheme! Seriously though the case studies from these four organisations certainly sold this to be the case. Tap this talent and achieve the remarkable benefits discussed above, surely you would be silly not to?  For more information on how Capp can help with both graduate and apprentice schemes please contact me at amy.willcocks@capp.co  or alternatively call 02476 323 363.

 

Please also contact me to talk about Jobmi the new employability and recruitment platform from Capp, connecting young people and employers. www.jobmi.com

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Capp launch the Jobmi Manifesto

 

We are proud to launch the Jobmi Manifesto today, on the opening day of National Apprenticeship Week and National Careers Week.
 

Jobmi is the employability and recruitment platform from Capp. It connects young people and employers. Young people are matched to the company’s success criteria using a range of Jobmi assessments that are free to access. Employers find candidates who are pre-screened and pre-qualified, and a fit for their culture, role and future.
 

Through the Jobmi Manifesto, we are building a stakeholder coalition to improve job prospects and recruitment practices for young people.
 

In the Jobmi Manifesto, you will see how we are working to:
 

Excite employers
Energise schools, colleges and universities
Engage young people
Enable strengths
Empower social mobility

 

Show your support for the Jobmi Manifesto here.

If you really want to help, please forward this to your colleagues and friends who want to support young people and early careers.
 

Together we will make a difference to the employability and recruitment prospects of young people.
 

Thank you
 

Capp
 

www.capp.co/

www.jobmi.com

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Introducing Jobmi – The Great New Employability and Recruitment Platform from Capp

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

Jobmi – www.jobmi.com – is the great new employability and recruitment platform from Capp.

 

Aimed at emerging talent and early careers, Jobmi helps young people to learn more about their skills and strengths, take assessments to build their employability, and complete employer assessments just once for consideration by lots of different employers.

 

At Capp, we’ve heard many of our graduate and early careers recruitment clients talk about how frustrated they are by the arbitrary screening criteria they have to introduce to manage candidate volumes.

 

These are things like UCAS points and applications only from specific universities, which allow recruiters to manage the applicant pool but create false barriers to social mobility.

 

Jobmi is our revolutionary solution to this problem. Jobmi removes the need for arbitrary screening criteria because Jobmi provides employers and recruiters with the data you need to make informed decisions.

 

With candidates completing employer assessments in advance at no cost to them, as an employer you have more data on a candidate - and the right data – than you have ever had available before.

 

Early client partners working with Jobmi include Barclays, Morrisons, Nestlé and NFU Mutual, with many more to be announced in the coming weeks.

 

Watch this space for further updates about developments on Jobmi, of which there will be many!

 

To become a Jobmi member yourself and claim your personalised Jobmi url before anybody else does, join us at www.jobmi.com

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Supporting Young Women into the World of Work

Posted by: Nicky Garcea & Alex Linley

 

This International Women’s Day, we believe that there’s no better time than now to explore the role that we can all play in encouraging and supporting young women to find their way in the world of work.

 

Here are our five top tips for how you can do so:

 

1. Help young women to identify their strengths – after many years at school, young women can be forgiven for thinking of their achievements only in terms of academic grades. Helping them early on to see that their strengths are more varied than this is key. Knowing their strengths will help them develop their authenticity and build their confidence as they start to explore the world of work.

 

2. Talk about work – at Capp, we see a marked difference in the graduates and school leavers that we meet. There are some whose parents or family members have spoken to them about work and the jobs that they do, and others who haven’t had so much of this exposure. Developing a level of commercial awareness at an early age can be a real differentiator when it comes to a first interview.

 

3. Make connections – the chances for business-focused work experience are becoming more rare, as are the opportunities for weekend work. Never before has it been more key that we offer young people – and particularly young women – the chance to get into business and build their network. What a difference it would make if we could each make five work connections for a female school leaver so she can start building her career network and contacts now.

 

4. Mock interviews and assessment centres – it is often the case that women can feel alienated and perform less well during the selection process. Creating familiarity with different types of assessments can be valuable. Find examples of  psychometrics on line, share interview questions you have been asked, and encourage the reading of financial papers and the business press.

 

5. Prepare the ‘work mindset’ – with a growing global emphasis on employability skills, it is clear that many school leavers and graduates lack the vital business skills they need for their work experience or in their first job. Describing the attributes of the people you work with who are highly engaged and productive can help job seekers hear what the best employees are like. Share how these people manage their profiles at work, what they do, and what they don’t. In particular, prepping young women to be prepared to work hard and learn from everything they do, and the mistakes that they make, will create a solid foundation for them to build on.

 

We urge you today - and for the weeks, months and years that follow – to consider how you might help a young woman that you know to realise her full career potential. We hope our five top tips for doing so provide a useful starting point.

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Reflections on School Leavers’ Fortnight

Posted by: Alex Linley & Nicky Garcea, as part of School Leavers’ Fortnight

 

Over the last two weeks on The Capp Blog, we have focused on helping school leavers tackle some of the big questions they face as they consider moving into the world of work or undertaking future study.

 

Our blog topics over the course of School Leavers’ Fortnight have taken in topics including:

  • Employability – what it is and how to demonstrate it
  • How to differentiate yourself so that you stand out on an application form
  • Insights into the mind of an interviewer and tips for interview technique
  • How to help students and young people spot their strengths and apply them to their choices about future courses and careers.

 

We hope you have enjoyed reading the blogs and – more importantly – that they have helped you to help the students and young people you know who are grappling with these challenges at this stage of their lives.

 

A recurrent theme throughout our advice over this fortnight has been the importance of helping people to know, understand and maximise their strengths. For this, nothing is better than Realise2, Capp’s online strengths assessment and development tool.

 

If you want to help a young person find their right direction in life, you would be well advised to give them the most powerful gift of strengths. This is what Student Careers and Skills have been doing at the University of Warwick – and it’s making a real difference.

 

Share your experiences and let us know how you get on by using the Comment function on The Capp Blog below.

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Stand Out on Your Application Form

Posted by: Sue Harrington, as part of School Leavers’ Fortnight

 

When applying for a job, there are two important opportunities for convincing a potential employer to select you over other applicants: the application form and the interview.

 

Many application forms now ask applicants to explain why they should be considered for the job – which is good news because it is your chance to sell yourself, make a good impression and secure an interview.

 

This means that completing an application form is not simply an administrative task – it’s an important part of the recruitment process.

 

Here are my top tips on how to maximise your impact:

 

1. First impressions really matter – make sure you complete the form fully and accurately and check your spelling. If you can’t complete the form online, keep your handwriting as neat as possible.

 

2. Identify your strengths by completing Capp’s Realise2 strengths assessment (www.realise2.com) and apply them to the requirements of the job. For example, strengths such as Detail, Order and Planful would be very useful in a job that involves project management, while Service, Explainer and Listener would help you in a call centre role.

 

3. Describe your strengths in relation to the job responsibilities. For example, “I am a good listener and I am able to explain complex ideas to others clearly”. Better still, illustrate with an example – perhaps you ran the debating society or were part of a mentoring programme at school.

 

4. Be specific when you are asked to explain why you should be considered for the job. Build your answer around the job description and the person attributes to show how you fit the requirements – using your strengths examples to illustrate the point.

 

5. Include anything that demonstrates your initiative, motivation and employability – as well as your qualifications. This includes any work experience, paid or voluntary; other positions you have held, such as a team captain at school; hobbies and interests, particularly where you have learnt new skills (e.g., sailing, rock climbing or writing apps).

 

6. Stand out – what have you done that is different to the norm, that demonstrates that you have what it takes to succeed in this role, and showcases your future potential by highlighting your past achievements?

 

7. Seek feedback from other people and ask them to check your application form for errors and improvements before you send it.

 

By adopting these strategies, you increase your chances of being invited for an interview.  They won’t be enough to get you the job – that’s down to you, after all – but they will take you one step further along the process.

 

And remember, all you need to do is ensure you get to the next stage each time. At the final stage, of course, if you’re successful, you’ll be offered the job!

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Employability (Part 2): Five Top Tips for Showcasing Your Skills

Posted by: Sue Harrington, as part of School Leavers’ Fortnight

 

Often school leavers are caught in a seemingly irresolvable situation: you need a job to develop your employability skills, but you need employability before you can secure a job.

 

But consider this: as a school leaver, you may be more employable than you realise.

 

Here are our five top tips for young people just leaving school and entering the job market, to help you assess and develop your personal employability skills:

 

1. Identify and map your own employability strengths: Understanding your own strengths will help you to assess your employability. You can do this by completing Capp’s Realise2 strengths assessment (www.realise2.com) and then mapping your strengths onto the five elements of personal employability that I outlined yesterday. For example, if your strengths include Personal Responsibility, Persistence, Planful and Drive, what does that say for your level of self-direction?

 

2. Provide concrete examples of your employability: Look for the opportunity on application forms or at interviews to demonstrate your employability. Have you taken up a new hobby, researched it, taught yourself the requisite skills and become competent? Have you planned and arranged a holiday for you and friends? Remember, as a school leaver, employers will not be expecting all your employability evidence to be work-based.

 

3. Use work experience: Have you already gained some work experience, in the evenings, weekends or school holidays? This will have given you some insight into what it is like at work – what has it shown you about working in teams, solving problems or dealing with customers? What difficult situations have you handled successfully?

