Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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Strengths

Reflections from the Bright Futures Employability Conference

Posted by: Rachel Roberts, Capp

 

Last week I had the pleasure of attending the Bright Futures Employability event in Birmingham, which featured employers, students and school pupils all sharing ideas on the theme of youth employability. There were some fantastic speakers, including Francesca Campalani from Lloyds Banking Group who gave a passionate talk sharing her vision for employability and how this has changed over the years. Another of the keynote speakers was Capp’s CEO, Alex Linley, whose talk explored strengths and the vital importance of knowing and deploying your strengths to full effect. In the world of modern recruitment it has never been so important to have solid self-awareness , so that when young people are applying for roles they can share their strengths in a confident and passionate manner.

 

One of the other main themes I took from the event was about technology and innovation, as we see the rise of fresh approaches in the recruitment space, including the move to video interviewing by a number of large organisations. To really maximise the use of new technology when moving through the recruitment process, we heard a lot about the importance of self-awareness in young people. Knowing their strengths and skills means that young people are able to be more effective and confident when showcasing themselves. This will undoubtedly lead to them having a higher degree of employability and enable them to get the best role possible.

 

Bright Futures has committees across the UK and in over 60 universities their members are currently using the Jobmi platform (www.jobmi.com) to identify and understand their strengths, as a result of the partnership between Bright Futures and Capp. Jobmi is Capp’s free to use employability platform that acts as a career companion by offering free assessments which identify strengths and give feedback on how best to deploy those strengths both when searching for positions and in role. By really harnessing their strengths and skills, young people can really improve their employability factor and find the right role in the right organisation. This is what it is really all about in the end; getting the job that fits you and finding an organisation that reflects your own values. The Bright Futures event gave people lots of help and guidance on how they can and should do this.

 

 

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Advice to parents of school leavers – top 4 tips

Posted by: Emma Trenier, Senior Psychologist, Capp.

 

 

 

Every Saturday I love to read The Inventory in the FT Weekend. In twenty questions (the same each week), experts in their field are asked about their lives and careers, including whether they had a mentor, whether ambition or talent matters more and whether they consider their carbon footprint. The question I love the most though is:

 

If your 20 year old self could see you now, what would they think?

 

Apart from writer P.J O’Rourke who said he wouldn’t even notice himself, almost every other interviewee has said that their younger self would be pleased to see that they had taken risks, followed their dreams and fought to succeed against the odds.

 

So, parents, whilst we rush around helping our young people to master the basics of workplace etiquette and summer job politics, we must not lose sight of our broader role – to help them take risks and dream big dreams.

 

To start with,

  1. Coach them, don’t instruct them. Build their confidence and motivation by helping them work out what they want to do and why. Help them imagine the benefits they will get if they go for it.
  2. Open their horizons. Help set up experiences, e.g., watching movies, visiting friend’s workplaces or reaching out to potential mentors, that will inspire them to believe they can achieve great things.  
  3. Focus on their strengths. Help them courageously follow a route that plays to their strengths- their areas of greatest potential (They can take a free Strengths Test on Jobmi which will give them some great insight).
  4. Build their resilience. I love the ‘Worth it Guide’ booklet (free to download) designed by young people to help others find their flow, focus on the positive and build their confidence.

 

And, finally, why not ask them,

 

If your 20 year old self could see you now, what would they say you should do?

 

If you’re helping your child, or advising friends who have children this A Level Results Day, two essential places to check are: The Telegraph Clearing Hub http://clearing.telegraph.co.uk/, and UCAS, who offer telephone support for school leavers and parents on 0371 468 0468, and for latest news and updates see their website http://www.ucas.com/ 

 

For more information on Jobmi and strengths development please call Capp on +44(0)2476 323 363 or connect with me, Emma Trenier, on LinkedIn

 

 

 

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Resilience – the positive attitude you need in overcoming obstacles

Posted by: Nick Hayter, Senior Psychologist, Capp.

 

 

A Level results day… a nervous wait then if you are a school leaver in the build up to a dizzying mix of emotions related to your UCAS points: meeting offers; missing offers; considering differed placements; considering adjustments to courses; or, reconsidering further education entirely.

 

Your A Level results are a milestone, greeted with either gratification and celebration or, a day that knocks your confidence and tests your resolve to quickly respond. If you miss the grades required to secure your first choice subject or degree, it’s important to remember that setbacks happen to everyone. Resilience helps you to stay calm, recover quickly and proactively seek alternatives. Since, this is unlikely to be your first (or last) situation when you’re expected to cope with adversity, it’s helpful to know that lots of characteristics define resilience.

 

Resilient people tend to have a blend of self-belief, energy and positive outlook. But, you are just as likely to draw on things unique to you in order to cope with tough times – for example, your sense of humour or setting clear goals.

 

Resilience is not fixed – this means that your levels of resilience can fall if you’re feeling drained, stressed or not looking after yourself. Equally, there are lots of ways that you can increase or top-up your levels of resilience. One tip, is to learn from resilient role models. You don’t need to know anyone famous, your resilient role models can be your friends or family members. Learn what helps them to recover from setbacks – that way, you might be able to cope better in a difficult situation, by asking yourself, “What would they do?”

 

If you would like to learn more about your strengths, www.Jobmi.com offers FREE assessments to help you find out and learn more about yourself, empowering you to find the right career.

 

If you need support and you’re looking for courses through Clearing, The Telegraph Clearing Hub has been set up to support you http://clearing.telegraph.co.uk/, and UCAS offer telephone support for school leavers and parents on 0371 468 0468, or see their website http://www.ucas.com/ 

 

For further information about Strengths and the work Capp do to help organisations with their school leaver, apprenticeship and diversity needs, please contact Capp on +44 (0)2476 323 363, or connect with me, Nick Hayter via LinkedIn - and good luck if you are waiting for your results.

 

 

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Winning through your strengths

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Strengths Consultant, Capp.

 

With the Commonwealth Games in full swing, I thought it would be great to share with you ways in which we can all be part of a winning team by using our strengths. Referring to the strengths and Strengths Families from Capp’s online strengths identification tool, Realise2, what do you bring to situations that make a winning combination?

 

Competitive: Let us start with the most obvious. You love winning and this will usually be the only acceptable option for you as it probably hurts to lose! You are used to leading and being part of a winning team.  Competitive was one of the top weaknesses in the UK in our Realise2 study so consider how can you support others and role model your talent to encourage others’ competitiveness.

 

Motivation:  What are your motivation strengths and how will these deliver your competitive goals? If you have Work Ethic or Persistence, you can put the time, energy and effort into keeping going to make sure you achieve success. If you have Drive you will push yourself to win as you love achieving the demanding goals you have set yourself. Those with a sense of Adventure will compete successfully by pushing the boundaries and achieving the impossible.

 

Thinking: If you are naturally gifted in your brainpower, what thinking strengths can help you win? You may want to come up with the newest or most creative idea in your organisation. Perhaps your Judgement helps you make winning decisions or your organisational strengths of Planful or Order make sure you get to the top of your game with the right resources and in a timely manner.

 

Relationships:  If people are your focus you might not have thought too much about winning but your skill at getting the best from people will help deliver winning targets and goals through others. If you are emotionally connected with others use this talent to pick up on clues of others strengths and weaknesses to channel their energy in the right direction. If you are the natural Connector, use your network to put the winning team or resources together.

 

Being: Some of the Being strengths are all about ‘Making a Difference’ for example, Mission, Legacy, Service and Moral Compass. By aligning your passions and values together with your goals, it won’t be long before your commitment to the task sees you outperforming others and driving teams forward positively.

 

Communication:  The key to getting others on board to deliver performance. With Narrator as a strength, your talent for storytelling and anecdotes is a powerful and convincing message to others as to why they should outperform. Perhaps you offer the Counterpoint, always looking for alternatives so you can achieve success another way if you come across challenges. The ability to use your Explainer and Scribe to avoid jargon and make sure the whole team understands their individual and team goals will be a powerful combination.

 

So, the next time you are working towards a winning goal, compete in a way that plays to your strengths and you are far more likely to maintain your engagement and get to the result you want.

 

Realise2 is the leading online strengths identification and development tool, used by 80,000+ to unlock the potential of individuals and teams.

 

To find out more about how using strengths can help your organisation find and retain the right talent, call Capp on +44(0)2476 323 363.

 

 

Follow @Capp_co on TwitterLinkedIn & Facebook.

 

 

 

 

 

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AGR Conference 2014 – All Good Reasons – to Implement Strengths

Posted by: Ben Jackson, Chief Solutions Officer, Capp.

 

 

Liverpool recently played new host to the ‘AGR Student Recruitment Conference 2014’, providing two days of insight and networking around understanding more about those at an early career stage.

 

It was a great pleasure to attend and to be involved in this year’s annual conference, which was expertly hosted and organised by the AGR team.

 

Day one saw us enjoy welcoming delegates to two completely packed Masterclass Sessions entitled ‘Turning Early Years Attraction and Recruitment on its Head’, which allowed us to showcase some of the remarkable achievements strengths assessment has allowed for two of our clients, Nestlé and Morrisons.

 

Supported by Nestle’s Entry Level Recruitment Manager – Tom Banham and Hannah Porter, Graduate Resourcing Business Partner for Morrisons, our own Chief Customer Officer, Nicky Garcea narrated our partners’ respective journey’s to date, as they individually evidenced the benefits that implementing a strengths focussed approach has had on their respective businesses.

 

Both the sessions allowed for audience participation over and above just typical Q&A and a 60 second interaction with the person you were sat next to was all it took to begin to understand what strengths-based interviewing is all about – with the further recognition of how easily this can be achieved on video!

 

An informative and educational handout not only contained a free access code to take the Realise2 Strengths Identification Test (www.realise2.com) but also a simple guide that explains how individual strengths are accounted and recognised.

 

In addition to sharing these useful tools, we took the opportunity to showcase Jobmi, the premier platform for job-seeker discovery and guidance – supporting people in understanding what type of career is best suited to their strengths (www.jobmi.com).

 

Excitingly for us, the questions from the floor in both classes and those asked by people who came up to us afterwards, really did highlight the fact that more and more people are ‘getting it’. Strengths-based assessment has got some serious momentum and the appetite amongst those in attendance was plain to see.

 

In summary it was a great couple of days and a great opportunity for us show how strengths-based assessment has demonstrated time and time again to deliver cost savings across the recruitment process, a higher quality of candidate at each stage of the process and a better fit and more productive employee into the workplace.

 

As The Strengths Specialists, we’d be delighted to talk to you more about how strengths assessment and development can make a huge impact in your business.

 

If you would like further information on the results shared by Tom and Hannah, please get in touch to request a copy of their case studies and also a copy of the Masterclass slide deck.

 

Please contact Capp on +44(0)2476 323 363 or connect with me, Ben Jackson, Chief Solutions Officer at Capp uk.linkedin.com/in/bensjackson

 

 

For read some recent AGR Magazine articles about our client’s Morrisons and Nestlé please see the below:

 

Morrisons

AGR Graduate Recruiter magazine Oct-Nov 2013: Jumping the Queue Carla Murray, Graduate Resourcing Manager, talks about how in two years Morrisons jumped from no graduate presence to making it to The Times Top 100 Graduate Employers List… See pages 6-7.

 

Nestlé

AGR Graduate Recruiter magazine Dec-Jan 2014: A Battle of Wills Tom Banham, Nestlé Academy Recruitment Manager, shares his five reasons how Nestlé has benefitted from a strengths-based process… See pages 26-28

 

 

 

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Leaving a Strengths Legacy in Your Career

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Strengths Consultant, Capp

 

I was asked recently to support a client on helping them work with the older generation in re-engaging them with their role as they approach their last 10 years at work. I thought I would share my reflections so you can see how Realise2 can support your workforce in leaving a strengths legacy through their career.

 

  • Connect individuals with their strengths of Legacy and Mission. Establish what this means for them in their role currently. How much do they use these strengths? What would it take to increase their use? How can their strengths make them feel as though they are making a difference? Whether it’s Innovation or in contrast Adherence, how can using these strengths support the person themselves, as well as helping others to achieve their goals?
  • How can you support/excite people with a longer term vision, based on their Realise2 profile rather than day job? What do they dream of achieving in the team? Where do they get the best positive feedback?
  • Are they focussing on their outcomes and delivering these with their strengths? Or are they simply doing what they always do that works? How can they get there another way whilst enabling and supporting the future talent of the organisation?
  • What do their unrealised strengths say? Here is potential to unlock further passion and energy. They might not be aware of this. Discovering it could leverage further motivation as it could be something new to get involved in.
  • How can they use their strengths to role model the future of the organisation? Who can they mentor and what strengths would make a lasting impact to others if they dialled those strengths up?
  • Often senior/experienced people have a lot of learned behaviours. Are they doing everything well, rather than maximising the top half of the quadrant? Having learnt to be capable in all areas may have got them to where they are now, but do they need to keep on proving themselves in their low energy areas?
  • Invite people to cross out those learned behaviours they simply don’t want to use anymore. This can be a helpful trick to get them to find more energising ways of doing things.
  • Re-write their leadership statement, this time based on their strengths. Consider ‘What do I really want people to come to me for and what do I not want them to come to me for? We can get known for our learned behaviours, so it’s important we don’t get stuck in this area.
  • What do they want to be read out at their retirement party?  What strengths lend themselves more towards these goals? Which learned behaviours need to be moderated to enable more focus?
  • If they are involved in succession planning, what are the strengths and weaknesses of the team? Where are the gaps and how could their strengths support them right now to develop and grow?
  • Do their strengths families show a preference for any particular behaviour? How can their role take on more of this whilst delegating the draining attributes to others?

 

As people start to look back over their careers and think about the next generation, a powerful way of doing that is to consider the strengths legacy that they can leave for those who follow. Help inspire your workforce to develop their own strengths legacy today!

 

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Celebrating the Whole You

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Capp

 

I have spent many years working with Realise2, Capp’s strengths identification tool which includes weaknesses. It still frustrates me a little how slow the journey can be, for some people to accept their weaknesses, mitigate them and move on. In this blog, I share some reflections that might help your weaknesses sit more comfortably with you.

 

What’s the real story?

 

In my experience, if you resonate with your Realise2 weakness, it is very likely something that has been with you for some time and possibly tripped you up at some point. With our 4M Model we recommend you Minimise it, which means: don’t use it; ask others to support you; and focus on the outcome, delivering this with your strengths.

 

My Adherence weakness is here to stay (along with most of the UK!) and I work around it. I know who to call on, when to own it and how I can use my strengths of Pride and Order to support me in overcoming it.

 

Too hard on yourself?

 

Perhaps others around you do this better than you, so you have been particularly hard on yourself. Personally, Scribe is one for me that pops up in this category. I’m surrounded by people with PhDs and so occasionally feel that my talent in this area needs more of a polish. 

 

Revisit your weakness and gather your evidence of when you have done this well before. And choose your comparisons carefully!

 

Frustrated?

 

Sometimes I coach people where they feel one of their strengths has appeared as a weakness (in Realise2). This usually is a sign something simply isn’t working for them in this area. Perhaps it is the way they are using it, or they are not using it at all.

 

Help others to see when they have been successful in this before. What constraints exist around the weakness currently ? See if you  can find ways to release more energy into these tasks.

 

Be Realistic

 

If you were to rate the impact of your weakness that you felt you needed to work on, how critical would it be? Asking clients to do this can immediately eliminate that need to ‘fix’ it by being realistic in terms of how it is really impacting their role. The need to be perfect sometimes raises its head in places it doesn’t need to.

 

And, even better, revealing weaknesses can be extremely positive:

 

  • Weaknesses help us build trust with others. According to Goffee & Jones in Why Should Anyone Be Led By You? if we reveal our weaknesses we become more human and attractive to others.
  • It also helps highlight your team’s strengths. Often, when you delegate your weakness to others, you open up opportunities for them to take on responsibility for tasks that allow their strengths to shine through.

 

So, what are you waiting for? Delegate and be proud to have a couple of things you don’t do so well! After all, none of us is perfect…

 

Contact trudy.bailey@capp.co to understand how Realise2 can support you, your teams, managers and leaders.

 

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Using your strengths, is a truer insight to a young person’s readiness to enter work

Posted by: Helen Dovey, Senior Psychologist, Capp

 

“Small jobs make a big difference to young people.” This was the keynote message delivered by Michael Davies, the Chief Executive of the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES) last week. Mr Davies opened the launch of ‘Precarious Futures: Youth Employment in an International Context’ report, hosted in the Science Museum.

 

I attended with the great and good from industry, parliament and academia to hear the UKCES’s recommendations for addressing youth unemployment today.

 

The resounding conclusion was clear: any kind of work experience significantly improves the career trajectory of young people today.

 

And why is this? We heard business leaders across the world describe how their early employment experiences shaped their learning agility, skills and knowledge, fundamentally preparing them for the world of work. This ranged from:

 

  • Working in a newsagent (Fiona Kendrick, Chief Executive and Chairman of Nestlé UK and Ireland) honing interpersonal skills and the true meaning of supply and demand
  • Working in McDonalds (Jill Huntley, Managing Director of Corporate Citizenship, Accenture) developing an appreciation for work ethic and the advancement one earns as a result
  • Delivering a paper round (Michael Davies, the Chief Executive of the UKCES) building trust with others and the value of team work

 

Interestingly, the UKCES report reveals that from over 90,000 organisations surveyed, nearly 25% of those who recruit school leavers cite lack of work experience or maturity as a key constraint in this population. This was closely followed by poor attitude or lack of motivation at 18%. By contrast, the technical side looks bright with only 4% citing poor numeracy and literacy skills as a barrier.

 

From my perspective, these findings imply a largely eager, technically able population of young people, hungry to enter the employment market but with no evidence to showcase their potential.

 

I left the event feeling that businesses are certainly striving to enable young people to enter their organisation at flexible levels. From the Nestlé Academy, to Google’s 3000 strong Internship programme, the initiatives are there.

 

My challenge is this: how do we assess young people, who do not have the employment history from which to build their personal business case?

 

Working with school leaver and graduate recruiters across sectors, such as professional services, FMCG and IT, I hear the same thing. ”We want talented, ambitious, hard working and agile individuals”.

 

While past experience has traditionally been a predictor of job success, at Capp we know from a decade of research that the study of one’s individual’s strengths, not what you have done, is a truer insight to a young person’s readiness to enter work.

 

This sits at the core of our recruitment methodology and for me, provides the how in addition to the what we can all do to address youth employment today.

 

Nestlé Academy Fast Start Programme Case Study

 

A great example of success in recruiting young people is the industry-leading Nestlé Academy Fast Start Programme, a three year scheme for school leavers. Capp worked in partnership with Nestlé to define the indicators of success and to design an assessment strategy capable of identifying individuals’ potential for success, without relying on candidates’ limited previous work experience. The three main challenges were:

  • To increase social mobility in the recruitment process – a programme that would enable anyone, regardless of their background the opportunity to ‘learn while you earn’.
  • To differentiate Fast Start from other school leaver programmes.
  • To identify candidates with high potential, not based on limited previous work experience.

 

The success of this scheme won Capp & Nestlé the Best Apprentice/School Leaver Recruitment Strategy Category at the Recruiter Awards 2014. To read about the business outcomes, please see more in our case study here.

 

For further information on strengths-based assessment, apprenticeships and young careers please contact Claire Marr, Client Services Manager at capp@capp.co or telephone +44 (0)2476 323 363 or Link In with me, Helen Dovey at uk.linkedin.com/in/helendovey

 

Follow @Capp_co on Twitter, LinkedIn & Facebook.

 

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Celebrating 5 years of Realise2

Posted by: Alex Linley, CEO, Capp

 

It’s now 5 years since we launched Realise2, our strengths identification and development tool.

 

Realise2 was one of the key solutions we developed in service of our Capp purpose of Strengthening the World. We had then, and still have now, the desire for everyone in the world to know what their strengths are and to be able to use them every day.

 

We’re making progress, but there’s still a way to go. At the time of writing, through Realise2 and our other tools based on Realise2, more than 250,000 people around the world have been given a language and a framework to understand and use their strengths.

 

And this matters.

 

As the research has consistently shown, when we use our strengths, we are:

More likely to achieve our goals

More likely to be engaged at work

More likely to be happy

More likely to be confident

More likely to be resilient

Less likely to get stressed

 

Through our work, and your support, there are now at least a quarter of million more people who are experiencing these powerful lessons for themselves.

 

Here’s to reaching 1,000,000 more people – at least – in the next five years!

 

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Telegraph UK STEM Awards 2014

Posted by: Nick Hayter,  Senior Psychologist, Capp

Source: Telegraph. Winner Holly Bishop (centre) with her trophy and judges Richard Gray and Rachel Riley

 

On Monday 9 June, I had the fortunate opportunity to attend the inaugural UK STEM Awards at the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). The Telegraph, in partnership with Babcock International Group hosted an excellent ceremony which celebrated the talent of our young and aspiring scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians (STEM). Launched in March, the initiative invited students to submit their ideas for tackling real-life challenges, on the condition that entries were feasible, original and beneficial to society.

 

Video presentations summarised the winning ideas in five categories, each sponsored by a prestigious employer in the industry: Pharmaceuticals, GlaxoSmithKline; Automotive, McLaren Group; Environment, Semta; Construction, Atkins; Defence, BAE Systems. The overall winner was Holly Bishop, studying at Plymouth University, for her concept of a medication reminder bracelet with a light and vibration reminder that is only deactivated by scanning the medication box, thus ensuring the medication is taken. Holly’s prize was a cheque for £25,000, as well as a bespoke mentoring programme from a senior engineer at Babcock (an amazing opportunity for self-development and career planning).

 

We were also treated to speakers from government, academia and the sponsor businesses; all were unequivocal in their passion for STEM-related studies, reminding us how crucial these subjects are in the design and production of literally everything we interact with on a daily basis.

 

In summary, the awards ceremony opened up my eyes to three main things:

 

First, it showed me how important it is to position and celebrate the sciences in schools and colleges. (Maths homework will seem a lot more worthwhile, if you know the benefits it can bring to you and society.)

Second, it confirmed that technology and engineering companies need to continue their efforts in creating roles that inspire current and future STEM-students – otherwise mass migration towards other professions will continue.

Third, I couldn’t help but think how Jobmi can benefit the students and employers that I saw at the awards, by helping to identify young people with a passion for sciences and match them to the right employers. It encourages me to know that the eventual outcome of this, enables our future scientists and engineers to improve the way we all go about our daily lives.

 

The UK STEM Awards for 2015 is already in planning – I am really looking forward to seeing the new challenges that students will take on, and hope I can attend the awards next year too! To read about the awards, see here. 

 

For further information on how Capp can help your organisation find the right talent, please call Nick Hayter on Tel +44 (0) 2476 323 363 , email nick.hayter@capp.co or Link in with me here.

 

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