Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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November 2017
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School Leavers’ Fortnight

Advice to parents of school leavers – top 4 tips

Posted by: Emma Trenier, Senior Psychologist, Capp.

 

 

 

Every Saturday I love to read The Inventory in the FT Weekend. In twenty questions (the same each week), experts in their field are asked about their lives and careers, including whether they had a mentor, whether ambition or talent matters more and whether they consider their carbon footprint. The question I love the most though is:

 

If your 20 year old self could see you now, what would they think?

 

Apart from writer P.J O’Rourke who said he wouldn’t even notice himself, almost every other interviewee has said that their younger self would be pleased to see that they had taken risks, followed their dreams and fought to succeed against the odds.

 

So, parents, whilst we rush around helping our young people to master the basics of workplace etiquette and summer job politics, we must not lose sight of our broader role – to help them take risks and dream big dreams.

 

To start with,

  1. Coach them, don’t instruct them. Build their confidence and motivation by helping them work out what they want to do and why. Help them imagine the benefits they will get if they go for it.
  2. Open their horizons. Help set up experiences, e.g., watching movies, visiting friend’s workplaces or reaching out to potential mentors, that will inspire them to believe they can achieve great things.  
  3. Focus on their strengths. Help them courageously follow a route that plays to their strengths- their areas of greatest potential (They can take a free Strengths Test on Jobmi which will give them some great insight).
  4. Build their resilience. I love the ‘Worth it Guide’ booklet (free to download) designed by young people to help others find their flow, focus on the positive and build their confidence.

 

And, finally, why not ask them,

 

If your 20 year old self could see you now, what would they say you should do?

 

If you’re helping your child, or advising friends who have children this A Level Results Day, two essential places to check are: The Telegraph Clearing Hub http://clearing.telegraph.co.uk/, and UCAS, who offer telephone support for school leavers and parents on 0371 468 0468, and for latest news and updates see their website http://www.ucas.com/ 

 

For more information on Jobmi and strengths development please call Capp on +44(0)2476 323 363 or connect with me, Emma Trenier, on LinkedIn

 

 

 

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Resilience – the positive attitude you need in overcoming obstacles

Posted by: Nick Hayter, Senior Psychologist, Capp.

 

 

A Level results day… a nervous wait then if you are a school leaver in the build up to a dizzying mix of emotions related to your UCAS points: meeting offers; missing offers; considering differed placements; considering adjustments to courses; or, reconsidering further education entirely.

 

Your A Level results are a milestone, greeted with either gratification and celebration or, a day that knocks your confidence and tests your resolve to quickly respond. If you miss the grades required to secure your first choice subject or degree, it’s important to remember that setbacks happen to everyone. Resilience helps you to stay calm, recover quickly and proactively seek alternatives. Since, this is unlikely to be your first (or last) situation when you’re expected to cope with adversity, it’s helpful to know that lots of characteristics define resilience.

 

Resilient people tend to have a blend of self-belief, energy and positive outlook. But, you are just as likely to draw on things unique to you in order to cope with tough times – for example, your sense of humour or setting clear goals.

 

Resilience is not fixed – this means that your levels of resilience can fall if you’re feeling drained, stressed or not looking after yourself. Equally, there are lots of ways that you can increase or top-up your levels of resilience. One tip, is to learn from resilient role models. You don’t need to know anyone famous, your resilient role models can be your friends or family members. Learn what helps them to recover from setbacks – that way, you might be able to cope better in a difficult situation, by asking yourself, “What would they do?”

 

If you would like to learn more about your strengths, www.Jobmi.com offers FREE assessments to help you find out and learn more about yourself, empowering you to find the right career.

 

If you need support and you’re looking for courses through Clearing, The Telegraph Clearing Hub has been set up to support you http://clearing.telegraph.co.uk/, and UCAS offer telephone support for school leavers and parents on 0371 468 0468, or see their website http://www.ucas.com/ 

 

For further information about Strengths and the work Capp do to help organisations with their school leaver, apprenticeship and diversity needs, please contact Capp on +44 (0)2476 323 363, or connect with me, Nick Hayter via LinkedIn - and good luck if you are waiting for your results.

 

 

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Telegraph UK STEM Awards 2014

Posted by: Nick Hayter,  Senior Psychologist, Capp

Source: Telegraph. Winner Holly Bishop (centre) with her trophy and judges Richard Gray and Rachel Riley

 

On Monday 9 June, I had the fortunate opportunity to attend the inaugural UK STEM Awards at the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). The Telegraph, in partnership with Babcock International Group hosted an excellent ceremony which celebrated the talent of our young and aspiring scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians (STEM). Launched in March, the initiative invited students to submit their ideas for tackling real-life challenges, on the condition that entries were feasible, original and beneficial to society.

 

Video presentations summarised the winning ideas in five categories, each sponsored by a prestigious employer in the industry: Pharmaceuticals, GlaxoSmithKline; Automotive, McLaren Group; Environment, Semta; Construction, Atkins; Defence, BAE Systems. The overall winner was Holly Bishop, studying at Plymouth University, for her concept of a medication reminder bracelet with a light and vibration reminder that is only deactivated by scanning the medication box, thus ensuring the medication is taken. Holly’s prize was a cheque for £25,000, as well as a bespoke mentoring programme from a senior engineer at Babcock (an amazing opportunity for self-development and career planning).

 

We were also treated to speakers from government, academia and the sponsor businesses; all were unequivocal in their passion for STEM-related studies, reminding us how crucial these subjects are in the design and production of literally everything we interact with on a daily basis.

 

In summary, the awards ceremony opened up my eyes to three main things:

 

First, it showed me how important it is to position and celebrate the sciences in schools and colleges. (Maths homework will seem a lot more worthwhile, if you know the benefits it can bring to you and society.)

Second, it confirmed that technology and engineering companies need to continue their efforts in creating roles that inspire current and future STEM-students – otherwise mass migration towards other professions will continue.

Third, I couldn’t help but think how Jobmi can benefit the students and employers that I saw at the awards, by helping to identify young people with a passion for sciences and match them to the right employers. It encourages me to know that the eventual outcome of this, enables our future scientists and engineers to improve the way we all go about our daily lives.

 

The UK STEM Awards for 2015 is already in planning – I am really looking forward to seeing the new challenges that students will take on, and hope I can attend the awards next year too! To read about the awards, see here. 

 

For further information on how Capp can help your organisation find the right talent, please call Nick Hayter on Tel +44 (0) 2476 323 363 , email nick.hayter@capp.co or Link in with me here.

 

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What Graduates Want – What is their 5 per Day?

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Chief Commercial Officer, Capp.

 

Graduates are different, graduates are hungry, graduates know what they want. These are the many opinions floating around graduate recruitment and development.

 

In the AGR Student Development Conference (13 March 2014), research was presented to test out what exactly is the real data on what graduates want and need to engage their hearts, not just their brilliant minds. Also what is the smallest thing we can all do today to increase graduate engagement at work tomorrow?

 

Research shows 90% of grads feel they deserve their dream job, 80% want regular feedback from their managers, 70% want more ‘me time’ at work. There appears to be a lot of ‘me’ in the data, give me time, give me space, recognise and value me. So how does this compare with other generations of workers and indeed other Gen Y’s? The data shows less concern for customers, job security and reward than older generations, yet like Gen Y’s there are five big conditions to engage and retain them.

 

  • Recognition: more than other employees grads need very open regular feedback, being valued and very regularly is critical to them – or they will seek it elsewhere.
  • Reputation: they will work and engage with employers of high repute, more than other generations who needed / wanted job security, we have to prove our value to them.
  • Empowerment: this is about trusting grads to get on with important things – they will go the extra mile or ten for employers who give them large scope and long reach.
  • Communications: more than other employees they need more communications, they have a deep hunger to know what’s going on – so we need to feed this in specific ways.
  • Careers: it not the job they want it’s the ladder, and they want to see how older grads have really made good– like leaders who once were grads – learning from/working with them.

 

The opportunity is there for the taking, and as if to remind us what happens if we do not provide – there is a major drop, like a stone in grad engagement within a year or so of joining. Graduate engagement drops from typical highs of 70% or even 80% to lows of 50%-60% at best with all their other expectations performance and loyalty.

 

So what can be done? These opportunities are already nailed by many top grad recruiters. Whether by design, data or desirability, there are many great examples.

 

First, engage them early, pre-hire not post hire. Second, message your schemes high on regular recognition – show case studies of grads receiving internal awards from senior leaders, working with leaders, position the recognition your company is getting too, external awards for initiatives, innovation, growth, focussing on Talent for example. Third, give early responsibility, working on key senior high value projects imperative to the business yet match their strengths. Communicate within a social grad network so they learn and grow from others’ successes, so building a future social leaders network. Finally showcase extreme performance, positioning success and reputation of ex grad scheme employees.

 

These and the already many innovations in place we could all share are not just ‘good ideas’, they are practices that feed the few deep essentials that engage grad hearts and minds.

 

I you would like to discuss graduate recruitment and development further, please contact me directly on: Capp +44 (0) 2476 232 363 or Link In with me, send me an in-mail, and I’ll contact you: uk.linkedin.com/in/vernonbryce

 

Nicky Garcea, Chief Customer Officer, Capp and Vernon Bryce, Chief Commercial Officer, Capp presented ‘Engaging the Hearts and Minds of Graduates’ at the AGR Student Development Conference, 13 March 4014.

www.agr.org.uk

 

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Capp launch the Jobmi Manifesto

 

We are proud to launch the Jobmi Manifesto today, on the opening day of National Apprenticeship Week and National Careers Week.
 

Jobmi is the employability and recruitment platform from Capp. It connects young people and employers. Young people are matched to the company’s success criteria using a range of Jobmi assessments that are free to access. Employers find candidates who are pre-screened and pre-qualified, and a fit for their culture, role and future.
 

Through the Jobmi Manifesto, we are building a stakeholder coalition to improve job prospects and recruitment practices for young people.
 

In the Jobmi Manifesto, you will see how we are working to:
 

Excite employers
Energise schools, colleges and universities
Engage young people
Enable strengths
Empower social mobility

 

Show your support for the Jobmi Manifesto here.

If you really want to help, please forward this to your colleagues and friends who want to support young people and early careers.
 

Together we will make a difference to the employability and recruitment prospects of young people.
 

Thank you
 

Capp
 

www.capp.co/

www.jobmi.com

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The Challenge of Youth Unemployment

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

John Longworth, Director General of the British Chambers of Commerce, has called on George Osborne to ensure that the 2014 budget focuses on youth unemployment. With the unemployment rate at 19.9% for 16-24 year olds, there is a lot that needs to be done.

 

That’s one in five of our young people who are out of work, missing the chance to realise their potential and develop their careers. In a developed economy such as ours in the UK, that is simply not good enough.

 

At Capp, we have taken our experience and expertise in early careers recruitment, our wide university and student connections, and our deep knowledge and capability in assessment and development. We have combined them to build Jobmi.

 

Jobmi is the employability and recruitment platform, aimed at 16-24 year olds, and providing them with routes to develop their employability and find jobs.

 

With National Apprenticeship Week next week, we will be taking the opportunity to launch the Jobmi Manifesto, setting out just what we and our partners are working together to achieve through Jobmi.

 

There’s a better way to deliver better outcomes for everybody involved in early careers recruitment. With Jobmi we’re going to show how this can be done.

