Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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October 2019
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attraction

Engaging graduates to recruit the best – an EY journey

Posted By: Alex Linley, Director, Capp and Nicky Garcea, Director, Capp
 

 

Ever wondered how you can differentiate yourself as graduate recruiter? Would you like to attract and retain the best early career talent? Then you should read our latest publication in this month’s Strategic HR Review, ‘Engaging graduates to recruit the best’.

 

This article explores how strengths-based recruitment is enabling graduate recruiters to engage, attract and select the best talent and draws on the example of major graduate recruiter, Ernst & Young, to show how strengths assessment can be used.

 

This article shows how the Capp Strengths-based Recruitment Methodology and the Situational Strengths Test engages candidates by providing them with a realistic job preview of the role. They help candidates to make informed decisions about their own fit. They help organisations to select the candidates who match their requirements more effectively from those who do not, delivering better outcomes for both parties.

 

If you would like to learn more about Ernst and Young’s journey, you can view the full article here.

 

If you would like to discuss the difference that our approach is making to the engagement, attraction and selection of earlier career talent, please contact Nicky Garcea at nicky.garcea@capp.co or connect on uk.linkedin.com/in/nickygarcea

 

 

 

 

 

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Attraction and Assessment: What’s the Missing Link?

Posted by: Jamie Betts & Celine Jacques

 

In the first of four blog posts this week that preview Strengths Selector, Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment, Jamie Betts and Celine Jacques look at Strengths Attraction, the first step in the candidate funnel.

 

Expectations. They matter – and as anyone who has lost a new starter due to mismatched expectations will tell you, there is a genuine business cost associated with not meeting them.

 

It’s interesting, then, that many organisations don’t link their attraction and assessment strategies. This applies even in cases where organisations use a sophisticated and integrated direct hiring model (e.g., for graduate or volume campaigns).

 

In addition, for experienced hires, many organisations effectively outsource their attraction message to recruitment agencies. This will be the case for any organisation that has at least a partial reliance on agencies for their experienced hire recruitment.

 

This is perhaps unintended cause-and-effect. Organisations are not intentionally failing to link attraction and assessment, it’s just that the advertising agencies who develop the attraction message rarely link this to the requirements and realities of the job itself.

 

Further to this, recruitment agencies who engage with experienced hires on LinkedIn, and advertise on job boards, have their own message to ‘hook’ candidates. This means you lose control, and any attempt to effectively link attraction and assessment would be lost too.

 

When it comes to attracting the best possible talent, this matters. Even organisations with a robust direct hiring model, who are firmly in control of their employer brand and external positioning, only rarely link this message to the behaviours, or strengths, which will drive success in the role.

 

This is the missing link between attraction and assessment – an attraction strategy informed not only by your employer brand, but a message which is more likely to speak to those who will genuinely excel at the job.

 

Linking attraction with assessment is a logical step forward. Think of it as a head start in your screening process – and an opportunity to define a truly differential message to the marketplace. This is what the Strengths Attraction step of Strengths Selector is designed to do.

 

Find out more about Strengths Selector, Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment, here.

 

Jamie Betts is a Principal Consultant, and Celine Jacques is a Managing Psychologist, both at Capp.

 

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Technology, Innovation and Your End-to-End Candidate Experience

Posted by: Celine Jacques

 

Earlier this week we shared more detail around the Situational Strengths Test, our new online volume sifting tool. So, here we are, combining our thought leadership in strengths with the eternal limit-pushing world of technology. How exciting!

 

On Tuesday evening, I attended a recruitment event in London, where practitioners discussed the likes of using LinkedIn for headhunting, and video interviewing. It was a fascinating session, and there was some great debate.

 

The combination and balance of technology, theoretical breakthroughs, rigour, fairness, legal defensibility, cost, and internal buy-in is what continues to make recruitment and selection an exciting and challenging area to work in.

 

Innovation and the use of technology is great for an early selection stage such as the volume sift of the Situational Strengths Test. It is important, though, for this to link with the rest of the candidate journey. So how does the Situational Strengths Test fit with our end-to-end process for strengths-based recruitment solutions? This is where the Strengths Selector comes in.

 

The Situational Strengths Test is the second step in Strengths Selector, Capp’s five steps to strengths-based recruitment, which also includes Strengths Attraction, Strengths Based Interview, Strengths Assessment Centres and Strengths On-boarding.

 

Recruitment is an end-to-end process, and your candidates experience some or all of this process with you, which is a direct experience of your organisation, brand and culture.

 

Ensuring that there is a consistent ‘feel’ and ‘message’ is key – recognising that each stage is great on its own is important, but really, the whole is a lot more than the sum of its parts. If a process feels disjointed, so will candidates’ experience of your organisation.

 

In next week’s blogs, we look at the broader recruitment journey through the lens of Capp’s Strengths Selector, incorporating the Situational Strengths Test, and share our latest insights.

 

We will discuss the challenges we see across different stages recruitment, and across different industry sectors, and show you how the five steps of strengths-based recruitment in the Strengths Selector are delivering value and making a difference to talent assessment and selection.

 

 

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Student Strengths Insights and Strengths-based Graduate Recruitment

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

I was speaking earlier today at an Ernst & Young event for university careers advisers, where we showcased some of the early results from the Ernst & Young-Capp Student Strengths Survey.

 

This is a survey of 1,085 undergraduate students, randomly sampled and balanced across gender, faculty and university, drawing from the 87 universities that comprise the top three quartiles of UK universities.

 

Here is a snapshot of our findings as we shared them today – the full report will be released in the next few weeks:

 

1. Just under half (48.8%) of the students said that they knew what their strengths were.

 

2. 9 out of 10 students agreed that using your strengths was important because it would help you to be happier, more engaged at work, to achieve your goals, and to realise your potential.

 

3. As a result, 97% of students thought it was important to use their strengths at work in their future career.

 

4. So much so, it transpires, that two-thirds of students would choose an average graduate salary and the opportunity to use their strengths at work, over and above a job with a higher than average graduate salary but little opportunity to use their strengths.

 

5. And taking this further, over 85% of students wanted a premium of 30% or more above the average graduate salary, in order to induce them to take a job that would not allow them to use their strengths at work.

 

Clearly, strengths matter – both to graduates and to their prospective employers.

 

With an increasing weight of evidence showing the benefits of strengths-based recruitment, for both candidates and organisations alike, it’s hardly surprising that more and more organisations are choosing to make the move to put strengths at the heart of their selection processes.

 

In future blogs, we’ll explore more of what this means and how you can make the change.

 

We’ll also be showcasing some of the many successes Capp has achieved so far with our market-leading and award-winning strengths-based recruitment and selection processes.

 

In the meantime, if you have comments or questions about strengths-based recruitment, let us know using the Comment function below and we’ll be pleased to respond.

 

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