Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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November 2017
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Leadership

Winning through your strengths

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Strengths Consultant, Capp.

 

With the Commonwealth Games in full swing, I thought it would be great to share with you ways in which we can all be part of a winning team by using our strengths. Referring to the strengths and Strengths Families from Capp’s online strengths identification tool, Realise2, what do you bring to situations that make a winning combination?

 

Competitive: Let us start with the most obvious. You love winning and this will usually be the only acceptable option for you as it probably hurts to lose! You are used to leading and being part of a winning team.  Competitive was one of the top weaknesses in the UK in our Realise2 study so consider how can you support others and role model your talent to encourage others’ competitiveness.

 

Motivation:  What are your motivation strengths and how will these deliver your competitive goals? If you have Work Ethic or Persistence, you can put the time, energy and effort into keeping going to make sure you achieve success. If you have Drive you will push yourself to win as you love achieving the demanding goals you have set yourself. Those with a sense of Adventure will compete successfully by pushing the boundaries and achieving the impossible.

 

Thinking: If you are naturally gifted in your brainpower, what thinking strengths can help you win? You may want to come up with the newest or most creative idea in your organisation. Perhaps your Judgement helps you make winning decisions or your organisational strengths of Planful or Order make sure you get to the top of your game with the right resources and in a timely manner.

 

Relationships:  If people are your focus you might not have thought too much about winning but your skill at getting the best from people will help deliver winning targets and goals through others. If you are emotionally connected with others use this talent to pick up on clues of others strengths and weaknesses to channel their energy in the right direction. If you are the natural Connector, use your network to put the winning team or resources together.

 

Being: Some of the Being strengths are all about ‘Making a Difference’ for example, Mission, Legacy, Service and Moral Compass. By aligning your passions and values together with your goals, it won’t be long before your commitment to the task sees you outperforming others and driving teams forward positively.

 

Communication:  The key to getting others on board to deliver performance. With Narrator as a strength, your talent for storytelling and anecdotes is a powerful and convincing message to others as to why they should outperform. Perhaps you offer the Counterpoint, always looking for alternatives so you can achieve success another way if you come across challenges. The ability to use your Explainer and Scribe to avoid jargon and make sure the whole team understands their individual and team goals will be a powerful combination.

 

So, the next time you are working towards a winning goal, compete in a way that plays to your strengths and you are far more likely to maintain your engagement and get to the result you want.

 

Realise2 is the leading online strengths identification and development tool, used by 80,000+ to unlock the potential of individuals and teams.

 

To find out more about how using strengths can help your organisation find and retain the right talent, call Capp on +44(0)2476 323 363.

 

 

Follow @Capp_co on TwitterLinkedIn & Facebook.

 

 

 

 

 

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Maximising performance through strengths: An illustration of strengths-based performance management

Posted by: Emma Trenier, Senior Psychologist, Capp.

 

 

If delivering performance is the number one objective for all managers, isn’t it about time that we got it right?

Amongst managers, the term ‘performance management’ can conjure up images of bureaucracy, paperwork and having ‘difficult conversations’. As occupational psychologists and HR practitioners, it is not uncommon to work with demoralised managers struggling to complete performance reviews in time for internal deadlines.

 

From experience, managers can believe that they only need to focus on ‘performance management’ through formal structures, and therefore lack the motivation to engage in the daily tasks of giving feedback, challenge and support. Despite these challenges, however, there are reliable benefits for those who get it right.

 

To read our research on the benefits and challenges of adopting a strengths-focused approach to performance management, please see my recent article here in The British Psychological Society (BPS) Assessment & Development Matters, Vol 5 (No 4) Winter 2013. Maximising performance through strengths: An illustration of strengths-based performance management.

 

To find out more about how we can help you find the right talent:

Call +44 (0) 2476 323 363

Email capp@capp.co

 

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Your New Year’s Resolution – Give One Day

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged
by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character”

Martin Luther King Junior, 28 August 1963

 

One day you were young and people cared about you. You had dreams, ambition, hope and energy. In school, your teachers worked hard to realise your potential, teaching you things that they knew you needed to know. You probably disagreed and preferred to get back into your music, sport, seeing your friends and having a social life. Nevertheless, people around you pressed on with your development, whether parent, sibling, neighbour, gang, friend, person of worship. So you had a few breaks. You had a few setbacks too, but you cracked on, hoping that your drive, your hopes and aims would lead to something. They did.

 

Now you are older and you have made a few steps forward. You are in work. You have a career. You have options and pathways ahead of you. You get holidays. You travel. You learn. You grow. You even have days of learning and growing. You are online. The world’s web is open to you. You win.

 

Now you are older and made a few steps forward, you may wonder how the young of today are doing. Well friends, more than 430,000 young people are facing long-term unemployment in the UK. Across Europe, North Africa and the Middle East the numbers are no less, and no less worrying. A forgotten generation who wonder who will care for them, their dreams, ambitions, hopes and energy. Who will help realise their potential? Who will invest in them as others invested in you? They’re into sport, music and the people around them whether parent, sibling, neighbour, gang, friend, person of worship do care, yet no breaks.

 

‘’With more than 430,000 young people in the UK facing long-term unemployment, it is frightening to think about the young lives that could be wasted if we fail to give them the urgent support they need’’

Martina Milburn CBE, Chief Executive, The Prince’s Trust

 

Let’s imagine one day, somebody gave them a day. Just one day of their time. And it started feeding their hunger, their need to grow and succeed like you. Then another gave a day. They started to invest one day a month, offering this time to young early career people in their business, work-place and neighbourhood. The skills, knowledge and expertise were transferable and then replicable. Yet more was to come. In transferring this, those giving their time began to gain insights experiences and skills. Their work improved, their engagement and innovation improved. Transfer made a difference.

 

One day. That’s all it took. And because one day some time ago somebody invested in them, one day made a difference. Giving one day made them who they were. That one day was all it took. It mattered then to you in those days and it matters now. Imagine your one day will make a difference, one day.

 

“The statistics are terrifying – the United Nations International Labour Organisation (ILO)
estimates that close to 75 million 15-24 year olds are out of work”

Hannah Barnes, BBC News, Radio 4, 12 September 2012

 
 

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Managing Change: Resilience is Fertile (with apologies to The Borg)

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

“We are the Borg.

Your biological and technological distinctiveness will be assimilated. Resistance is futile1

(Ascribed to The Borg, an alien race featured in Star Trek the Next Generation)*

 

One of my favourite lectures in my undergrad psych degree featured ‘double approach avoidance theory’ (DAAT) thanks to the genius of Kurt Lewin, in which he theorises that many decisions in life (like marriage, moving house, career planning perhaps) confront us with conflicts, In DAAT, both goals have advantages and disadvantages causing great conflict.

 

In lay terms, DAAT of course means everyone can win yet everyone can lose, very convenient I used to think , both positive and negative, similtaneous yin and yang, balance and counterbalance in each choice at the same time, everyone has their cake and eats it; or not, it seems. Brilliantly painful and yet pleasurable at the same time I thought, and so is managing change I since learned.

 

How so? Managing Change is probably up there in the one-time Top 10 of business imperatives, along with decision making in global versus local markets, make or buy manufacture, invest not invest, organic or acquisitional growth.  Even so, within the Top 10, change is vastly under-rated both in its complexity and dynamics. Change is both threat and opportunity, managing change is a conflict between sticking with the advantages of the known status quo and the potential advantages and disadvantages in the alternative. Hence, ‘double approach-avoidance theory’.

 

This has major implications for hiring promoting and positioning people in organisations. Do we choose people who embrace change or resist it? Do we decide for singularity or plurality? Those who will resist change when opportunity presents or risks the jump? The evidence is clear.

 

In managing change, opportunity and threat is ever-present, thus embracing yet resisting change is fertile, hence ‘resilience is fertile’. In recruiting for change we need the wise insight to recognise the options, their advantages and disadvantages, the courage to hold the double approach avoidance dilemma in our thoughts, yet lead our people to the vision which inspires and sustains.

 

To find out how Capp can help your organisation manage change, please contact me directly: vernon.bryce@capp.co, connect with me on LinkedIn uk.linkedin.com/in/vernonbryce or call +44 (0) 2476 323 363.

 

*Author’s note: The Borg are a fictitious alien race, unlike Star Trek which all of us know is not!

1Source: Wikipedia

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Success is a Science

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

“Everyone can rise above their circumstances and achieve success
if they are dedicated and passionate about what they do”

(Nelson Mandela)

 

A student scanned her university’s psychology reference library shelves. They were full of outstanding studies in delinquency, depression, drug addiction, divorce, debt; many important yet curiously incomplete pictures of human behaviour. Where were the triumphs, joys, adventures, the peaks of human endeavour and success she wondered?

 

In another place and time, a first class coach in sporting team performance, unusually at the time, recorded the winning plays in his team’s games. He then replayed them to his team. Impressively, the team improved its winning performances as never before and, as they observed and learned from their winning plays, their success was sustained.

 

Both had something in common; belief that success and failure, though important, are opposite to each other only in a dictionary. Behaviourally they are not opposite. Focussing on one, in the absence of the other, is neither enlightening nor productive. In business, we are getting better at understanding this difference, the difference between failure and success in terms of turning the master keys to improving performance.

 

Consider this. Some Sales, Leadership, L&D, Grad and Recruitment specialists each ask for £10,000 from their CFO’s discretionary ‘value creation’ fund. Some teams ask for the fund to spend the money on reducing costs, some ask for spend to study failure rates. One team, rather hopefully they thought, ask the CFO for £20 000, asking her to invest in Success. To the amazement of the other teams, the ‘success study’ team won.

 

Here’s what the CFO had to say. “I have often puzzled on why in business we spend an inordinate slice of our precious time investigating why things go wrong and not investing why things go right. We can learn a lot from why customers buy from us, more than why they do not. We learn more from why our successful people stay than why they may leave. In my view it’s the successful people we have now that will make us great in future. So I had no hesitation in investing in Success’’.

 

Opportunity is there for the taking; opportunity to create sharper workforces. Let’s study success, let’s get data on its strengths, nuances, capabilities; then find how to measure success robustly, accurately and reliably. Let’s draw and develop success models. Let’s study the many positive role models out there; also their best plays, in leaders, engineers, art, teaching, healthcare research and front line professions, sales, service, retail, projects, science, technology and design.

 

Some say the “War for Talent is over; Talent won’’. Soon, people will say the “Strengths revolution is over, and Success won’’. Strengths and Success are the new kids on our block; they are more than siblings, they are twins in our quest for talent.

 

“Success is a science. If you have the conditions you get the results”

(Oscar Wilde)

 

 

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Engaging graduates to recruit the best – an EY journey

Posted By: Alex Linley, Director, Capp and Nicky Garcea, Director, Capp
 

 

Ever wondered how you can differentiate yourself as graduate recruiter? Would you like to attract and retain the best early career talent? Then you should read our latest publication in this month’s Strategic HR Review, ‘Engaging graduates to recruit the best’.

 

This article explores how strengths-based recruitment is enabling graduate recruiters to engage, attract and select the best talent and draws on the example of major graduate recruiter, Ernst & Young, to show how strengths assessment can be used.

 

This article shows how the Capp Strengths-based Recruitment Methodology and the Situational Strengths Test engages candidates by providing them with a realistic job preview of the role. They help candidates to make informed decisions about their own fit. They help organisations to select the candidates who match their requirements more effectively from those who do not, delivering better outcomes for both parties.

 

If you would like to learn more about Ernst and Young’s journey, you can view the full article here.

 

If you would like to discuss the difference that our approach is making to the engagement, attraction and selection of earlier career talent, please contact Nicky Garcea at nicky.garcea@capp.co or connect on uk.linkedin.com/in/nickygarcea

 

 

 

 

 

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Using Strengths to Recruit Talent on The Market Street: The Morrisons Journey

Posted by: Reena Jamnadas, Consulting Psychologist, Capp

 

 

In the current issue of The Graduate Recruiter, Carla Murray, Graduate Resourcing Manager at Morrisons wrote an article describing how in two years, Morrisons have gone from having minimal graduate presence to making it to The Times Top 100 Graduate Employers List  (if you missed the article, you can find it here - please note that the copyright is owned by AGR).

 

Capp have had the privilege of working closely with Morrisons to implement a strengths-based approach across their selection process, which has included a redesign of the sifting, interviewing and assessment methodology in 2013/14, resulting in a robust and consistent approach now being used across all of Morrisons’ 12 core business areas.

 

One of the most exciting shifts that Morrisons have made is to attract and recruit high performing graduates on the basis of their strengths. This includes an assessment of performance and energy/motivation for each of the strengths that candidates would need to use in order to deliver high performance as a Morrisons graduate.

 

So how exactly have we done this? Capp worked with Morrisons to deliver the following:

 

1. Strengths-based Campus Activities: Themed ‘The Market Street’, we designed innovative campus games for graduates through strengths cards enabling graduates to identify their strengths and how they might be useful across various business areas at Morrisons. It also featured an exercise enabling graduates to build their resilience in the face of setbacks, through identifying and using their strengths.

 

The aim of this was to create a differentiated, more individualised candidate attraction experience, enabling the Morrisons brand to stand out on campus. Research with previous clients show that 75% of candidates enjoyed the strengths-based process more than other recruitment processes, starting with strengths-based attraction.

 

2. Situational Strengths Test (SST): The SST is an online high volume strengths-based sifting tool that objectively and reliably assesses the strengths required for graduates at Morrisons. It presents candidates with typical scenarios that they would encounter as a Morrisons graduate and assesses how they would respond, enabling Morrisons to save time and resources by sifting only the highest quality candidates.

 

Morrisons have loved using the SST because it provides an early assessment of motivation and organisational fit, and also gives candidates a realistic job preview helping to encourage self-selection. We know that nearly 90% of candidates of previous clients also feel that the scenarios in an SST give a realistic insight into working life at an organisation. Nearly two thirds feel it is more challenging than other Situational Judgement Tests, and over 99% perceive the test as user friendly.

 

3. Strengths-based Video Interviews: Capp’s strengths-based interviews assess a candidate’s energy and motivation, as well their performance, resulting in the sifting of candidates that are likely to be highly engaged and productive at Morrisons if recruited. Through our partnership with Sonru, an asynchronous video-interviewing supplier, we designed a series of video interviews per business area for Morrisons to further screen candidates on the basis of their strengths.

 

Strengths-based video interviewing has provided Morrisons with a perfect platform for assessors to identify subtle emotional clues and body language, indicative of energy/motivation, which is reduced in a telephone interview. As well as this, Capp’s strengths-based interviews do not include probing questions that we often see in a competency interview. The strengths/video combination is therefore more naturally suited when used asynchronously. The beauty of strengths-based video interviewing is that candidates and assessors can conduct the interview at the time that suits them (within a stipulated time period).

 

4. Strengths-based Assessment Centre Interview: Capp designed a face-to-face strengths based interview for Morrisons to use at the final stage of the Assessment Centre.

 

One of the key benefits of strengths-based interviews is clear candidate differentiation of who has the strengths to succeed in the role and who doesn’t. Previous client research showed that 74% of assessors judged the strengths-based interview to better distinguish between low, average and high performers.

 

As well as strengths-based interviews being described as more enjoyable by both assessors and candidates, strengths-based interviews also elicit more honest candidate responses, delivering better assessment practice and improved selection decisions – 72% of interviewers judged the strengths-based interview to elicit less-rehearsed responses than other interview styles.

 

We simply cannot wait to see the results of Morrisons’ strengths-based graduate recruitment process this year! If you would like to keep up with ‘The Market Street’ and speak to Capp about using strengths-based assessment in your organisation, please contact me at reena.jamnadas@capp.co and uk.linkedin.com/in/reenajamnadas or call Capp on +44 (0)2476 323 363

 

 

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Strengths: What They Can Do For You

Posted by: Helen Dovey

 

 

We talk a lot about playing to our strengths; using strengths to achieve our goals and delegating on the basis of strengths.

 

However, the reality for many professionals is simply working longer and harder to shift an ever increasing workload.

 

How many of us actually make a conscious, deliberate decision to use our strengths?

 

We should do because the evidence of the benefits for doing so is quite remarkable.

 

At Capp we love data. We have collected data from over 1,200 people and have found that increased strengths use is associated with the following outcomes:

 

-        Resilience – our ability to take hardships in our stride

-        Engagement – our passion for what we do

-        Vitality – that feeling of being alive and energised at work

-         Mindfulness – our ability to focus on the present and not get lost amidst the stress

-        Grit – our ability to dig our heels in and keep persisting

 

Taken together, this is a powerful combination for anyone faced with a demanding workload.

 

Rather than just make the to-do list or project plan – take 5 minutes to think about how you’re going to achieve this. Which of your strengths will maximise your chances of getting this done and at the same time, increase your opportunity to experience the above benefits?

 

So there’s a lot in it for the individual – what about for the business?

 

Research shows the individual outcomes themselves are in turn linked to desirable organisational benefits. To name a few, productivity and profitability – that is, the bottom line where it really counts. Therefore, enabling employees to use their strengths more may not only increase positive individual outcomes but in turn impact other valuable organisational drivers.

 

What should your next steps be?

 

First, know your strengths. Our research was conducted using our online strengths assessment tool Realise2. Measuring the three dimensions of performance, energy and use across 60 strengths identifies for the individual whether these attributes are realised or unrealised strengths; learned behaviours or weaknesses.

 

Second, ask yourself: how am I using my realised or unrealised strengths to achieve my goals? Where can you up your strength use?

 

It’s worth taking the time to reflect. With the run up to the close of the year hotting up, why not work a bit smarter rather than harder?

 

To read our research on the benefits of strengths use, please see my recent article here in The British Psychological Society (BPS) Assessment & Development Matters, Vol 5 (No 3) Autumn 2013.  Realising our Strengths: Relationships between strengths use and positive psychological characteristics.

 

To find out more about how we can help you find the right talent:

 

Call +44 (0) 2476 323 363

 

Email capp@capp.co

 

 

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It’s Recruitment, but ‘Not as We Know It’

Posted by: Nicky Garcea

 

 

 

Last Thursday, 12 September, I was an invited speaker at the eArcu client event at the Grange City Hotel, London. eArcu is a 2nd generation recruitment platform provider and Capp’s chosen applicant tracking partner. The event was expertly compered by CAThr3e’s Ben Jackson. It was attended by over 50 of eArcu’s clients and fellow speakers included:

 

 

 

There was a genuine buzz at this event, with speakers and delegates enthused by the impact that technology can have in assisting the in-house recruiter to:

 

  • Recruit through multiple devices – Andy demonstrated how the eArcu responsive grid technology ensures that application sites adapt across all handheld or tablet devices. Andy highlighted how this technology has been implemented in Capp’s work with Nestlé as they seek to attract both school leavers and graduates.

 

  • Gather accurate data – Andrew shared Macmillan’s journey from outsourcing to insourcing, showing how gathering data can drive better attraction decisions, budget allocation, and stakeholder engagement. Andrew also provided a preview of the Macmillan’s new attraction video which supports the charity’s ‘you are not alone’ brand message.

 

  • Create candidate pipelines – Alastair highlighted how Ingenium People help to empower inhouse recruiters to use social media to build their own candidate pipelines. Alastair also showed how revolutionary sites such as ‘Facebook graph search’ is allowing recruiters to find people within set locations and sharing similar skills. Despite these online developments Alastair was quick also to acknowledge the importance of still picking up the phone to connect with exceptional candidates.

 

  • Create consistent candidate experiences – Damien from Daesign blew the audience away with demonstrations of ‘serious games’. Damien provided insights into how clients like EE have harnessed avatars to deliver introductions to assessment days and how Renault has delivered online sales training through their sales manager games.

 

  • Select for Strengths – My presentation demonstrated how strengths (measuring performance, energy and experience) can be assessed online through Capp’s Situational Strengths Test (SST). I provided examples of how clients like EY, Nestlé and Morrisons use the SST to provide candidates with a cost effective, realistic job preview as well as online strengths-based volume screening.  I also demonstrated the ways in which strengths can be integrated within an organisation’s capability framework and the difference between strengths and competency-based interviewing.

 

The event concluded with a panel discussion, reviewing how handheld mobile solutions for both candidates and inhouse recruiters could make attraction and recruitment accessible anytime, all the time, for all.

 

 

If you would like to know more about how Capp harnesses technology to deliver our end-to-end recruitment solutions, please contact me, nicky.garcea@capp.co

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Values-based Recruitment: Realising People’s Destiny

Posted by: Gurpal Minhas, Consulting Psychologist and Celine Floyd, Managing Psychologist, Capp

 

Mahatma Gandhi, on values:

 

 

“Your beliefs become your thoughts,
Your thoughts become your words,
Your words become your actions,
Your actions become your habits,
Your habits become your values,
Your values become your destiny.”

Mahatma Gandhi

 

 

Beliefs through to actions, values through to destiny. But if values become our destiny, what does this mean for the world of work? How can we harness this in recruitment, and assessment?

 

 

Many organisations aim to embed their core values into the recruitment process – and are keen to ensure that candidates fit with these values before making a hiring decision. Here at Capp, we partner with organisations who want to ensure they hire talent who will not only perform, but will do so in the right way – aligned to their key values. Below we reflect on this concept of values-based recruitment.

 

 

When we behave in line with our values we feel comfortable, energised and draw satisfaction from what we are doing, while if we are required to act against the grain of our values we lose energy and can become de-motivated. This carries with it considerable implications for any recruitment process. We also know that when you assess against values, you assess against the organisational culture. When you get this right and hire talent which shares your organisational values, people stay in post longer, are more engaged, and more productive.

 

 

Contrast this with competencies – we know people have the capacity to demonstrate competencies not consistent with their values; and that developing competencies is easier – one can practice over time for example. Developing values and strengths is different; values are deeply embedded for an individual, often depending on one’s background and experience, but not specific to a work environment.

 

 

Many of our clients, such as Barclays, make a clear link between their values and the strengths we empower them to assess in their talent selection process. A robust strengths-based approach provides real evidence of ‘behaviours driven by values’.  The strengths-based selection process frees candidates from being assessed only what they have done, or can do, and instead allows them to demonstrate what they really want to do – and what they really want to is live and work according to their values.

 

 

Do you recruit based on values? Are you confident that your values link to performance? Would you like us to demonstrate how we can empower your organisation to drive selection and development based on your core values? We would love to hear from you. If you would like to hear more about how Capp deliver Values-Based Recruitment please contact Gurpal.Minhas@cappeu.com

 

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