 

Join Jobmi at www.jobmi.com.

 

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Introducing Jobmi – The Great New Employability and Recruitment Platform from Capp

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

Jobmi – www.jobmi.com – is the great new employability and recruitment platform from Capp.

 

Aimed at emerging talent and early careers, Jobmi helps young people to learn more about their skills and strengths, take assessments to build their employability, and complete employer assessments just once for consideration by lots of different employers.

 

At Capp, we’ve heard many of our graduate and early careers recruitment clients talk about how frustrated they are by the arbitrary screening criteria they have to introduce to manage candidate volumes.

 

These are things like UCAS points and applications only from specific universities, which allow recruiters to manage the applicant pool but create false barriers to social mobility.

 

Jobmi is our revolutionary solution to this problem. Jobmi removes the need for arbitrary screening criteria because Jobmi provides employers and recruiters with the data you need to make informed decisions.

 

With candidates completing employer assessments in advance at no cost to them, as an employer you have more data on a candidate - and the right data – than you have ever had available before.

 

Early client partners working with Jobmi include Barclays, Morrisons, Nestlé and NFU Mutual, with many more to be announced in the coming weeks.

 

Watch this space for further updates about developments on Jobmi, of which there will be many!

 

To become a Jobmi member yourself and claim your personalised Jobmi url before anybody else does, join us at www.jobmi.com

 

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Use Your Exam Results as a Springboard for Success

Posted by: Amy Willocks & Reena Jamnadas, Consulting Psychologists, Capp

 

It is that time of year again: exam results time. After intense periods of studying, hard work, and persistence towards opening the door to your dreams and aspirations, now comes the time for what feels like Judgement Day.

 

You open that all-important envelope which contains either the key to unlock the door that you wanted – or – a different key, to a different door!

 

So whether you are rejoicing because you got the grades you need, or thinking about your next move, hold the thought that it’s what you do from here on that will reveal opportunity and unmask possibility.

 

We give you three tips below about how to build resilience and maximise this as a springboard for further success.

 

1. Develop a growth mindset

 

Do not catastrophise the situation by thinking that all your hopes are shattered forever. They are not! What are the things that you do have within your control that you can influence to find a different route to achieving your goals?

 

What specific positive skills, attitudes, and behaviours can you leverage? If you’re not sure, ask people that you trust for feedback.

 

What’s more is that many graduate employers are now increasing their focus on social mobility, embracing a broadened range of knowledge, skills and qualifications when recruiting. Qualifications are no longer the ‘be all and end all’ – watch this space for our case study on the recent success of the Nestlé Fast Start Programme.

 

2. Re-align with your goals, purpose and network

 

What meaningful goals have you set for yourself in your career? Maintain a focus on your purpose and goals in life, re-gain your sense of control and power, and carve out a different path forward. Identify who in your network you can draw on for support in the form of a trusted mentor.

 

It is very easy to just succumb or procrastinate when things do not go as planned, but taking an active approach and bouncing back from a setback will reveal possibilities that you may not ever have imagined.

 

3. Identify your strengths

 

Capp’s experience of how successful students rise above the rest is by knowing their strengths. Reflect on when you have been most energised – what specific things were you learning about or doing that would give you an insight into future areas of knowledge and expertise that would play to your strengths?

 

Increasingly, organisations such as Aviva, Barclays, EY, Morrisons, and Nestlé  are assessing graduates using strengths-based recruitment methods. It is crucial that you know your strengths and that you understand them – see www.realise2.com to discover your strengths!

 

So, if you are holding the key to a different door at any point in your life or career, we congratulate you! For now is the time that extraordinary possibilities can be unmasked before you…

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The Opportunity of School Leaver Talent

Posted by: Celine Floyd, Managing Psychologist, Capp

 

Following on from our last blog by Helen and Nicky on the AGR theme of harnessing school leaver talent, we reflect on the real opportunities that this talent pool presents to our clients, and why.

 

Graduates bring some fundamental, unique, and significant skills and knowledge. This is well known and celebrated, across the world. And rightly so.

 

However, the social and economical face of our next working generation is changing and the traditional university route isn’t feasible or indeed appealing to some anymore. More and more of our clients are turning to School Leaver and Apprentice Programmes and seeing exceptional performance. We speculate as to why.

 

Is it because their ‘minds’ and ‘horizons’ are still relatively broad? Having not focused in on one particular subject for three or more years, their modes of thinking and analysing, and their perspectives, are still mouldable. From the perspective of organisational culture, this is interesting too.

 

Whilst a lack of work experience on paper may seem a disadvantage, could it in fact be a benefit for your organisation? School leavers’ ways of working with others, delivering outcomes, and presenting themselves will all be built around your needs and established ways of working. If we can assess properly for that raw potential, then those vital employability skills can be developed in a quicker and more aligned way.

 

If we look at sponsored degree programmes, may we anticipate a higher level of engagement, motivation and performance because of a stronger psychological contract? We know that helping people to grow and learn is worth more to most than pure monetary reward, so do these programmes play to that in a really powerful way? The potential to build organisational commitment and loyalty with School Leavers in this way is significant.

 

Finally, one can assume that working whilst studying has benefits in itself. Having the opportunity to put into practice academic thinking in real time with fantastic immediacy renders experimentation and quick learning agility. We know that the bite size format of our development programmes works well, so this would follow through to students who study while working.

 

We are not discounting in any way the value that graduates add, but we also encourage a more holistic view of the early career talent out there.

 

What are your thoughts? We would love to hear your experiences. What differences have you seen between your graduates and school leavers? Why do you think this is?

 

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50 Shades of Entry Level Talent

Posted by: Helen Dovey, Consulting Psychologist & Nicky Garcea, Director, Capp

 

Two weeks on from the Association of Graduate Recruiters Annual Conference, we’re continuing to reflect on some of the hot topics that grabbed the delegates’ attention.

 

A discussion panel led by a diverse mix of graduate recruiters explored the shades of grey involved in attracting and recruiting for entry level talent.

 

How do recruiters tap into this talent pool? Whose responsibility is it to create opportunities at an entry level rather than at graduate level? What is best practice for assessing entry level recruits fairly?

 

These were some of the questions addressed during and after the session.

 

What’s our take on this?

 

First, we support advising recruiters to consider “what other programmes do we offer that aren’t graduate level?” Of course, there are budgetary and practical considerations associated with this. Recruiters need to clarify where best to place entry level recruits in the business and manage the cost of designing and implementing programmes that are of mutual benefit to the individual and the employer.

 

This may sound like a taxing prospect for employers. However, an interesting revelation is that entry level recruitment isn’t worlds away from graduate recruitment. In fact, the entry level candidates we are seeing with our own clients are just as hungry, intellectually capable and in some cases, more commercially minded than their existing graduates.

 

Our advice to employers would be not to underestimate this talent pool. Look at your business needs, but we bet you’ll be pleasantly surprised by the calibre of this emerging talent pipeline!

 

Second, we recognise the joint responsibility of recruiters and schools in generating opportunities for entry level recruits. Schools need to promote entry level opportunities as an equally decent alternative to university, while recruiters need to engage proactively in making links with schools and colleges.

 

Finally: the assessment piece. How do you fairly assess a group of people with very little work experience? Competency-based recruitment focuses on past behavioural experience for which school leavers will struggle to provide examples.

 

Instead we want to look at potential. Strengths-based assessment provides the answer. Assessing candidates on their learning agility, energy and motivation provides a dynamic insight into their potential to excel.

 

To learn more about Capp’s work in entry level talent, please look out for our upcoming case study with Nestlé and their innovative Fast Start Programme, bringing great school leaver and apprentice talent into their business.

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