 

4. Gain more work experience: All work experience is useful for developing your employability skills and shows initiative on your CV and application form. Are there any internships available in jobs that interest you? Try searching the Internet or talking to your parents and their friends about opportunities where they work. Consider volunteering – unpaid work is still valuable experience and shows your work ethic to potential employers.

 

5. Find yourself a mentor – think of an adult you know who you respect and can talk to easily, preferably one who has the type of job you would like. This might be a member of your own family, a friend of your family, or the parent or elder brother or sister of a friend.

 

Talk to your mentor about their job and what it is like at work. For example, you might what to talk to them about the following things:

  • How did they get the job? Where was it advertised? What did they include on the application form? What questions were they asked at the interview?
  • What strengths, skills and knowledge are important for doing their job well? What are the challenges of their job and how do they overcome them?
  • Discuss your own strengths with your mentor and how you think they map onto employability. Talk to you mentor about how you can apply your experience to securing a job. For example, you may have been the captain of a sports team at school (which would demonstrate team-working skills and leadership potential) or you may have learnt to rock climb or play a musical instrument (demonstrating initiative, persistence and drive).

 

Leaving school and finding that first job is both exciting and daunting. Whilst having the right qualifications is still important for many jobs, understanding employability and being able to demonstrate these skills to potential employers is key.

 

In fact, it could just be the key that unlocks the door to your first job as a school leaver seeking employment.

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Employability (Part 1): Have You Got What Employers are Looking For?

Posted by: Sue Harrington, as part of School Leavers’ Fortnight

 

Employability has become a familiar and commonplace term, used by employers and the media in the post economic-crisis job market. But what does “employability” actually mean and what is its relevance for school leavers?

 

Employability refers to a person’s ability to secure a job, to remain employed, and to progress and perform well in their job. Developing employability skills is important for anyone wanting employment, even those who already have jobs, but it is particularly important for school leavers.

 

Nowadays, there is significant competition for fewer jobs and, unfortunately, unemployment amongst young people is on the increase. Employers often choose to recruit people who have already developed their employability skills through previous work experience in favour of inexperienced school leavers.

 

There are two main areas of employability. The ability aspect is about possessing a good standard of numerical, literacy and ICT (information and communication technology) skills. This includes proficiency with basic arithmetic, being able to write and speak clearly, a good vocabulary, and being able to listen well and ask appropriate questions of others.

 

The second aspect of employability is to do with your personal attributes, strengths and attitudes. Regardless of people’s previous experience or qualifications, employers are seeking people who have the right mindset to flourish at work.

 

Across a wide range of industries and businesses, employers describe a consistent pattern of personal employability skills:

 

  1. A positive mental attitude: a willingness and readiness to take on tasks and contribute; an openness to change and new ideas; a proactive approach to identifying better ways of doing things; and a drive to get things done.  It’s about being a “glass half full” person.
  2. Team-working: being able to get on with others, communicate well and work in a team. This includes being able to deal with disagreements and conflict when necessary.
  3. Self-direction: being able to work independently, keep yourself motivated, manage your own time and prioritise your tasks. This involves taking personal responsibility for your work and seeking and accepting feedback from colleagues.
  4. Problem-solving: showing initiative and having a creative and flexible approach to solving problems, being able to think situations through logically and generate potential solutions. This involves being resilient and bouncing back when things don’t go right.
  5. Business “savvy”: understanding what your organisation does, what “success” looks like for your employer and how your work contributes to this success.

 

Understanding what employability means is only part of the challenge – school leavers also need to develop their employability and demonstrate it to potential employers, if they are to be successful in today’s job market.

 

See Part 2 of this blog tomorrow, when I will explore how school leavers can assess and develop their core employability skills.

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Guardian online – Graduates: Is a 2:1 the best qualification for landing a job?

Just received the link to Graham Snowdon’s article in the Guardian online. With the move towards the new Higher Education Achievement Report (Hear), it seems increasingly likely that companies will be able to make more informed judgements about the graduates applying to them – just as Ernst & Young have been doing for the last three years by using strengths-based recruitment.

 

The Hear report is also likely to mean that graduate employers start looking more broadly about what students bring with them into the world of work. Their qualifications show what they have done in the past, but their strengths give a far better indication of what they will be able to do in the future.

 

Even so, the Association of Graduate Recruiters reports that 75% of its members still use degree classifications as their primary screening tool.

 

Time for a change, I think. Let’s start paying more attention to what students are capable of doing after they join our companies – through identifying and developing their strengths – rather than just looking at what they have done in their past at university.

 

Assessing and developing strengths helps you find out about what people love to do and where they will shine. This is what any prospective employer really wants to know when judging the fit of a candidate against their role requirements and the culture of the organisation. Get the right people into the right roles, and it’s simply better for everyone.

 

What do you think? Do degree qualifications determine your career path, or do your strengths have far more to do with how you succeed in the end?

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS