Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

Click here to find out more about how Strengths Selector can solve your recruitment challenges...

Subscribe by Email

Enter your email address:


 Subscribe in a reader

December 2014
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Performance Management

What Graduates Want – What is their 5 per Day?

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Chief Commercial Officer, Capp.

 

Graduates are different, graduates are hungry, graduates know what they want. These are the many opinions floating around graduate recruitment and development.

 

In the AGR Student Development Conference (13 March 2014), research was presented to test out what exactly is the real data on what graduates want and need to engage their hearts, not just their brilliant minds. Also what is the smallest thing we can all do today to increase graduate engagement at work tomorrow?

 

Research shows 90% of grads feel they deserve their dream job, 80% want regular feedback from their managers, 70% want more ‘me time’ at work. There appears to be a lot of ‘me’ in the data, give me time, give me space, recognise and value me. So how does this compare with other generations of workers and indeed other Gen Y’s? The data shows less concern for customers, job security and reward than older generations, yet like Gen Y’s there are five big conditions to engage and retain them.

 

  • Recognition: more than other employees grads need very open regular feedback, being valued and very regularly is critical to them – or they will seek it elsewhere.
  • Reputation: they will work and engage with employers of high repute, more than other generations who needed / wanted job security, we have to prove our value to them.
  • Empowerment: this is about trusting grads to get on with important things – they will go the extra mile or ten for employers who give them large scope and long reach.
  • Communications: more than other employees they need more communications, they have a deep hunger to know what’s going on – so we need to feed this in specific ways.
  • Careers: it not the job they want it’s the ladder, and they want to see how older grads have really made good– like leaders who once were grads – learning from/working with them.

 

The opportunity is there for the taking, and as if to remind us what happens if we do not provide – there is a major drop, like a stone in grad engagement within a year or so of joining. Graduate engagement drops from typical highs of 70% or even 80% to lows of 50%-60% at best with all their other expectations performance and loyalty.

 

So what can be done? These opportunities are already nailed by many top grad recruiters. Whether by design, data or desirability, there are many great examples.

 

First, engage them early, pre-hire not post hire. Second, message your schemes high on regular recognition – show case studies of grads receiving internal awards from senior leaders, working with leaders, position the recognition your company is getting too, external awards for initiatives, innovation, growth, focussing on Talent for example. Third, give early responsibility, working on key senior high value projects imperative to the business yet match their strengths. Communicate within a social grad network so they learn and grow from others’ successes, so building a future social leaders network. Finally showcase extreme performance, positioning success and reputation of ex grad scheme employees.

 

These and the already many innovations in place we could all share are not just ‘good ideas’, they are practices that feed the few deep essentials that engage grad hearts and minds.

 

I you would like to discuss graduate recruitment and development further, please contact me directly on: Capp +44 (0) 2476 232 363 or Link In with me, send me an in-mail, and I’ll contact you: uk.linkedin.com/in/vernonbryce

 

Nicky Garcea, Chief Customer Officer, Capp and Vernon Bryce, Chief Commercial Officer, Capp presented ‘Engaging the Hearts and Minds of Graduates’ at the AGR Student Development Conference, 13 March 4014.

www.agr.org.uk

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Maximising performance through strengths: An illustration of strengths-based performance management

Posted by: Emma Trenier, Senior Psychologist, Capp.

 

 

If delivering performance is the number one objective for all managers, isn’t it about time that we got it right?

Amongst managers, the term ‘performance management’ can conjure up images of bureaucracy, paperwork and having ‘difficult conversations’. As occupational psychologists and HR practitioners, it is not uncommon to work with demoralised managers struggling to complete performance reviews in time for internal deadlines.

 

From experience, managers can believe that they only need to focus on ‘performance management’ through formal structures, and therefore lack the motivation to engage in the daily tasks of giving feedback, challenge and support. Despite these challenges, however, there are reliable benefits for those who get it right.

 

To read our research on the benefits and challenges of adopting a strengths-focused approach to performance management, please see my recent article here in The British Psychological Society (BPS) Assessment & Development Matters, Vol 5 (No 4) Winter 2013. Maximising performance through strengths: An illustration of strengths-based performance management.

 

To find out more about how we can help you find the right talent:

Call +44 (0) 2476 323 363

Email capp@capp.co

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Managing Change: Resilience is Fertile (with apologies to The Borg)

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

“We are the Borg.

Your biological and technological distinctiveness will be assimilated. Resistance is futile1

(Ascribed to The Borg, an alien race featured in Star Trek the Next Generation)*

 

One of my favourite lectures in my undergrad psych degree featured ‘double approach avoidance theory’ (DAAT) thanks to the genius of Kurt Lewin, in which he theorises that many decisions in life (like marriage, moving house, career planning perhaps) confront us with conflicts, In DAAT, both goals have advantages and disadvantages causing great conflict.

 

In lay terms, DAAT of course means everyone can win yet everyone can lose, very convenient I used to think , both positive and negative, similtaneous yin and yang, balance and counterbalance in each choice at the same time, everyone has their cake and eats it; or not, it seems. Brilliantly painful and yet pleasurable at the same time I thought, and so is managing change I since learned.

 

How so? Managing Change is probably up there in the one-time Top 10 of business imperatives, along with decision making in global versus local markets, make or buy manufacture, invest not invest, organic or acquisitional growth.  Even so, within the Top 10, change is vastly under-rated both in its complexity and dynamics. Change is both threat and opportunity, managing change is a conflict between sticking with the advantages of the known status quo and the potential advantages and disadvantages in the alternative. Hence, ‘double approach-avoidance theory’.

 

This has major implications for hiring promoting and positioning people in organisations. Do we choose people who embrace change or resist it? Do we decide for singularity or plurality? Those who will resist change when opportunity presents or risks the jump? The evidence is clear.

 

In managing change, opportunity and threat is ever-present, thus embracing yet resisting change is fertile, hence ‘resilience is fertile’. In recruiting for change we need the wise insight to recognise the options, their advantages and disadvantages, the courage to hold the double approach avoidance dilemma in our thoughts, yet lead our people to the vision which inspires and sustains.

 

To find out how Capp can help your organisation manage change, please contact me directly: vernon.bryce@capp.co, connect with me on LinkedIn uk.linkedin.com/in/vernonbryce or call +44 (0) 2476 323 363.

 

*Author’s note: The Borg are a fictitious alien race, unlike Star Trek which all of us know is not!

1Source: Wikipedia

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Innovations in Graduate Recruitment at The FIRM’s Winter Conference

Posted by: Gurpal Minhas, Senior Business Psychologist, Capp

 

Capp at The FIRM's Winter Conference 2013

 

Last Friday (15th November), the Capp team attended and presented at The FIRM’s Winter Conference 2013. As proud gold sponsors, it was a joy to be part of an event that drives such thought provoking and inspirational conversation and knowledge sharing.

 

“An absolute buzz for me, it was a privilege to be there’’
Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

The FIRM (Forum for In-house Recruitment Managers), is a network with over 6,300 members, it was setup as a platform for in-house recruitment managers to discuss best practice, hear innovations in the latest selection methodologies and how to source the best candidates. This in-turn enables recruitment managers to grow more efficiently, effectively and easily.

 

The fast-paced and engaging, multi-streamed day was introduced by Gary Franklin and Emma Mirrington. The opening session, hosted by Guardian Jobs, was a panel discussion exploring the definition of the future of employability; a current undergraduate student, a careers advisor (both from Leicester University) and a graduate recruiter (Mars Chocolate, UK) took to the stage. The discussion had a specific focus on:

  • The responsibility of Careers Services, Students and Employers in the development of ‘employment skills’ versus technical capability at university
  • The opportunity for students to differentiate themselves within an overpopulated workforce
  • The future of employability and the different approaches students are taking to showcase their ability.

Jutta Kremer, from Gartner, shared the role that technology plays in candidate care. Jutta showcased that across 20 recruiters they’ve selected over 1,500 employees with 35% coming via in-house through referrals.

 

Delegates also discussed different routes of reaching out to potential new candidates through LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook breaking away from traditional job boards. Simon Hallard from Lloyds Banking Group shared his leading approach in relation to creating a direct sourcing model for their banking business.

 

After lunch, Nicky Garcea, Capp Director, delivered a lively interactive and engaging session to share the latest innovations in graduate recruitment; Nicky described how trusted Capp clients such as Nestlé, Barclays and EY have embedded strengths-based assessments throughout their graduate, intern and school leaver programmes.

 

Attendees were provided with a business case of taking a strengths-based approach to recruitment and put through their paces with a mock strengths-based interview (SBI), done in pairs. As interviews were conducted, the room erupted with energy and vigour – a real practical opportunity for delegates to understand the way in which an SBI works.

 

For more information on the conference, Nicky’s presentation slides or a demonstration of the interview, please contact gurpal.minhas@capp.co or alternatively call 02476 323 363.

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Celebrating Capp’s Situational Strengths Test

Posted by: Caroline Mackinnon

 

 

Launched in 2012, we are celebrating the Situational Strengths Test (SST) one year on.

 

The SST is as an objective and reliable, high volume strengths-based sifting tool that has been taken tens of thousands of times by candidates for organisations in sectors such as the Emergency Services, FMCG, Retail and Professional Services.

 

 

We are proud of the SST for a number of reasons

 

First, the way it reliably and objectively assesses the strengths required for the role. Second, delivered through our secure and reliable technology platform, it never lets you down. Third, its unique and robust scoring mechanism ensures that you only select the best candidates.

 

But we are even more proud of the positive effect the SST has had on recruiters and candidates, helping organisations find the right people, and helping people find the right jobs.

 

We love data at Capp, and when it comes to the SST we are no different. We have been analysing our results consistently and some exciting findings have emerged.

 

 

Let’s start with recruiters


Why do they use the SST? Normally for one or both of two key reasons: they want to save time and money in an early screen and/or they want to better identify the talent in their high volume applications.

 

The SST consistently shows that the scenario for each strength differentiates between successful, unsuccessful and ‘to consider’ candidates – showing that it reliably and accurately sifts for talent, separating the best fit candidates for the role from the rest.

 

Using this super efficient tool, EY screened over 19,000 graduate applicants in 2012-13, taking only the very best-fit candidates through to the next stage.

 

“Being an online tool and providing applicants with an insight into the available role makes Capp’s Situation Strengths Test incredibly attractive and when combined with a strengths-based interview will help us identify the best graduates for the available opportunities.”

 

Stephen Isherwood, former Head of Graduate Recruitment UK and Ireland, Ernst & Young

 

 

Now for the candidates


Well we know that nearly 90% of candidates feel that the scenarios in the SST give a realistic insight into working life at an organisation.

 

Nearly two thirds feel it is more challenging than other SJTs and over 99% perceive the test as user friendly. We are pretty happy with those statistics, as are our clients!

 

We constantly make improvements and adjustments to the SST to stay ahead of the curve as thought leaders in the field of strengths assessment. We’re excited to see what next year holds and expect you are too.

 

 

To see a sample SST assessment click here

 

To find out more about how the Situational Strengths Test (SST) can help you find the right talent:

 

Call +44 (0) 2476 323 363

 

Email capp@cappeu.com

 

Or visit the Situational Strengths Test website

 

 

 

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

We’ve Recruited for Strengths. What Next?

Posted by: Emma Trenier, Senior Psychologist, & Celine Jacques, Managing Psychologist, Capp

 

So you’ve recruited round pegs for round holes, and square pegs for square holes – you should give yourself a big pat on the back! You have given your organisation the most powerful ammunition to succeed – the right people in the right roles for the business. But does the work stop there? If only!

 

As HR professionals, line managers and colleagues, you now have an ongoing responsibility to help these people maximise their potential. This could take a number of forms:

 

Ongoing Performance Management

 

On an ongoing basis, people need to be supported to understand and manage their motivations, use their strengths to reach objectives, and to minimise the impact of their weaknesses.

 

The reference to strengths, and discussion around them, should not finish when the job offer is made. Instead, weave it into onboarding, performance reviews, appraisals and day to day management conversations. Champion the use of the strengths language. Help people to take control of their own performance, and their own career.

 

Strengths-focused Career Development

 

To enable really meaningful and effective career progression, and to genuinely encourage retention, you can map strengths for roles across your organisation and then support people to understand which career pathways would suit them and play to their strengths.

 

Don’t just think about what someone is good at, consider also what energises them. Which part of your business would suit their motivational needs? Which role would really bring out the best in them?

 

Talent Pipelines that Recognise Multiple Pathways

 

Finally,  as organisations seek to promote flexibility and agility, we see an increasing focus on working cross departmentally and internationally. Take a strengths- based approach for identifying the right talent for these important roles.

 

As many organisations are familiar with developing ‘talent pools’ for the identification and development of emerging leaders, identify those people with the strengths to be future top change agents. Or innovators. Or international collaborators. In fact, whatever the business needs…

 

We would love to hear your stories on what you have done to embed a strengths-based approach after recruiting for strengths. What difference has it made to you and your organisation’s performance?

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Are You a Good Performance Manager?

Posted by: Reena Jamnadas, Consulting Psychologist, Capp

 

“People leave managers not companies” – You have more than likely heard this said before, but the statistics behind it are quite staggering.

 

A Gallup poll of more than 1 million employees concluded that the number one reason people quit their jobs is a poor manager or immediate supervisor. The results also showed that poorly managed teams are on average 50% less productive and 44% less profitable than well-managed teams.

 

The results of a recent national survey also showed that 80% of employees who were very dissatisfied with their immediate supervisor were disengaged, and that 62% of engaged employees say their manager sets a good example, compared to 25% of people who are not fully engaged.

 

What are the reasons for these dismally low levels of engaged employees?

 

People Have Changed

 

Employee expectations have changed. It’s not just Gen Y – employees everywhere and of every generation expect more: more involvement, more accountability, and more recognition. When it comes to managing their performance, employees have shifted from being passive recipients to active agents.

 

Managers have changed too. Command and control is no longer cutting it – managers are expected to guide and coach, provide balanced, constructive feedback, and inspire people to achieve great things, rather than just to enforce performance standards.

 

Reassuringly, research by CIPD shows that when managers do get it right, many good results follow:

  • 25% increase in employee performance
  • 40% higher employee engagement
  • 18% growth in customer loyalty
  • 25% decrease in employee turnover
  • In the NHS, 1090 fewer deaths per 100,000 patient admissions.

 

Is Your Organisation Managing Performance in the Right Ways?

 

So how can your organisation develop the kind of managers that engage and inspire employees?

 

Through Capp’s 2012 Ideal Manager Survey and our work with highly engaged employees, we have identified 8 core questions to help you identify whether managers in your organisation are driving high performance in the right ways:

 

1. Are managers in your organisation skilled at identifying the strengths of their team members and managing high performance through these strengths?

 

Research by the Corporate Leadership Council in 2002 revealed that when managers focus on the strengths of employees, performance is likely to increase by 36%. Whereas when they focused on their weaknesses, performance decreased by 26%.

 

2. Are managers effective at building trusting, open and two-way relationships with their direct reports?

 

Research by the CIPD in 2012 showed that trust in a line manager is more important than trust in senior leaders or the organisation during times of difficulty and change.

 

3. Do managers develop better solutions through harnessing the diversity of their teams?

 

90% of respondents to Capp’s Ideal Manager Survey disagreed that all managers should manage in the same way, and instead, would develop better outcomes through harnessing the diversity of their teams.

 

4. Do managers in your organisation lead others with a sense of meaning and purpose?

 

99% of Capp’s Ideal Manager Survey respondents rated Mission as the most important and desired strength in their managers – managers that would engage them with a compelling vision, meaning and purpose, and authenticity.

 

5. Do managers in your organisation use effective delegation in order to play to the strengths of their team members?

 

Strengths-based delegation has become known to be a manager’s core tool for translating organisational strategy first into team goals, and then into each individual’s objectives, in a way that engages and plays to each individual’s strengths.

 

6. Do managers in your organisation provide regular positive and constructive feedback to their team members?

 

When researchers investigated the drivers of high performance amongst 19,187 employees in 34 organisations, they discovered that the top driver of performance was giving fair, informal, and accurate feedback – and not waiting for the dreaded annual performance review.

 

7. Do managers in your organisation coach their team to encourage daily progress and longer term career development?

 

The evidence shows that the crux of motivation is actually day-to-day productivity, as well as being able to see a path for career progression. As such, job satisfaction typically results from being productive towards one’s day-to-day goals, as well as one’s intrinsic goals for the future.

 

8. Do your managers build resilience and manage change and uncertainty effectively?

 

Capp’s recent research with leaders nominated as being ‘wise’ across dozens of blue-chip companies revealed that employees develop change readiness, agility and resilience when their leaders and managers manage change and uncertainty effectively and with confidence.

 

We know that many people are first promoted into management for their strong “technical skills” – solid knowledge of their own business. But that’s only part of the managerial equation; everyone has his or her strengths and weaknesses. It’s worth reflecting on the way that you use these to engage your people.

 

What other skills do you think are important to engage employees for high performance? Share your thoughts using the Comment function below.

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Three Things Organisations Must Fix Before Performance Management Will Work

Posted by: Emma Trenier, Senior Psychologist, Capp

 

When we’re working with organisations to develop line manager performance management capability, we often need to tackle wider issues first.

 

Here are the three most common challenges that organisations must address in order for a renewed focus on performance management to succeed.

 

1.      Trust must trump suspicion

 

We don’t live in a trusting culture. The norm is not to trust but to establish fault and blame.

 

One organisation I recently worked with spoke of how Twitter has become a management weapon. Every time negative customer feedback is tweeted, managers go and find who is to blame - trusting the public but not trusting their teams.

 

Last year’s Where has all the trust gone? report from the CIPD describes how line managers are the first port of call for building organisational trust which is essential when employees are expected to take risks or walk into the unknown. They do this best by demonstrating their consistent ability, benevolence, integrity and predictability.

 

A performance management approach that demonstrates a lack of trust, e.g., focusing on fault finding, models a lack of transparency, will jeopardise vital trust building.

 

2.      Individuals must be working on the right things

 

Then, presuming trust prevails, for performance management to be a successful process, people must be working towards the right goals, i.e., those that best serve the purpose and mission of the organisation.

 

I take the example of Accenture’s recent Why ‘Low Risk’ Innovation is Costly report. This explains that despite technology companies’ increased funding for innovation, only 13 per cent of executives believe their companies’ innovation initiatives deliver a competitive advantage.

 

One of the main reasons is that companies focus on low risk activities such as extending existing product lines, rather than pursuing new products and breakthroughs.

 

In a situation such as this, an executive may be seen to be high performing through demonstrating the right behaviours and achieving her quarterly objectives. However, if she is working on the ‘wrong’ things (in this case ‘low risk’ innovation) then the genuine line between individual and organisational performance is broken.

 

3.      Managers must be motivated to manage

 

Finally, to bring out the best in each employee, managers must be motivated to manage performance.

 

This sounds obvious, but often while managers are competent, successful, technical experts, they are not always motivated to manage performance.

 

Capp’s 2012 Ideal Manager Survey showed that employees believed the best managers were both competent and deeply motivated to provide mission and purpose, enabling others to grow in skills and self-esteem, and taking ownership for leading their teams with humility.

 

Recruiting managers with the right strengths and supporting them to stay engaged isn’t just a nice thing to do, it’s a pre-requisite for building a high performing organisation.

 

What is your experience? What other pre-requisites do you think exist for successful performance management?

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Performance Management: There is a Better Way

Posted by: Emma Trenier, Senior Psychologist, Capp

 

With the CIPD’s latest research finding that only 20% of HR professionals believe performance management has a positive effect on results and 21% believing it doesn’t, common performance management methodologies are clearly broken.

 

This is a critical problem for the economy, the government and the taxpayer, because we all rely on effective business performance.

 

The most common reason these systems go awry is that a skewed focus on collecting faulty data leads to systems and approaches that oppose the agile, responsible, learning cultures they are supposed to be driving.

 

These systems have managers being led down the garden path of paperwork, completing review documentation once or twice a year – leaving a wake of unimpressed employees in their trail.

 

But there is hope. With Google’s People Operations reinventing the way in which data is used to make people decisions – from retention algorithms to results-focused workplace design – faulty performance data may hopefully soon be something from the past.

 

Being led by the data, we know that past performance isn’t always a good indicator of future performance, and also that the quality and warmth of the supervisor is more predictive of results than the attributes and experience of the employee.

 

Future performance is dependent on manager ability to provide clear expectations, focus on strengths development and provide quality fortnightly feedback.

 

For performance management to be fit for the future – motivating Generations Y and Z to rise up the ranks – managers need to re-engage with their role as team performance coach and start:

 

-        Collecting the right data (sales, customer satisfaction, quality) to track outcomes – you can’t easily argue with objective evidence

-        Taking responsibility for building trusting, supportive relationships and providing direction and feedback

-        Giving employees responsibility for driving their own performance and collecting ongoing performance evidence

-        Using technology to track feedback and evidence all year round, not waiting for ‘the review’

-        Enabling employees to use their strengths every day to reach their objectives and overcome performance challenges.

 

Over our next blogs, we will be talking more about our vision for performance management and how managers hold the key to unlocking strengths in their teams.

 

We hope you will join in the conversation!

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Mission: Good Management

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

Do you know what it takes to be an ideal manager? Thanks to our Ideal Manager Survey, at Capp we do. Edge magazine, from the Institute of Leadership and Management, has just published coverage of Capp’s Ideal Manager Survey, showing that:

 

“Managers need humility, a clear sense of mission and personal responsibility to succeed, according to research from Capp entitled ‘the Ideal Manager Survey’. Emma Trenier, Consulting Psychologist at Capp, explores why having a clear vision is so important…”

 

Find out more about the strengths that it takes to be an ideal manager from the full article, available at Edge Online.

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS