Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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May 2018
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assessment

Nicky Garcea (Capp) and Fiona Miller (Nestle) co-present Strengths-based Recruitment at CIPD Recruitment Conference

Posted by: Celine Floyd, Managing Psychologist, Capp

 

This week, we attended and presented at the CIPD Recruitment Conference 2013, in London. On the hottest day of the year so far, it was a pleasure to see so many of our industry peers networking, debating and sharing experience and ideas.

 

Nicky Garcea, Capp Director, presented with Fiona Miller, Talent and Resourcing Specialist at Nestlé. We have worked with Fiona, and the Nestlé team for over a year now, implementing end-to-end strengths based assessment for their graduate and intern intakes. It was a pleasure to co-present on the transformational journey Nestlé have made, and continue to make, in pursuit of more effective and impactful attraction, selection and on-boarding.

 

Nicky and Fiona talked through the drivers behind the move to strengths-based recruitment, the strengths-based assessments used, the evaluation data from Year 1, the challenges and learning, and plans for 2013.

 

The session was well attended, and we had some insightful questions from the audience around the hot topics of diversity and social mobility, as captured in this Recruiter article.

 

We will be commenting further on these hot topics over the next few weeks.

 

We thank attendees for throwing their energy behind our interactive exercise and hope that everyone enjoyed it, and maybe learnt something about their own strengths!

 

If you have any questions about our presentation, the Nestlé partnership or strengths-based recruitment please do contact us at Nicky.Garcea@cappeu.com or Celine.Floyd@cappeu.com

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Attraction and Assessment: What’s the Missing Link?

Posted by: Jamie Betts & Celine Jacques

 

In the first of four blog posts this week that preview Strengths Selector, Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment, Jamie Betts and Celine Jacques look at Strengths Attraction, the first step in the candidate funnel.

 

Expectations. They matter – and as anyone who has lost a new starter due to mismatched expectations will tell you, there is a genuine business cost associated with not meeting them.

 

It’s interesting, then, that many organisations don’t link their attraction and assessment strategies. This applies even in cases where organisations use a sophisticated and integrated direct hiring model (e.g., for graduate or volume campaigns).

 

In addition, for experienced hires, many organisations effectively outsource their attraction message to recruitment agencies. This will be the case for any organisation that has at least a partial reliance on agencies for their experienced hire recruitment.

 

This is perhaps unintended cause-and-effect. Organisations are not intentionally failing to link attraction and assessment, it’s just that the advertising agencies who develop the attraction message rarely link this to the requirements and realities of the job itself.

 

Further to this, recruitment agencies who engage with experienced hires on LinkedIn, and advertise on job boards, have their own message to ‘hook’ candidates. This means you lose control, and any attempt to effectively link attraction and assessment would be lost too.

 

When it comes to attracting the best possible talent, this matters. Even organisations with a robust direct hiring model, who are firmly in control of their employer brand and external positioning, only rarely link this message to the behaviours, or strengths, which will drive success in the role.

 

This is the missing link between attraction and assessment – an attraction strategy informed not only by your employer brand, but a message which is more likely to speak to those who will genuinely excel at the job.

 

Linking attraction with assessment is a logical step forward. Think of it as a head start in your screening process – and an opportunity to define a truly differential message to the marketplace. This is what the Strengths Attraction step of Strengths Selector is designed to do.

 

Find out more about Strengths Selector, Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment, here.

 

Jamie Betts is a Principal Consultant, and Celine Jacques is a Managing Psychologist, both at Capp.

 

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The Foundations of Excellent Selection

Posted by: Celine Jacques

 

What makes a fantastic selection process? Is it the methodologies you use? Or the scoring? Or perhaps the training of assessors and interviewers? These are all important, yes. But none are as critical as understanding what the role involves and what type of person will do great things in that role.

 

At Capp, we have supported many clients with their recruitment and selection, and the critical starting point remains the same whatever the level or sector, albeit Graduate / Board, or Retail / Legal / Financial. You have to understand what skills and behaviours are required in the role. This understanding then forms the foundation for the selection process that is designed. Whether that is a selection process based on strengths, or competencies, or both.

 

When a vacancy materialises (for a new or existing role) it is always tempting straight away to dive into defining the advert and the selection process. Do we need an application form? Do we need an interview? What exercises might we need at assessment centre? If you do this before thinking about what you need to assess in the selection process, then you enter very dangerous ground.

 

It is critical to understand what strengths, and behaviours, someone in the role needs. Some of the questions we ask our clients are:

 

What would someone ‘excellent’ in this role be like?

What behaviours would they demonstrate?

What kind of personality would they have?

Who is the person going to be working with?

Will they have any leadership responsibilities?

What decisions will they have to make?

Will they have to deal with change?

Is the content of their work  going to be ambiguous, or complex?

What forms of communication will they need to use? With whom?

What skills, qualities and behaviours will be critical to success not only in the role now, but in five or ten years time as the organisation changes?

 

Importantly, we ask a cross-section of employees and stakeholders, to get a full and rounded view. Not until we have a solid and consensual idea on the answer to these questions and more, can we really know what to assess. Without this knowledge, selection becomes a game of chance, and not of prediction. Crucially, the legal defensibility of selection decisions becomes very difficult indeed.

 

As Chuck Palahniuk (American novelist and satirist) once said: “If you don’t know what you want, you end up with a lot you don’t.”

 

The same applies for selection – if you don’t know what you are looking for, you are unlikely to find the right match!

 

The upfront work of understanding the outcomes of a role – defining success in role – really does pay off in the long run.

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The Emerging Practice of Strengths-Based Recruitment

There are greater numbers of candidates and more people with high potential on the market than ever before.

As a result, it is vital that HR professionals think differently about recruitment and approach interviews in a new way in order to ensure that the right candidates are chosen for the right roles.

 

Although the competency-based method of assessment is still being used unchallenged in many HR departments, the method has fundamental flaws.

 

While the focus is on assessing what people claim they can do or to have them provide examples of what they have done, the problem is that most recruitment and careers advice services run classes to help candidates practice their interview technique on this basis.

 

In contrast, using a strengths-based method helps employers to recruit people based on their natural talents by enabling them to identify and assess the things that candidates not only do well but also love doing. The approach is more reliable because it matches an individual’s strengths to a given role, ensuring that job applicants are not just capable, but will actually be engaged and motivated enough to live up to expectations.

 

Strengths-based recruitment likewise enables people to be more authentic and to show themselves for who they genuinely are. Practitioners are trained to look for energy and authenticity as well as evidence of high performance in relation to the strengths under consideration – a combination that should guarantee the appointment of a genuine high flier.
To read more, join the 1474 HR directors and professionals who have read this article on strengths-based recruitment in full on HR Zone.

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