Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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September 2019
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Realise2

Leaving a Strengths Legacy in Your Career

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Strengths Consultant, Capp

 

I was asked recently to support a client on helping them work with the older generation in re-engaging them with their role as they approach their last 10 years at work. I thought I would share my reflections so you can see how Realise2 can support your workforce in leaving a strengths legacy through their career.

 

  • Connect individuals with their strengths of Legacy and Mission. Establish what this means for them in their role currently. How much do they use these strengths? What would it take to increase their use? How can their strengths make them feel as though they are making a difference? Whether it’s Innovation or in contrast Adherence, how can using these strengths support the person themselves, as well as helping others to achieve their goals?
  • How can you support/excite people with a longer term vision, based on their Realise2 profile rather than day job? What do they dream of achieving in the team? Where do they get the best positive feedback?
  • Are they focussing on their outcomes and delivering these with their strengths? Or are they simply doing what they always do that works? How can they get there another way whilst enabling and supporting the future talent of the organisation?
  • What do their unrealised strengths say? Here is potential to unlock further passion and energy. They might not be aware of this. Discovering it could leverage further motivation as it could be something new to get involved in.
  • How can they use their strengths to role model the future of the organisation? Who can they mentor and what strengths would make a lasting impact to others if they dialled those strengths up?
  • Often senior/experienced people have a lot of learned behaviours. Are they doing everything well, rather than maximising the top half of the quadrant? Having learnt to be capable in all areas may have got them to where they are now, but do they need to keep on proving themselves in their low energy areas?
  • Invite people to cross out those learned behaviours they simply don’t want to use anymore. This can be a helpful trick to get them to find more energising ways of doing things.
  • Re-write their leadership statement, this time based on their strengths. Consider ‘What do I really want people to come to me for and what do I not want them to come to me for? We can get known for our learned behaviours, so it’s important we don’t get stuck in this area.
  • What do they want to be read out at their retirement party?  What strengths lend themselves more towards these goals? Which learned behaviours need to be moderated to enable more focus?
  • If they are involved in succession planning, what are the strengths and weaknesses of the team? Where are the gaps and how could their strengths support them right now to develop and grow?
  • Do their strengths families show a preference for any particular behaviour? How can their role take on more of this whilst delegating the draining attributes to others?

 

As people start to look back over their careers and think about the next generation, a powerful way of doing that is to consider the strengths legacy that they can leave for those who follow. Help inspire your workforce to develop their own strengths legacy today!

 

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Celebrating the Whole You

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Capp

 

I have spent many years working with Realise2, Capp’s strengths identification tool which includes weaknesses. It still frustrates me a little how slow the journey can be, for some people to accept their weaknesses, mitigate them and move on. In this blog, I share some reflections that might help your weaknesses sit more comfortably with you.

 

What’s the real story?

 

In my experience, if you resonate with your Realise2 weakness, it is very likely something that has been with you for some time and possibly tripped you up at some point. With our 4M Model we recommend you Minimise it, which means: don’t use it; ask others to support you; and focus on the outcome, delivering this with your strengths.

 

My Adherence weakness is here to stay (along with most of the UK!) and I work around it. I know who to call on, when to own it and how I can use my strengths of Pride and Order to support me in overcoming it.

 

Too hard on yourself?

 

Perhaps others around you do this better than you, so you have been particularly hard on yourself. Personally, Scribe is one for me that pops up in this category. I’m surrounded by people with PhDs and so occasionally feel that my talent in this area needs more of a polish. 

 

Revisit your weakness and gather your evidence of when you have done this well before. And choose your comparisons carefully!

 

Frustrated?

 

Sometimes I coach people where they feel one of their strengths has appeared as a weakness (in Realise2). This usually is a sign something simply isn’t working for them in this area. Perhaps it is the way they are using it, or they are not using it at all.

 

Help others to see when they have been successful in this before. What constraints exist around the weakness currently ? See if you  can find ways to release more energy into these tasks.

 

Be Realistic

 

If you were to rate the impact of your weakness that you felt you needed to work on, how critical would it be? Asking clients to do this can immediately eliminate that need to ‘fix’ it by being realistic in terms of how it is really impacting their role. The need to be perfect sometimes raises its head in places it doesn’t need to.

 

And, even better, revealing weaknesses can be extremely positive:

 

  • Weaknesses help us build trust with others. According to Goffee & Jones in Why Should Anyone Be Led By You? if we reveal our weaknesses we become more human and attractive to others.
  • It also helps highlight your team’s strengths. Often, when you delegate your weakness to others, you open up opportunities for them to take on responsibility for tasks that allow their strengths to shine through.

 

So, what are you waiting for? Delegate and be proud to have a couple of things you don’t do so well! After all, none of us is perfect…

 

Contact trudy.bailey@capp.co to understand how Realise2 can support you, your teams, managers and leaders.

 

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Celebrating 5 years of Realise2

Posted by: Alex Linley, CEO, Capp

 

It’s now 5 years since we launched Realise2, our strengths identification and development tool.

 

Realise2 was one of the key solutions we developed in service of our Capp purpose of Strengthening the World. We had then, and still have now, the desire for everyone in the world to know what their strengths are and to be able to use them every day.

 

We’re making progress, but there’s still a way to go. At the time of writing, through Realise2 and our other tools based on Realise2, more than 250,000 people around the world have been given a language and a framework to understand and use their strengths.

 

And this matters.

 

As the research has consistently shown, when we use our strengths, we are:

More likely to achieve our goals

More likely to be engaged at work

More likely to be happy

More likely to be confident

More likely to be resilient

Less likely to get stressed

 

Through our work, and your support, there are now at least a quarter of million more people who are experiencing these powerful lessons for themselves.

 

Here’s to reaching 1,000,000 more people – at least – in the next five years!

 

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What Graduates Want – What is their 5 per Day?

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Chief Commercial Officer, Capp.

 

Graduates are different, graduates are hungry, graduates know what they want. These are the many opinions floating around graduate recruitment and development.

 

In the AGR Student Development Conference (13 March 2014), research was presented to test out what exactly is the real data on what graduates want and need to engage their hearts, not just their brilliant minds. Also what is the smallest thing we can all do today to increase graduate engagement at work tomorrow?

 

Research shows 90% of grads feel they deserve their dream job, 80% want regular feedback from their managers, 70% want more ‘me time’ at work. There appears to be a lot of ‘me’ in the data, give me time, give me space, recognise and value me. So how does this compare with other generations of workers and indeed other Gen Y’s? The data shows less concern for customers, job security and reward than older generations, yet like Gen Y’s there are five big conditions to engage and retain them.

 

  • Recognition: more than other employees grads need very open regular feedback, being valued and very regularly is critical to them – or they will seek it elsewhere.
  • Reputation: they will work and engage with employers of high repute, more than other generations who needed / wanted job security, we have to prove our value to them.
  • Empowerment: this is about trusting grads to get on with important things – they will go the extra mile or ten for employers who give them large scope and long reach.
  • Communications: more than other employees they need more communications, they have a deep hunger to know what’s going on – so we need to feed this in specific ways.
  • Careers: it not the job they want it’s the ladder, and they want to see how older grads have really made good– like leaders who once were grads – learning from/working with them.

 

The opportunity is there for the taking, and as if to remind us what happens if we do not provide – there is a major drop, like a stone in grad engagement within a year or so of joining. Graduate engagement drops from typical highs of 70% or even 80% to lows of 50%-60% at best with all their other expectations performance and loyalty.

 

So what can be done? These opportunities are already nailed by many top grad recruiters. Whether by design, data or desirability, there are many great examples.

 

First, engage them early, pre-hire not post hire. Second, message your schemes high on regular recognition – show case studies of grads receiving internal awards from senior leaders, working with leaders, position the recognition your company is getting too, external awards for initiatives, innovation, growth, focussing on Talent for example. Third, give early responsibility, working on key senior high value projects imperative to the business yet match their strengths. Communicate within a social grad network so they learn and grow from others’ successes, so building a future social leaders network. Finally showcase extreme performance, positioning success and reputation of ex grad scheme employees.

 

These and the already many innovations in place we could all share are not just ‘good ideas’, they are practices that feed the few deep essentials that engage grad hearts and minds.

 

I you would like to discuss graduate recruitment and development further, please contact me directly on: Capp +44 (0) 2476 232 363 or Link In with me, send me an in-mail, and I’ll contact you: uk.linkedin.com/in/vernonbryce

 

Nicky Garcea, Chief Customer Officer, Capp and Vernon Bryce, Chief Commercial Officer, Capp presented ‘Engaging the Hearts and Minds of Graduates’ at the AGR Student Development Conference, 13 March 4014.

www.agr.org.uk

 

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A Battle of Wills – Strengths vs. Competencies

To find out why Nestlé prefer to use Capp’s strengths-based selection methodology, read pages 26-28 of the latest AGR Graduate Recruiter Magazine.

 

When it comes to selecting your selection methodology, the two main heavyweights in contention are competencies and strengths. While competencies have a reputation for being a tried-and-tested method that has been in use for a number of years, increasingly, a number of high profile organisations have ditched competencies in favour of a strengths-based approach. We asked a range of AGR members to explain their methodology of choice, and why their approach works for them…

 

Tom Banham, Nestlé Academy Recruitment Manager, shares his five reasons how Nestlé has benefitted from a strengths-based process… Read Pages 26-28

 

To find out how Capp can help you deliver results through strengths-based recruitment, contact Gurpal Minhas, Senior Business Psychologist, on +44 (0) 2476 323 363 or connect on LinkedIn: uk.linkedin.com/in/gurpalminhas

 

A strength is something that you do well and enjoy doing.
When using a strength, people feel authentic and energised as they deliver successful performance.

 

www.capp.co
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Capp LinkedIn 

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In Memoriam: The Strengths of Nelson Mandela

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Strengths Consultant, Capp

 

As my young children ask about the legacy of Nelson Mandela, with their schools recounting his eventful story, I begin by talking passionately about a hero, unlike any other person who will likely ever walk this Earth. My story, of course, started with strengthspotting what his Realise2 profile might have looked like.  

 

I started with his realised strengths of Mission, Moral Compass, Catalyst, Relationship Deepener and Compassion, and an Unconditionality that drove Mandela to be the architect of South Africa’s gradual transformation from racial despotism and moral turpitude, to a liberal democracy, saving his country from a bloody civil war. Becoming its first black president, steering South Africa’s journey of reflection and reconciliation into the post-apartheid era, he was probably not lacking in Counterpoint, Change Agent and Authenticity. Quite an epitaph!

 

Enduring very near primitive conditions when landing on Robben Island in 1962, his Drive, Resilience and Courage facilitated his survival in the face of the chilling words of one of the Afrikaner warders: “This is the island, and here you shall die.” His Catalyst and Compassion instilled in him a commitment to improve the amenities for all prisoners, enabling them not only to receive books and magazines, but to enrol in correspondence courses and even to take degrees.

 

But where do you end with heroes? It is almost impossible not to attribute most strengths to Mandela in view of his uncompromising Drive for Equality. He communicated this through his strengths of Spotlight, Narrator, and Explainer, by refusing to consign the crimes of the apartheid era to history, but instead initiating the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 1996. And how could we overlook the extent of his Persistence and Bounceback whilst incarcerated on Robben Island and facing the impact of his troubled personal life when others tested his loyalty.

 

So what were Mandela’s learned behaviours?  They may have included Incubator, Scribe and Listener. Although we could safely speculate that he would have employed these qualities with considerable ease, they would (in all probability) be subordinate to his innate strengths of Action, Equality and Change Agent in navigating South Africa’s transition towards democracy and freedom.

 

Perhaps we would see Gratitude as an unrealised strength since, by his own admission, in prison, he very much regretted not expressing his feelings of kinship with his fellow Soweto citizens.

 

Finally, let us not be afraid to mention that there was possibly one solitary weakness – and one shared by many of us – Adherence!

 

Mandela, as the ‘world is coming’ to your memorial service today, thank you for coming into our world.  History will be eternally grateful to you, and your legacy will live on for generations. Indeed, as one 9-year old asked: “Is he the man who brought black and white people together?”

 

This is the legacy for which you will always be remembered.

 

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Managing Change: Resilience is Fertile (with apologies to The Borg)

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

“We are the Borg.

Your biological and technological distinctiveness will be assimilated. Resistance is futile1

(Ascribed to The Borg, an alien race featured in Star Trek the Next Generation)*

 

One of my favourite lectures in my undergrad psych degree featured ‘double approach avoidance theory’ (DAAT) thanks to the genius of Kurt Lewin, in which he theorises that many decisions in life (like marriage, moving house, career planning perhaps) confront us with conflicts, In DAAT, both goals have advantages and disadvantages causing great conflict.

 

In lay terms, DAAT of course means everyone can win yet everyone can lose, very convenient I used to think , both positive and negative, similtaneous yin and yang, balance and counterbalance in each choice at the same time, everyone has their cake and eats it; or not, it seems. Brilliantly painful and yet pleasurable at the same time I thought, and so is managing change I since learned.

 

How so? Managing Change is probably up there in the one-time Top 10 of business imperatives, along with decision making in global versus local markets, make or buy manufacture, invest not invest, organic or acquisitional growth.  Even so, within the Top 10, change is vastly under-rated both in its complexity and dynamics. Change is both threat and opportunity, managing change is a conflict between sticking with the advantages of the known status quo and the potential advantages and disadvantages in the alternative. Hence, ‘double approach-avoidance theory’.

 

This has major implications for hiring promoting and positioning people in organisations. Do we choose people who embrace change or resist it? Do we decide for singularity or plurality? Those who will resist change when opportunity presents or risks the jump? The evidence is clear.

 

In managing change, opportunity and threat is ever-present, thus embracing yet resisting change is fertile, hence ‘resilience is fertile’. In recruiting for change we need the wise insight to recognise the options, their advantages and disadvantages, the courage to hold the double approach avoidance dilemma in our thoughts, yet lead our people to the vision which inspires and sustains.

 

To find out how Capp can help your organisation manage change, please contact me directly: vernon.bryce@capp.co, connect with me on LinkedIn uk.linkedin.com/in/vernonbryce or call +44 (0) 2476 323 363.

 

*Author’s note: The Borg are a fictitious alien race, unlike Star Trek which all of us know is not!

1Source: Wikipedia

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Strengths: What They Can Do For You

Posted by: Helen Dovey

 

 

We talk a lot about playing to our strengths; using strengths to achieve our goals and delegating on the basis of strengths.

 

However, the reality for many professionals is simply working longer and harder to shift an ever increasing workload.

 

How many of us actually make a conscious, deliberate decision to use our strengths?

 

We should do because the evidence of the benefits for doing so is quite remarkable.

 

At Capp we love data. We have collected data from over 1,200 people and have found that increased strengths use is associated with the following outcomes:

 

-        Resilience – our ability to take hardships in our stride

-        Engagement – our passion for what we do

-        Vitality – that feeling of being alive and energised at work

-         Mindfulness – our ability to focus on the present and not get lost amidst the stress

-        Grit – our ability to dig our heels in and keep persisting

 

Taken together, this is a powerful combination for anyone faced with a demanding workload.

 

Rather than just make the to-do list or project plan – take 5 minutes to think about how you’re going to achieve this. Which of your strengths will maximise your chances of getting this done and at the same time, increase your opportunity to experience the above benefits?

 

So there’s a lot in it for the individual – what about for the business?

 

Research shows the individual outcomes themselves are in turn linked to desirable organisational benefits. To name a few, productivity and profitability – that is, the bottom line where it really counts. Therefore, enabling employees to use their strengths more may not only increase positive individual outcomes but in turn impact other valuable organisational drivers.

 

What should your next steps be?

 

First, know your strengths. Our research was conducted using our online strengths assessment tool Realise2. Measuring the three dimensions of performance, energy and use across 60 strengths identifies for the individual whether these attributes are realised or unrealised strengths; learned behaviours or weaknesses.

 

Second, ask yourself: how am I using my realised or unrealised strengths to achieve my goals? Where can you up your strength use?

 

It’s worth taking the time to reflect. With the run up to the close of the year hotting up, why not work a bit smarter rather than harder?

 

To read our research on the benefits of strengths use, please see my recent article here in The British Psychological Society (BPS) Assessment & Development Matters, Vol 5 (No 3) Autumn 2013.  Realising our Strengths: Relationships between strengths use and positive psychological characteristics.

 

To find out more about how we can help you find the right talent:

 

Call +44 (0) 2476 323 363

 

Email capp@capp.co

 

 

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Avoiding Strengths Overplayed: Think Orchestra, Not Soloist

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Development Consultant, Capp

 

In this final blog for our dedicated Realise2 Blog Month throughout April, I turn my attention to strengths overplayed…

 

Using our strengths enables us to enjoy endless benefits such as increasing our performance, goal achievement, happiness and confidence – and the list goes on. Be honest though: have you ever overplayed one of your strengths?

 

I am sure it was with good intentions, but sometimes, we may find ourselves not knowing when to dial back on our view, ethical conduct, or the quest for something new.

 

Some of our strengths may stem from our background; it may be hard to even contemplate taking a step back as we feel we may dishonour who we are or those whom we have role-modelled. However, I know that you know it doesn’t always serve you well!

 

If we don’t take our foot off the automatic pedal sometimes, we may find our strengths lose their energy. Let me overplay my Narrator strength and give you some examples, based on the Realise2 families:-

 

Relating – My extensive experience with Realise2 tells me that we are often caught out here.  The words: “But I love reaching out and connecting with people” echo in my ear. Working with people all day can be exhausting and time out may not be easy, especially if you have a family too.

 

Why not try using your relating strengths in parallel with other strengths? So, for example, think about the power of Esteem Builder and Creativity, or Empathic Connection with Resolver. This will help you move people towards their goals rather than simply ‘relate’.

 

Being – Ummm, how can you overplay the strengths that define how you like to be? Think about what it might look like when your Moral Compass is guided so strongly; that your way is the only way, or when your Humility leaves no room to showcase your own worth?

 

My other favourite is Unconditionality. Everyone wants to obtain advice from someone who doesn’t judge them and their queue of supporters can extend long into the evening!

 

Motivating – All action and no motive? What are you driving, changing and growing towards, and whom are you going to inspire?

 

Make sure you are clear about your purpose before turning up the volume dial on your motivating strengths, as they will be focused towards something meaningful and the energy will be sustainable.

 

Communicating – It is so crucial to be able to communicate effectively with others, but often we get stuck using one style. This then becomes a little tiresome for you and others on the receiving end.

 

Have you had one too many emails from the Scribe, too many stories from the Narrator, or been a tad bored of the opinions of that person blessed with Counterpoint? Try to find a variety of ways of communicating so you can connect with others’ preferences.

 

Thinking – If you have organising strengths – for example, Planful, Order, Detail - then I am sure you deliver your work with enviable Excel spreadsheets, and on time.

 

It is worth just checking though whether occasionally the 80/20 rule or even 90/10 rule will suffice.

 

Overusing these strengths can lead you to be stifled in your career as you are too focused on the smaller things.

 

Above all, think of your strengths like an orchestra, rather than a soloist.

 

On their own they certainly deliver; but using them together creates a beautiful harmony of movement that varies in pitch and performance, allowing both the conductor and audience a more fruitful and engaging experience.

 

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As Spring Reveals Itself, So Can Your Unrealised Strengths

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Development Consultant, Capp

 

I posted a recent blog saying that unrealised strengths were like the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. I am feeling a little like that about the arrival of Spring in the UK this week – it is simply gold!

 

For those that haven’t taken Realise2 yet, and who don’t know your unrealised strengths, think about what strengths have served you well in the past but are a little dusty now. Or identify the areas for which you have energy in growing and developing.

 

As the name suggests, we are not currently using these strengths – that’s what makes them unrealised – so they may be a little harder to uncover. As such, ask others where they have seen you perform well before, or keep a diary of the things you would love to do. All of these provide clues for where your unrealised strengths might lay.

 

So, let us take a moment as we enjoy the growth of our gardens, to think also about our own growth and how best to polish the pot of gold that is our unrealised strengths.

 

  • The best place to start is by looking at the unrealised strengths in your Realise2 profile and recognising where you get an instant buzz. Which ones could you happily keep where they are (for now!) and which are you thinking, ‘Ummm, I have always wanted to…’ I confess to not getting excited about my own unrealised strength of Order, but where there is a need, it is a good friend. However, I could easily bore you all when I talk about my love of my Creativity or Optimism.

 

  • Next, think about any opportunities coming up at work where there may be a perfect opportunity to put yourself forward.  What tasks or projects could you become involved in and add a touch of inspiration for the benefit of others? Take a risk and don’t worry if your strengths are different to the others on the project team; you will be able to make a valuable difference as you introduce new qualities to the team mix.

 

  • Don’t forget about home life too. Which unrealised strengths are waiting for your hobby to begin at last? Can you use these unrealised strengths to teach the kids something new?

 

  • Do any of these unrealised strengths need a helping hand? Sometimes they can be unrealised due to a need to up-skill ourselves, or maybe more practice is required. Learn from role models and start being curious about their successes (see Jonathan and Alex’s blog on social learning). Practise their advice / what they did. Ask for feedback. It all helps in building your own experience and momentum.

 

Above all, be confident in your abilities. By using your strengths, you’re far more likely to be performing well and also from a place of happiness and passion; you just need to find the purpose and put your unrealised strengths to work.

 

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