Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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Downward mobility, opportunity hoarding and the ‘glass floor’: Latest SMCP Commission Report

Posted by: Alex Linley, CEO, Capp

 

The Social Mobility and Child Poverty Commission just released their latest report – ‘Downward mobility, opportunity hoarding and the ‘glass floor” – https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/447575/Downward_mobility_opportunity_hoarding_and_the_glass_floor.pdf.

 

This report examines the relationships between family background, childhood cognitive skills and adult success in the labour market, using a sample of several thousand people from the British Birth Cohort Study 1970, who have been tracked since their births over the course of a single week in 1970, and were aged 42 at the time of the latest data collection.

 

The study set out to compare and contrast the outcomes and trajectories of distinct groups on a two-by-two matrix within the Birth Cohort Study 1970. First, participants were classified as high attainers or low attainers in relation to labour market success, and second, they were classified as coming from high or low socioeconomic and educational backgrounds. The focus of the research was to understand how people achieved high attainer status in their labour market outcomes, and if this was different for people from low or high socioeconomic backgrounds respectively.

 

The findings were clear and consistent. People from lower socioeconomic backgrounds were less likely to achieve higher labour market outcomes (that is, high level jobs) than people from higher socioeconomic backgrounds, even when controlling for their childhood cognitive ability. This is believed to be related to the wider network of factors that influence labour market success, so-called ‘signalling’ effects that have been identified by economists, and include confidence, self-presentation and conduct in social settings.

 

The research indicated that having better-educated parents, who were in higher level jobs themselves, and could therefore provide more resources, as well as more access to opportunities, served to protect their less able children and young people from higher socioeconomic backgrounds (so-called ‘opportunity hoarding’). As a result, whether deliberately intended or otherwise, this also served to restrict access to more able children and young people from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, who did not have access to these resources (so-called ‘glass floor’ effects).

 

The SMCPC report calls for changes in recruitment processes to address these biases, something which Capp has been delivering consistently through our work in strengths-based recruitment for a number of years. Strengths-based recruitment assesses a person’s innate ability and potential, depending far less on their ability to give examples that can only have been honed through their access to opportunity to that point (e.g., a typical competency question such as, “Tell me about a time when you have held a position of responsibility?”)

 

This levelling of the playing field, providing access to opportunity for all, enabling talent, drive and meritocracy, rather than rewarding privilege and connection, is also core to Jobmi, the job matching place. Jobmi provides free access to online assessments, developmental feedback and practice tests, while also enabling people from all backgrounds to complete assessments and be matched to job opportunities on the basis of the profile that Jobmi builds up about them. The Jobmi approach, using this insightful assessment of talent and ability, overcomes the biases inherent in ‘signalling’ effects, and provides more equal access to opportunity for all.

 

With these improvements in talent assessment, the measurement of potential, and job matching technology, it truly is possible to do a lot more that addresses the challenges, and also the opportunities, of promoting and enabling greater social mobility across Britain. In doing so, we benefit individuals, the economy and society as a whole.

 

 

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Developing Business Critical Capabilities in Early Talent

Posted by: Dr Reena Jamnadas

 

Today I spoke to a candidate (let’s call her Subo) to discuss feedback on the strengths that enabled her to be successful in an assessment centre for an apprenticeship scheme. Subo was excited to receive feedback and brainstormed all the ways she imagined growing and developing within her first few months – she almost had to hold herself back once reality hit that she hadn’t actually started the apprenticeship yet!

 

Set against the backdrop of politicians pledging to create opportunities for young people to get into work through apprenticeships, this paints a promising picture about how eager young talent are to apply their skills in the workplace.

 

On the flip side, last week, the CIPD published an article emphasising the need for learning and development in organisations to deliver outcomes that are more acutely aligned to business strategy. Developing apprentices, graduates and ‘emerging leaders’ to develop capabilities that will deliver future business requirements is a critical challenge; yet it’s this very population of talent that are a force for culture change.

 

For early talent like Subo, whilst making an impact from ‘day one’ matters, being equipped to develop a rich career is equally important.  Doing both through developing the capabilities that the business needs is absolutely essential.

 

Often, this means building capabilities for future roles that negotiate unchartered territory. With many new roles, e.g., in digital and technology, evolving at pace, the key is to develop both core capabilities and an understanding of what a diverse range of career pathways would look like.

 

At Capp, we recognise the need to enable apprentices, graduates and emerging leaders to assess their own current and future capabilities so that they can strategise about their next leap. We do this by providing emerging talent and managers with assessment data about their current capability, future capacity and how these could map to potential career pathways.

 

The good news for young people is that organisations such as Lloyds Banking Group and Standard Chartered Bank are already using such assessments to develop ‘next level’ capabilities amongst apprentices and graduates. This means that young people like Subo can take responsibility for directing their own growth and careers – and managers have the data to support them in the right ways. We also support organisations to develop talent through action-focused interventions, workshop based learning, and high impact talent centres.

 

For more information about Capp’s approach to talent management, please contact the development solutions team on +44 (0) 2476 323363.

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AGR Graduate Development Conference 2015

Posted by Emma Trenier

 

It was great to attend this year’s AGR Graduate Development conference yesterday and meet with graduate development professionals from a wide range of businesses. Representatives from Transport for London, Thomson Reuters, Morrisons, John Lewis, Fujitsu, and the Bank of England were there, amongst over 200 others, and it was great to hear about both best practice and challenges from these experienced development professionals.

 

Francesca Campalani (Senior HR and Brand Manager at Lloyds Banking Group) and I ran a session called ‘Test the Strength of your graduate development’ where we shared the graduate development journey that we are currently delivering in partnership.

 

Following the morning’s challenge by Marcus Orlovsky for organisations to take the risk of allowing greater complexity and less support, we discussed how LBG have built gaming principles into their programme- allowing for high challenge and opportunity, lots of freedom and fun, and the potential to win prizes.

 

We also shared why LBG now both recruit for and develop strengths rather than competencies for their early talent. The top reasons include a desire to differentiate themselves as an employer of choice, reduce the recruitment of company clones (!), and provide recognition to every new recruit.

 

Finally, we discussed the role of managers in developing early talent potential. With strong research evidence suggesting that strengths focused conversations lead to increased performance, we shared how we have engaged with line managers- through graduate led conversations, good communication, and supporting information and tools.  This engagement has led to 97% of managers having strengths conversations with their graduates and apprentices.

 

To view our presentation, please click here

 

To view a case study describing the Graduate and Apprentice Journey at Lloyds Banking Group, please click here

 

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Five Steps to Building a Winning Team

Posted By: Emma Trenier

 

Last month we spent the day with 280 Lloyds Banking Group (LBG) graduates at the spectacular launch of this year’s Responsible Business Challenge.

 

Sponsored by HR Director Stephen Smith, along with many other representatives from the emerging talent team and the business, this event prepared the graduates for their challenge of collectively raising at least £250k for Children in Need.

 

With last year’s graduates bringing in at least £200k more than that, the bar is set high. So, to start the teams off on the right foot, Capp brought the teams through the first five steps of building high performing teams, learning from last year’s winners at every stage.

 

Here is the essence of what we shared:

 

1.      Rules of engagement

The first step to building a winning team is to be clear on your team rules of engagement. These are the rules that every team member must stick to at all costs, e.g., must attend all meetings, must be on time, must contribute the actions promised, must be respectful of other team members, must stay on topic.

 

It is always helpful to include a rule which outlines the reasons a non- contributor can be kicked out of the group. This way, you won’t fall into the trap of being hindered by some people’s poor performance.

 

2.      Begin with the end in mind

Next we spoke about the ‘Duvet Shove’, the principle that every team needs to have a shared purpose and vision that will (hypothetically) drag them out of bed in the morning (shove the duvet off!), or help them focus on the challenge when everyday priorities get in the way.

 

The graduates’ next challenge was to define their vision- for some this was to promote what Children in Need do, for others it was to run an event or activity every single week of the challenge.

 

3.      The right group

The third step to building a high performing team is to define the team roles that are necessary at each stage of the project, bearing in mind that these will change many times. Understanding the strengths and passions of each team member helps to give every person the opportunity to contribute their best.

 

The graduates considered their strengths and the roles they would most like to take- referring to the Lloyds Banking Group strengths definitions for ideas.

 

4.      Set the pace and structure

Meetings! We discussed the pain that comes from meetings with no purpose or no outcomes. For all meetings we shared the importance of considering:

 

-          TYPE- what is the meeting for?

-          STRUCTURE- how much structure is needed?

-          OBJECTIVES- what are they?

-          AGENDA- what were our agreed actions from the last meeting and what do we need to decide today?

-          ADVANCE- what should be done in advance?

-          ON TIME- Start, stay, finish on time

-          MOMENTUM- never cancel a meeting without rearranging

 

5.      Generate ideas

Finally, we shared tools for idea generation that will help every team think of winning ideas. Through methods of divergent thinking (do this first), and then methods of convergent thinking (do this after a coffee), the teams were able to select their best ‘first burst’ ideas. The graduates also learnt that an IDEA is different from a THOUGHT. For a thought to become an idea it needs to be developed into an actionable suggestion that somebody who did not think of it could deliver.

 

For LBG, the principles of gamification are central to making the graduate journey impactful- learning socially, through fun, and winning prizes is all part of what makes their development approach stand out. The Responsible Business Challenge is the first of a series of competitive and stretching ‘games’ still to come this year!

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The Four Secrets of Making an Impact

Posted By:  Reena Jamnadas

 

As we are partnering with Lloyds Banking Group to deliver their Graduate and Apprentice Development Journeys, we recently ran a session with 40 incredible apprentices about how to create an amazing personal impact.

 

The apprentices enjoyed the four secrets to making an impact- here’s a snapshot of what we shared:

 

Creating a positive impression can be the difference between starting a relationship on the right foot or the wrong foot. This is never truer than in the workplace. Whether you’re the CEO or a new member of a team, it’s as the saying goes: ‘People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel’

 

What do you want to be known for? What impression do you want to leave on others? How can you create a lasting impression on the people that you work with?

 

Secret 1: It’s not just what you say, it’s how you say it

Have you ever met someone for the first time, and although they said ‘Great to meet you’, their body language didn’t quite match up? When you speak to others, it’s important that you are authentic and confident in the way that you come across. This might be in the way that you give a genuine smile, give a firm handshake, or have strong eye-contact.

 

Action: Think about what you would say if you had 60 seconds with a senior colleague in a lift who asked you what you most enjoy about your work.

 

Secret 2: Deliver quick wins

Quick wins allow you to show others what you can do – a small action that makes a big difference and helps you to stand out. Think about how you can make somebody else’s job easier. You can deliver a quick win by thinking about what you can improve, fix, or resolve quickly.

 

Action: What immediate opportunity do you have to volunteer for something? Think about who you will approach and how you can help.

 

Secret 3: Build your network

Knowing who you have in your network can help you identify people that can help you achieve your goals. Write down people you can go to for support, knowledge, to make connections in or outside of school – it may be colleagues, teachers, relatives, or friends. Remember, it’s important to practice giving as well as taking from people you know.

 

Action: Draw a map of people in your network. Write down how you can strengthen these connections through ways such as offering your help, connecting on LinkedIn, or sharing knowledge.

 

Secret 4: Excel at being a learner

Successful people never stop taking their growth seriously. This is a perfect time in your life to think about new talents or knowledge that you want to gain – think about what new things you need to learn to help reach your goals. Which sources of information will help you? Who can you approach?

 

Action: Brainstorm a ‘wish list’ of what you would like to learn over the next three months. Create an action plan of how you will make it happen: sources of information, people to approach, resources you need.

 

Which of these secrets will you apply today or share with an apprentice you work with?  

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Early Talent Development Survey- Take part now!

Early Talent Development Survey- Take part now!

 

We are pleased to inform you that the Capp Early Talent Development Survey is now live, ready for you and your organisation to take part in!

 

Existing research reveals that 98% of young employees* believe they are responsible for driving their own development. The fact that young employees- our apprentices, interns and graduates- believe in ‘driving their own development’ is phenomenal. It suggests a generation crammed full of initiative, personal responsibility and growth orientation- strengths that we see in bucket loads amongst the apprentices and graduates we recruit and develop.

 

The question, however, is which direction are they driving their development?

 

We have created the Early Talent survey to provide direction for organisations that employ apprentices, interns and graduates. We want to reveal which development activities are most important for developing core capabilities and how early talent, their managers and the business can prioritise the activities that matter most.

 

We want to reveal how development priorities differ for apprentices, interns and graduates and identify the areas where expectations differ most from common experience.

 

Why? To help early talent drive their own development in the right direction- knowing where to focus their energies.

 

Take part now!

 

By inviting your apprentices, graduates, graduate alumni and early talent managers to take part, you will receive the following benefits:

  • Early access to our survey findings, describing trends in early talent development behaviour across industries and sectors (all organisations will be anonymous within our published results)
  • Survey results for your own organisation- sharing both high level themes and full survey data and crucially what to do next
  • Analysis of the impact of your development approach on your early talent’s engagement, loyalty, and perception of you as an employer
  • Your data benchmarked against other organisations- giving you a rating of how well your organisation is meeting the needs and preferences of your early talent.

 

To encourage completion of the survey, every person who takes part will enter into a draw to win a £150 cash prize.

 

What to do next?

If you think your organisation might like to take part, drop Emma Trenier or Gurpal Minhas a line at emma.trenier@capp.co or gurpal.minhas@capp.co  – we can tell you more and discuss the best way of sharing the survey with your employees and collating your business results.

 

Alternatively, if you would like to personally take part:  

 

  1. Follow this link if you are an apprentice,  intern, graduate or ex- graduate
  2. Follow this link you directly or indirectly manage early talent employees

 

We look forward to sharing our results with you in the coming months.

 

*aged 16- 22

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Advice to parents of school leavers – top 4 tips

Posted by: Emma Trenier, Senior Psychologist, Capp.

 

 

 

Every Saturday I love to read The Inventory in the FT Weekend. In twenty questions (the same each week), experts in their field are asked about their lives and careers, including whether they had a mentor, whether ambition or talent matters more and whether they consider their carbon footprint. The question I love the most though is:

 

If your 20 year old self could see you now, what would they think?

 

Apart from writer P.J O’Rourke who said he wouldn’t even notice himself, almost every other interviewee has said that their younger self would be pleased to see that they had taken risks, followed their dreams and fought to succeed against the odds.

 

So, parents, whilst we rush around helping our young people to master the basics of workplace etiquette and summer job politics, we must not lose sight of our broader role – to help them take risks and dream big dreams.

 

To start with,

  1. Coach them, don’t instruct them. Build their confidence and motivation by helping them work out what they want to do and why. Help them imagine the benefits they will get if they go for it.
  2. Open their horizons. Help set up experiences, e.g., watching movies, visiting friend’s workplaces or reaching out to potential mentors, that will inspire them to believe they can achieve great things.  
  3. Focus on their strengths. Help them courageously follow a route that plays to their strengths- their areas of greatest potential (They can take a free Strengths Test on Jobmi which will give them some great insight).
  4. Build their resilience. I love the ‘Worth it Guide’ booklet (free to download) designed by young people to help others find their flow, focus on the positive and build their confidence.

 

And, finally, why not ask them,

 

If your 20 year old self could see you now, what would they say you should do?

 

If you’re helping your child, or advising friends who have children this A Level Results Day, two essential places to check are: The Telegraph Clearing Hub http://clearing.telegraph.co.uk/, and UCAS, who offer telephone support for school leavers and parents on 0371 468 0468, and for latest news and updates see their website http://www.ucas.com/ 

 

For more information on Jobmi and strengths development please call Capp on +44(0)2476 323 363 or connect with me, Emma Trenier, on LinkedIn

 

 

 

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Spotting strengths in children and early careers

Posted by: Emma Trenier, Senior Psychologist, Capp. 

 

My three year old son packs spare clothes in his rucksack for his baby brother in case he spills something. Strange behaviour for a three year old but, I believe, one of the signs of his emerging strength in Prevention.

 

Parenting is often so fraught with worry and ambition. In the words of Norah Ephron (When Harry met Sally) “suddenly, one day there was this thing called parenting. Parenting was serious. Parenting was fierce. Parenting was solemn. Parenting was a participle, like ‘going’ and ‘doing’ and ‘crusading’ and ‘worrying’. It was active, it was energetic, it was unrelenting.”

 

Stopping to take time to observe our children’s strengths emerging is quite the opposite of this. It is natural, it is energising and it is uplifting. It is about allowing children to experiment and explore to find their strengths for themselves.

 

In Alex Linley’s bestselling book Average to A+ he talks about the ways in which adults can spot strengths in children and, in doing so plant ‘golden seeds’- through noticing and pointing out things that they are good at. It was Charles Handy who popularised this term and he tells us that almost all high achievers were given a golden seed in the first 20 years of their life.

 

Take time to spot strengths in your children these school holidays. As they leave school and discover their careers it will be having the confidence to build and excel in these areas that makes the greatest difference to them.

 

The good news for them, and us as parents, is that employers are recognising the importance of spotting strengths in early careers. Through strengths-based recruitment and development, organisations such as Nestlé and Morrisons and Microsoft are leading the way in selecting their youngest people for the strengths they possess – the source of their great potential.

 

For information on how to spot and develop the strengths of individuals and teams, please call Capp on +44(0)2476 323 363 or connect with me, Emma Trenier, on LinkedIn

 

 

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Winning through your strengths

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Strengths Consultant, Capp.

 

With the Commonwealth Games in full swing, I thought it would be great to share with you ways in which we can all be part of a winning team by using our strengths. Referring to the strengths and Strengths Families from Capp’s online strengths identification tool, Realise2, what do you bring to situations that make a winning combination?

 

Competitive: Let us start with the most obvious. You love winning and this will usually be the only acceptable option for you as it probably hurts to lose! You are used to leading and being part of a winning team.  Competitive was one of the top weaknesses in the UK in our Realise2 study so consider how can you support others and role model your talent to encourage others’ competitiveness.

 

Motivation:  What are your motivation strengths and how will these deliver your competitive goals? If you have Work Ethic or Persistence, you can put the time, energy and effort into keeping going to make sure you achieve success. If you have Drive you will push yourself to win as you love achieving the demanding goals you have set yourself. Those with a sense of Adventure will compete successfully by pushing the boundaries and achieving the impossible.

 

Thinking: If you are naturally gifted in your brainpower, what thinking strengths can help you win? You may want to come up with the newest or most creative idea in your organisation. Perhaps your Judgement helps you make winning decisions or your organisational strengths of Planful or Order make sure you get to the top of your game with the right resources and in a timely manner.

 

Relationships:  If people are your focus you might not have thought too much about winning but your skill at getting the best from people will help deliver winning targets and goals through others. If you are emotionally connected with others use this talent to pick up on clues of others strengths and weaknesses to channel their energy in the right direction. If you are the natural Connector, use your network to put the winning team or resources together.

 

Being: Some of the Being strengths are all about ‘Making a Difference’ for example, Mission, Legacy, Service and Moral Compass. By aligning your passions and values together with your goals, it won’t be long before your commitment to the task sees you outperforming others and driving teams forward positively.

 

Communication:  The key to getting others on board to deliver performance. With Narrator as a strength, your talent for storytelling and anecdotes is a powerful and convincing message to others as to why they should outperform. Perhaps you offer the Counterpoint, always looking for alternatives so you can achieve success another way if you come across challenges. The ability to use your Explainer and Scribe to avoid jargon and make sure the whole team understands their individual and team goals will be a powerful combination.

 

So, the next time you are working towards a winning goal, compete in a way that plays to your strengths and you are far more likely to maintain your engagement and get to the result you want.

 

Realise2 is the leading online strengths identification and development tool, used by 80,000+ to unlock the potential of individuals and teams.

 

To find out more about how using strengths can help your organisation find and retain the right talent, call Capp on +44(0)2476 323 363.

 

 

Follow @Capp_co on TwitterLinkedIn & Facebook.

 

 

 

 

 

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AGR Conference 2014 – All Good Reasons – to Implement Strengths

Posted by: Ben Jackson, Chief Solutions Officer, Capp.

 

 

Liverpool recently played new host to the ‘AGR Student Recruitment Conference 2014’, providing two days of insight and networking around understanding more about those at an early career stage.

 

It was a great pleasure to attend and to be involved in this year’s annual conference, which was expertly hosted and organised by the AGR team.

 

Day one saw us enjoy welcoming delegates to two completely packed Masterclass Sessions entitled ‘Turning Early Years Attraction and Recruitment on its Head’, which allowed us to showcase some of the remarkable achievements strengths assessment has allowed for two of our clients, Nestlé and Morrisons.

 

Supported by Nestle’s Entry Level Recruitment Manager – Tom Banham and Hannah Porter, Graduate Resourcing Business Partner for Morrisons, our own Chief Customer Officer, Nicky Garcea narrated our partners’ respective journey’s to date, as they individually evidenced the benefits that implementing a strengths focussed approach has had on their respective businesses.

 

Both the sessions allowed for audience participation over and above just typical Q&A and a 60 second interaction with the person you were sat next to was all it took to begin to understand what strengths-based interviewing is all about – with the further recognition of how easily this can be achieved on video!

 

An informative and educational handout not only contained a free access code to take the Realise2 Strengths Identification Test (www.realise2.com) but also a simple guide that explains how individual strengths are accounted and recognised.

 

In addition to sharing these useful tools, we took the opportunity to showcase Jobmi, the premier platform for job-seeker discovery and guidance – supporting people in understanding what type of career is best suited to their strengths (www.jobmi.com).

 

Excitingly for us, the questions from the floor in both classes and those asked by people who came up to us afterwards, really did highlight the fact that more and more people are ‘getting it’. Strengths-based assessment has got some serious momentum and the appetite amongst those in attendance was plain to see.

 

In summary it was a great couple of days and a great opportunity for us show how strengths-based assessment has demonstrated time and time again to deliver cost savings across the recruitment process, a higher quality of candidate at each stage of the process and a better fit and more productive employee into the workplace.

 

As The Strengths Specialists, we’d be delighted to talk to you more about how strengths assessment and development can make a huge impact in your business.

 

If you would like further information on the results shared by Tom and Hannah, please get in touch to request a copy of their case studies and also a copy of the Masterclass slide deck.

 

Please contact Capp on +44(0)2476 323 363 or connect with me, Ben Jackson, Chief Solutions Officer at Capp uk.linkedin.com/in/bensjackson

 

 

For read some recent AGR Magazine articles about our client’s Morrisons and Nestlé please see the below:

 

Morrisons

AGR Graduate Recruiter magazine Oct-Nov 2013: Jumping the Queue Carla Murray, Graduate Resourcing Manager, talks about how in two years Morrisons jumped from no graduate presence to making it to The Times Top 100 Graduate Employers List… See pages 6-7.

 

Nestlé

AGR Graduate Recruiter magazine Dec-Jan 2014: A Battle of Wills Tom Banham, Nestlé Academy Recruitment Manager, shares his five reasons how Nestlé has benefitted from a strengths-based process… See pages 26-28

 

 

 

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