Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

Click here to find out more about how Strengths Selector can solve your recruitment challenges...

Subscribe by Email

Enter your email address:


 Subscribe in a reader

May 2018
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Uncategorized

Using your strengths, is a truer insight to a young person’s readiness to enter work

Posted by: Helen Dovey, Senior Psychologist, Capp

 

“Small jobs make a big difference to young people.” This was the keynote message delivered by Michael Davies, the Chief Executive of the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES) last week. Mr Davies opened the launch of ‘Precarious Futures: Youth Employment in an International Context’ report, hosted in the Science Museum.

 

I attended with the great and good from industry, parliament and academia to hear the UKCES’s recommendations for addressing youth unemployment today.

 

The resounding conclusion was clear: any kind of work experience significantly improves the career trajectory of young people today.

 

And why is this? We heard business leaders across the world describe how their early employment experiences shaped their learning agility, skills and knowledge, fundamentally preparing them for the world of work. This ranged from:

 

  • Working in a newsagent (Fiona Kendrick, Chief Executive and Chairman of Nestlé UK and Ireland) honing interpersonal skills and the true meaning of supply and demand
  • Working in McDonalds (Jill Huntley, Managing Director of Corporate Citizenship, Accenture) developing an appreciation for work ethic and the advancement one earns as a result
  • Delivering a paper round (Michael Davies, the Chief Executive of the UKCES) building trust with others and the value of team work

 

Interestingly, the UKCES report reveals that from over 90,000 organisations surveyed, nearly 25% of those who recruit school leavers cite lack of work experience or maturity as a key constraint in this population. This was closely followed by poor attitude or lack of motivation at 18%. By contrast, the technical side looks bright with only 4% citing poor numeracy and literacy skills as a barrier.

 

From my perspective, these findings imply a largely eager, technically able population of young people, hungry to enter the employment market but with no evidence to showcase their potential.

 

I left the event feeling that businesses are certainly striving to enable young people to enter their organisation at flexible levels. From the Nestlé Academy, to Google’s 3000 strong Internship programme, the initiatives are there.

 

My challenge is this: how do we assess young people, who do not have the employment history from which to build their personal business case?

 

Working with school leaver and graduate recruiters across sectors, such as professional services, FMCG and IT, I hear the same thing. ”We want talented, ambitious, hard working and agile individuals”.

 

While past experience has traditionally been a predictor of job success, at Capp we know from a decade of research that the study of one’s individual’s strengths, not what you have done, is a truer insight to a young person’s readiness to enter work.

 

This sits at the core of our recruitment methodology and for me, provides the how in addition to the what we can all do to address youth employment today.

 

Nestlé Academy Fast Start Programme Case Study

 

A great example of success in recruiting young people is the industry-leading Nestlé Academy Fast Start Programme, a three year scheme for school leavers. Capp worked in partnership with Nestlé to define the indicators of success and to design an assessment strategy capable of identifying individuals’ potential for success, without relying on candidates’ limited previous work experience. The three main challenges were:

  • To increase social mobility in the recruitment process – a programme that would enable anyone, regardless of their background the opportunity to ‘learn while you earn’.
  • To differentiate Fast Start from other school leaver programmes.
  • To identify candidates with high potential, not based on limited previous work experience.

 

The success of this scheme won Capp & Nestlé the Best Apprentice/School Leaver Recruitment Strategy Category at the Recruiter Awards 2014. To read about the business outcomes, please see more in our case study here.

 

For further information on strengths-based assessment, apprenticeships and young careers please contact Claire Marr, Client Services Manager at capp@capp.co or telephone +44 (0)2476 323 363 or Link In with me, Helen Dovey at uk.linkedin.com/in/helendovey

 

Follow @Capp_co on Twitter, LinkedIn & Facebook.

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Movements towards Good Career Guidance

Posted by: Nicky Garcea, CCO, Capp

 

Last week I joined 50 other stakeholders at a workshop exploring the ‘Good Career Guide Environment’ hosted by Capgemini and the Good Careers Guide. This remarkable event was facilitated by leaders from the Accelerated Learning Environment (ASE). Stakeholders included head teachers, teachers, career staff from schools and universities, the Association of Graduate Recruiters (AGR), and industry representatives for apprentices from organisations such as Barclays and National Grid.

 

Output from this three day event is helping to shape the Good Career Guide’s purpose and mission for all young people. Parts that fascinated me the most were the debates around:

  • How do we define what is a career?
  • What does ‘good’ guidance look like?

 

Video footage from students also clearly highlighted that many young people don’t know how to discover their strengths and talents beyond their school experience and academic qualifications. Something which at Capp we are dedicated to overcome through the career development and recruitment assessments available to all young people for free on Jobmi.com

 

Coinciding with the Good Career Guide event was the publication of the Good Career Guidance report by Gatsby. This report highlighted that many young people aren’t being made aware of the full range of options available to them. The report commissioned by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation, builds on the findings of Ofsted’s September 2013 Review and identifies serious gaps in current career provision.

 

The Gatsby report sets out eight practical recommendations on how to improve career guidance in England’s secondary schools, they included:

 

  1. A stable careers programme at every school and college
  2. Learning from career and labour market information
  3. Addressing the needs of each school student
  4. Linking curriculum learning to careers
  5. Encounters with employers and employees
  6. Experiences of workplaces
  7. Encounters with further and higher education
  8. Personal guidance

It is clear that there is a lot of work ahead of us if we are going to change young people’s experience of career guidance. But I believe there is reason to be optimistic. As the event last week demonstrated there are many multiple stakeholders willing to genuinely collaborate to provide young people with clearer access to employers and career opportunities in the years ahead.

 

Aside from the movements that are developing to address career guidance provision, we can all play our part. As employers, parents, aunts, uncles and even friends of young people, we all have chance to share our experience of work and start our own career dialogue.

 

Next week we will share with you the impact apprenticeships are playing in changing the employability of young people in the UK.

 

For further information on career development, recruitment assessments and the Jobmi employability and recruitment platform for young careers please contact Nicky Garcea at nicky.garcea@capp.co Tel: +44 (0) 02476 323 363

 

Please note that the Good Careers Guide website is being refreshed at the moment and you can find their site at www.goodcareersguide.co.uk in the near future

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Nestlé and Capp won the best Apprentice/School Leaver Recruitment Strategy Award at the Recruiter Awards 2014

Posted by: Nicky Garcea, CCO, Capp and Helen Dovey, Senior Psycholgist, Capp

 

 

It was an honour to be recognised by the Recruiter this week for Capp’s contribution to the Nestlé School Leaver programme. The evening was hosted by the Recruiter at Grosvenor House in London and was attended by ‘Recruitments’ great and good. We were delighted to be joined at our table by representatives from the Nestlé Academy and Talent team along with clients from Capgemini and Monsoon Accessorise.

 

 

 

In the above image from left to right: Nigel Wright (Nestlé), Tom Banham (Nestlé), Fiona Miller (Nestlé), Nicky Garcea (Capp), Helen Dovey (Capp), Richard Brooke (Nestlé).

 

We were thrilled that the Recruiter judges were impressed by Capp’s strengths-based assessment methodology.

“An example of a programme that has tangible value. A unique strengths-based assessment methodology sets this entry apart.” said Awards Judge: Tim Campbell MBE, Head of client services at Alexander Mann Solutions.

 

About the Nestlé Fast Start Programme

Nestlé launched their industry-leading Fast Start programme in 2013, a three year scheme providing school leavers with the opportunity to work in a salaried training role while studying for their degree in Professional Business Practice.

 

Capp worked in partnership with Nestlé to define the indicators of success and to design an assessment strategy capable of identifying individuals’ potential for success, without relying on candidates’ limited previous work experience.

 

Results that the programme has delivered back to Nestlé include:

 

  • 88% of stakeholders thought that the strengths-based approach was the best way to recruit school leavers and a further 88% thought the strengths-based approach differentiated Nestlé from other school leaver programmes.
  • 60% of candidates who applied to Fast Start and 55% of candidates who were successful in reaching Assessment Centre reported that their parents had not completed a university degree.
  • Moreover, 70% of candidates who applied to Fast Start attended a state-run or state funded school and 78% of candidates who were successful in reaching Assessment Centre attended a state-run or state funded school. This illustrates that the strengths-based assessment process is both reaching out to candidates from a more diverse social background and that the assessment process is not disadvantaging these candidates from progressing in the process.

 

To read more about our Capp’s approach and results, read our award winning case study here.

 

On behalf of the Capp team we would like to pay thanks to The Nestlé Academy team for being client partners who are happy to innovate; and we would like to congratulate all of the 2014 Recruiter Award Winners.

 

If you would like to know how Capp can help you to attract, select and develop early career talent then please contact Nicky Garcea at nicky.garcea@capp.co Tel: +44 (0) 02476 323 363

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

What Graduates Want – What is their 5 per Day?

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Chief Commercial Officer, Capp.

 

Graduates are different, graduates are hungry, graduates know what they want. These are the many opinions floating around graduate recruitment and development.

 

In the AGR Student Development Conference (13 March 2014), research was presented to test out what exactly is the real data on what graduates want and need to engage their hearts, not just their brilliant minds. Also what is the smallest thing we can all do today to increase graduate engagement at work tomorrow?

 

Research shows 90% of grads feel they deserve their dream job, 80% want regular feedback from their managers, 70% want more ‘me time’ at work. There appears to be a lot of ‘me’ in the data, give me time, give me space, recognise and value me. So how does this compare with other generations of workers and indeed other Gen Y’s? The data shows less concern for customers, job security and reward than older generations, yet like Gen Y’s there are five big conditions to engage and retain them.

 

  • Recognition: more than other employees grads need very open regular feedback, being valued and very regularly is critical to them – or they will seek it elsewhere.
  • Reputation: they will work and engage with employers of high repute, more than other generations who needed / wanted job security, we have to prove our value to them.
  • Empowerment: this is about trusting grads to get on with important things – they will go the extra mile or ten for employers who give them large scope and long reach.
  • Communications: more than other employees they need more communications, they have a deep hunger to know what’s going on – so we need to feed this in specific ways.
  • Careers: it not the job they want it’s the ladder, and they want to see how older grads have really made good– like leaders who once were grads – learning from/working with them.

 

The opportunity is there for the taking, and as if to remind us what happens if we do not provide – there is a major drop, like a stone in grad engagement within a year or so of joining. Graduate engagement drops from typical highs of 70% or even 80% to lows of 50%-60% at best with all their other expectations performance and loyalty.

 

So what can be done? These opportunities are already nailed by many top grad recruiters. Whether by design, data or desirability, there are many great examples.

 

First, engage them early, pre-hire not post hire. Second, message your schemes high on regular recognition – show case studies of grads receiving internal awards from senior leaders, working with leaders, position the recognition your company is getting too, external awards for initiatives, innovation, growth, focussing on Talent for example. Third, give early responsibility, working on key senior high value projects imperative to the business yet match their strengths. Communicate within a social grad network so they learn and grow from others’ successes, so building a future social leaders network. Finally showcase extreme performance, positioning success and reputation of ex grad scheme employees.

 

These and the already many innovations in place we could all share are not just ‘good ideas’, they are practices that feed the few deep essentials that engage grad hearts and minds.

 

I you would like to discuss graduate recruitment and development further, please contact me directly on: Capp +44 (0) 2476 232 363 or Link In with me, send me an in-mail, and I’ll contact you: uk.linkedin.com/in/vernonbryce

 

Nicky Garcea, Chief Customer Officer, Capp and Vernon Bryce, Chief Commercial Officer, Capp presented ‘Engaging the Hearts and Minds of Graduates’ at the AGR Student Development Conference, 13 March 4014.

www.agr.org.uk

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Capp launch the Jobmi Manifesto

 

We are proud to launch the Jobmi Manifesto today, on the opening day of National Apprenticeship Week and National Careers Week.
 

Jobmi is the employability and recruitment platform from Capp. It connects young people and employers. Young people are matched to the company’s success criteria using a range of Jobmi assessments that are free to access. Employers find candidates who are pre-screened and pre-qualified, and a fit for their culture, role and future.
 

Through the Jobmi Manifesto, we are building a stakeholder coalition to improve job prospects and recruitment practices for young people.
 

In the Jobmi Manifesto, you will see how we are working to:
 

Excite employers
Energise schools, colleges and universities
Engage young people
Enable strengths
Empower social mobility

 

Show your support for the Jobmi Manifesto here.

If you really want to help, please forward this to your colleagues and friends who want to support young people and early careers.
 

Together we will make a difference to the employability and recruitment prospects of young people.
 

Thank you
 

Capp
 

www.capp.co/

www.jobmi.com

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

It’s Trending: Graduate Recruitment is on the Rise

Posted By: Nicky Garcea and Gurpal Minhas
 
2014 started well for graduates when the High Fliers Research reported that we could expect a 9% rise in graduate recruitment equating to around 1,400 extra jobs.
 
As the BBC have reported today there is a consensus emerging that early career and graduate recruitment is on the rise, and can only be a good thing when last year’s statistics suggested that one in every ten graduates was unemployed.
 
Stephen Isherwood, CEO for the Association of Graduate Recruiters (AGR) reported at their AGM last Monday that employer members of the AGR were also reporting a significant rise in graduate recruitment in 2013 and this trend was predicted to continue well into 2014.
 
Stephen reported the following key trends from the survey:
 
• Graduate recruitment was up by 4.3% in 2013 and is expected to rise by 10.2% in 2014.
• Industries that were seeing the greatest rise in graduate vacancies include: IT/Telecom, Public Sector, Banking and Energy.
• London, South East and West Midlands are seeing the greatest growth in graduate vacancies.
• 50% of AGR members surveyed now have a school leaver programme and a further 15.4% expect to launch one in 2014.
• The number of applicants per vacancy varies between Graduates’s (85) and School Leavers (25).
 
The AGR data also echo’s the global graduate recruitment trends being reported out of the US from the Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC). GMAC’s annual poll of employers conducted in 2013, covers 211 employers at 185 companies in 33 countries worldwide.
 
GMAC have recently reported:
 
• More than three-quarters of employers that plan to hire business school graduates in 2014 expect to maintain or increase their hiring levels compared with 2013.
• 87% of employers plan to maintain (43%) or increase (43%) headcounts for new MBA hires.
• Salaries in 2014 expected to increase for Business Graduates; a majority of employers seeking to hire business school graduates in 2014 (between 51% and 58%) plan to increase annual base salary levels for new hires at or above the rate of inflation.
 
These international shoots of early career recruitment recovery are good news for the many school leavers and graduates seeking to be employed.
 
The challenge for many recruiters right now is how to identify and assess the most exemplar apprentice and graduates to ensure they recruit the highest calibre of applicants whilst attending into increased candidate numbers. Many of our graduate recruiter clients saw their applications double in 2013.
 
Capp’s recruitment solution ‘Strengths Selector’ successfully supported Barclays Investment Bank, EY, Morrisons, Microsoft and Nestlé recruit diverse and socially mobile early career talent in 2013 and into 2014. If you would like to know more about our work and view our case studies with these clients please contact us at nicky.garcea@capp.co Gurpal.minhas@capp.co or follow us on twitter @nickygarcea @gurpalminhas.

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Getting the best from a team development session

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Strengths Consultant

 

At Capp we are very excited to be launching our new Team Profile this week. It still contains some of our clients’ favourite features, but with some added extras we are particularly proud of, such as the Realise2 SWOT Analysis supporting the bigger picture for the team.

 

As you may know, Realise2 is our strengths identification tool, taken over 70,000 times, enabling individuals to perform better, reach their goals and find engagement in their roles. It helps people understand strengths they use often (realised strengths), those they draw on less often; (unrealised strengths), as well as areas of less energy (learned behaviours) and some good old fashioned honesty around what we don’t do well (weaknesses).

 

Working with teams’ strengths can be a powerful experience for all concerned, however, there are some key tips I want to share with you whether you are a leader, manager or facilitator of a team development session:-

  1. Be clear on your objectives: From the start, be very clear what the session goals are. Whether it is to support a change, understand roles and relationships or to drive a goal, don’t deviate from what you set out to do.
  2. Preparation: As a trusted facilitator, prepare for your session well, understanding all the team dynamics and their context. You wouldn’t expect any less from Capp, but the new Team Profile is packed with really useful data for your team. How will you drive this on the day to achieve results?
  3. Keep it simple: Don’t try to cram too much in the session and keep exercises simple. Often teams will simply relish in realising new things about each other so have confidence in your approach.  You may not need to do a great deal on the actual day itself to hear the light bulbs go off and the pins drop. Share your own strengths experiences; encourage the sharing of strengths and use the language – watch the results.
  4. Encourage ownership of data: I personally find the learned behaviours in team dynamics the most fascinating. Watching teams communicate about those things they thought were strengths in each other, and understanding how they can be relied on less (they are not as energising as strengths) is a rewarding experience. We often recognise each others’ strengths and weaknesses, but it is common to be caught out here. Support team members to know what they want to be known for in the team.
  5. Next steps: Don’t leave the room without establishing what the next steps are for everyone as an individual, but also collectively as a team. Of course, they may be very simple and often this is better as actions will be achievable, i.e. putting something on the agenda for the next meeting or displaying strengths profiles. When will the team be following up on the actions? Perhaps, delegate the actions list to the person with Personal Responsibility as a strength!

 

So, next time you are working with a team, consider how  Capp’s new Team Profile can support performance, engagement and, of course, improve communication.

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Maximising performance through strengths: An illustration of strengths-based performance management

Posted by: Emma Trenier, Senior Psychologist, Capp.

 

 

If delivering performance is the number one objective for all managers, isn’t it about time that we got it right?

Amongst managers, the term ‘performance management’ can conjure up images of bureaucracy, paperwork and having ‘difficult conversations’. As occupational psychologists and HR practitioners, it is not uncommon to work with demoralised managers struggling to complete performance reviews in time for internal deadlines.

 

From experience, managers can believe that they only need to focus on ‘performance management’ through formal structures, and therefore lack the motivation to engage in the daily tasks of giving feedback, challenge and support. Despite these challenges, however, there are reliable benefits for those who get it right.

 

To read our research on the benefits and challenges of adopting a strengths-focused approach to performance management, please see my recent article here in The British Psychological Society (BPS) Assessment & Development Matters, Vol 5 (No 4) Winter 2013. Maximising performance through strengths: An illustration of strengths-based performance management.

 

To find out more about how we can help you find the right talent:

Call +44 (0) 2476 323 363

Email capp@capp.co

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Your New Year’s Resolution – Give One Day

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged
by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character”

Martin Luther King Junior, 28 August 1963

 

One day you were young and people cared about you. You had dreams, ambition, hope and energy. In school, your teachers worked hard to realise your potential, teaching you things that they knew you needed to know. You probably disagreed and preferred to get back into your music, sport, seeing your friends and having a social life. Nevertheless, people around you pressed on with your development, whether parent, sibling, neighbour, gang, friend, person of worship. So you had a few breaks. You had a few setbacks too, but you cracked on, hoping that your drive, your hopes and aims would lead to something. They did.

 

Now you are older and you have made a few steps forward. You are in work. You have a career. You have options and pathways ahead of you. You get holidays. You travel. You learn. You grow. You even have days of learning and growing. You are online. The world’s web is open to you. You win.

 

Now you are older and made a few steps forward, you may wonder how the young of today are doing. Well friends, more than 430,000 young people are facing long-term unemployment in the UK. Across Europe, North Africa and the Middle East the numbers are no less, and no less worrying. A forgotten generation who wonder who will care for them, their dreams, ambitions, hopes and energy. Who will help realise their potential? Who will invest in them as others invested in you? They’re into sport, music and the people around them whether parent, sibling, neighbour, gang, friend, person of worship do care, yet no breaks.

 

‘’With more than 430,000 young people in the UK facing long-term unemployment, it is frightening to think about the young lives that could be wasted if we fail to give them the urgent support they need’’

Martina Milburn CBE, Chief Executive, The Prince’s Trust

 

Let’s imagine one day, somebody gave them a day. Just one day of their time. And it started feeding their hunger, their need to grow and succeed like you. Then another gave a day. They started to invest one day a month, offering this time to young early career people in their business, work-place and neighbourhood. The skills, knowledge and expertise were transferable and then replicable. Yet more was to come. In transferring this, those giving their time began to gain insights experiences and skills. Their work improved, their engagement and innovation improved. Transfer made a difference.

 

One day. That’s all it took. And because one day some time ago somebody invested in them, one day made a difference. Giving one day made them who they were. That one day was all it took. It mattered then to you in those days and it matters now. Imagine your one day will make a difference, one day.

 

“The statistics are terrifying – the United Nations International Labour Organisation (ILO)
estimates that close to 75 million 15-24 year olds are out of work”

Hannah Barnes, BBC News, Radio 4, 12 September 2012

 
 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Managing Change: Resilience is Fertile (with apologies to The Borg)

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

“We are the Borg.

Your biological and technological distinctiveness will be assimilated. Resistance is futile1

(Ascribed to The Borg, an alien race featured in Star Trek the Next Generation)*

 

One of my favourite lectures in my undergrad psych degree featured ‘double approach avoidance theory’ (DAAT) thanks to the genius of Kurt Lewin, in which he theorises that many decisions in life (like marriage, moving house, career planning perhaps) confront us with conflicts, In DAAT, both goals have advantages and disadvantages causing great conflict.

 

In lay terms, DAAT of course means everyone can win yet everyone can lose, very convenient I used to think , both positive and negative, similtaneous yin and yang, balance and counterbalance in each choice at the same time, everyone has their cake and eats it; or not, it seems. Brilliantly painful and yet pleasurable at the same time I thought, and so is managing change I since learned.

 

How so? Managing Change is probably up there in the one-time Top 10 of business imperatives, along with decision making in global versus local markets, make or buy manufacture, invest not invest, organic or acquisitional growth.  Even so, within the Top 10, change is vastly under-rated both in its complexity and dynamics. Change is both threat and opportunity, managing change is a conflict between sticking with the advantages of the known status quo and the potential advantages and disadvantages in the alternative. Hence, ‘double approach-avoidance theory’.

 

This has major implications for hiring promoting and positioning people in organisations. Do we choose people who embrace change or resist it? Do we decide for singularity or plurality? Those who will resist change when opportunity presents or risks the jump? The evidence is clear.

 

In managing change, opportunity and threat is ever-present, thus embracing yet resisting change is fertile, hence ‘resilience is fertile’. In recruiting for change we need the wise insight to recognise the options, their advantages and disadvantages, the courage to hold the double approach avoidance dilemma in our thoughts, yet lead our people to the vision which inspires and sustains.

 

To find out how Capp can help your organisation manage change, please contact me directly: vernon.bryce@capp.co, connect with me on LinkedIn uk.linkedin.com/in/vernonbryce or call +44 (0) 2476 323 363.

 

*Author’s note: The Borg are a fictitious alien race, unlike Star Trek which all of us know is not!

1Source: Wikipedia

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS