Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

Click here to find out more about how Strengths Selector can solve your recruitment challenges...

Subscribe by Email

Enter your email address:


 Subscribe in a reader

May 2018
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Apprentices

Introducing Jobmi – The Great New Employability and Recruitment Platform from Capp

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

Jobmi – www.jobmi.com – is the great new employability and recruitment platform from Capp.

 

Aimed at emerging talent and early careers, Jobmi helps young people to learn more about their skills and strengths, take assessments to build their employability, and complete employer assessments just once for consideration by lots of different employers.

 

At Capp, we’ve heard many of our graduate and early careers recruitment clients talk about how frustrated they are by the arbitrary screening criteria they have to introduce to manage candidate volumes.

 

These are things like UCAS points and applications only from specific universities, which allow recruiters to manage the applicant pool but create false barriers to social mobility.

 

Jobmi is our revolutionary solution to this problem. Jobmi removes the need for arbitrary screening criteria because Jobmi provides employers and recruiters with the data you need to make informed decisions.

 

With candidates completing employer assessments in advance at no cost to them, as an employer you have more data on a candidate - and the right data – than you have ever had available before.

 

Early client partners working with Jobmi include Barclays, Morrisons, Nestlé and NFU Mutual, with many more to be announced in the coming weeks.

 

Watch this space for further updates about developments on Jobmi, of which there will be many!

 

To become a Jobmi member yourself and claim your personalised Jobmi url before anybody else does, join us at www.jobmi.com

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

50 Shades of Entry Level Talent

Posted by: Helen Dovey, Consulting Psychologist & Nicky Garcea, Director, Capp

 

Two weeks on from the Association of Graduate Recruiters Annual Conference, we’re continuing to reflect on some of the hot topics that grabbed the delegates’ attention.

 

A discussion panel led by a diverse mix of graduate recruiters explored the shades of grey involved in attracting and recruiting for entry level talent.

 

How do recruiters tap into this talent pool? Whose responsibility is it to create opportunities at an entry level rather than at graduate level? What is best practice for assessing entry level recruits fairly?

 

These were some of the questions addressed during and after the session.

 

What’s our take on this?

 

First, we support advising recruiters to consider “what other programmes do we offer that aren’t graduate level?” Of course, there are budgetary and practical considerations associated with this. Recruiters need to clarify where best to place entry level recruits in the business and manage the cost of designing and implementing programmes that are of mutual benefit to the individual and the employer.

 

This may sound like a taxing prospect for employers. However, an interesting revelation is that entry level recruitment isn’t worlds away from graduate recruitment. In fact, the entry level candidates we are seeing with our own clients are just as hungry, intellectually capable and in some cases, more commercially minded than their existing graduates.

 

Our advice to employers would be not to underestimate this talent pool. Look at your business needs, but we bet you’ll be pleasantly surprised by the calibre of this emerging talent pipeline!

 

Second, we recognise the joint responsibility of recruiters and schools in generating opportunities for entry level recruits. Schools need to promote entry level opportunities as an equally decent alternative to university, while recruiters need to engage proactively in making links with schools and colleges.

 

Finally: the assessment piece. How do you fairly assess a group of people with very little work experience? Competency-based recruitment focuses on past behavioural experience for which school leavers will struggle to provide examples.

 

Instead we want to look at potential. Strengths-based assessment provides the answer. Assessing candidates on their learning agility, energy and motivation provides a dynamic insight into their potential to excel.

 

To learn more about Capp’s work in entry level talent, please look out for our upcoming case study with Nestlé and their innovative Fast Start Programme, bringing great school leaver and apprentice talent into their business.

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Apprenticeships and Internships: A Personal View

Posted by: Laura Firmin, Intern, Capp

 

An introductory note from Alex Linley: Laura is a graduate of the University of Warwick and joined us as an intern at the beginning of the year, quickly establishing herself as an asset to our team. Here, as part of National Apprenticeship Week, Laura shares her personal reflections on what it means to be an intern or an apprentice.

 

“National Apprenticeship Week challenges those who regard individuals on training schemes as less beneficial to business than those with traditional academic qualifications. It has come to my attention that those who follow the academic route but also engage in work-based training embark on what is called an Internship; those who do not, complete an Apprenticeship instead.

 

But are the two that different? Employers welcome those candidates who have completed internships, even to the detriment of those who have no work experience, yet shun young people who have been an apprentice.

 

There is a play off between following a university route and embarking on an apprenticeship. Throughout college and university, the responsibility is entirely yours for completing work – you learn to manage your time and to motivate yourself for independent working.

 

Within an apprenticeship scheme, you may have more structure to your day and a manager. But you learn the importance of building relationships with colleagues and assimilating your routine to that of others. People rely on your work. On a degree course like mine, only you suffer when your work is not completed on time.

 

My degree in Sociology has broadened my ability to reflect critically on the world; I have developed writing skills. But upon graduating, I was still afraid to pick up the telephone to an unknown caller.

 

My degree work was almost exclusively assessed on what I could produce individually rather than as a team, which prevented me from growing interpersonal relationships with peers. I therefore ask: how useful is an individual to business if they find it difficult to function in a professional environment?

 

Both Apprenticeships and Internships ensure that young people are ready for work and more importantly, feel confident being in a work environment. Apprentices even complete a formal qualification as a culmination of their training.

 

As an Intern at Capp, I am not following a set training procedure, I am awarded the freedom to create and nurture my own skills development. For example, I recently designed and led a workshop for female students as part of International Women’s Week. I felt intrinsic enthusiasm for the success of the workshop because it was not simply a requirement for a formal programme that I would gain marks for completing.

 

Perhaps employers fear that formal qualifications do not necessarily emphasise the individual’s energy for the work in the same way as informal successes do, but I cannot believe that this is true. All career-focussed individuals will, at times, do work purely in order to further their progress, whether it is formally assessed or not.

 

Apprenticeships still have a way to go before they are regarded by employers having the same prestige as internships seem to have gained. It is likely that class prejudice plays a part in this as many Internships are unpaid, and are thus only available to individuals who can afford to live on other means.

 

Whatever work-based training is called, it is an important aspect of a young person’s development that should continue to receive support from employers.”

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS