Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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November 2017
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Business

Telegraph UK STEM Awards 2014

Posted by: Nick Hayter,  Senior Psychologist, Capp

Source: Telegraph. Winner Holly Bishop (centre) with her trophy and judges Richard Gray and Rachel Riley

 

On Monday 9 June, I had the fortunate opportunity to attend the inaugural UK STEM Awards at the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). The Telegraph, in partnership with Babcock International Group hosted an excellent ceremony which celebrated the talent of our young and aspiring scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians (STEM). Launched in March, the initiative invited students to submit their ideas for tackling real-life challenges, on the condition that entries were feasible, original and beneficial to society.

 

Video presentations summarised the winning ideas in five categories, each sponsored by a prestigious employer in the industry: Pharmaceuticals, GlaxoSmithKline; Automotive, McLaren Group; Environment, Semta; Construction, Atkins; Defence, BAE Systems. The overall winner was Holly Bishop, studying at Plymouth University, for her concept of a medication reminder bracelet with a light and vibration reminder that is only deactivated by scanning the medication box, thus ensuring the medication is taken. Holly’s prize was a cheque for £25,000, as well as a bespoke mentoring programme from a senior engineer at Babcock (an amazing opportunity for self-development and career planning).

 

We were also treated to speakers from government, academia and the sponsor businesses; all were unequivocal in their passion for STEM-related studies, reminding us how crucial these subjects are in the design and production of literally everything we interact with on a daily basis.

 

In summary, the awards ceremony opened up my eyes to three main things:

 

First, it showed me how important it is to position and celebrate the sciences in schools and colleges. (Maths homework will seem a lot more worthwhile, if you know the benefits it can bring to you and society.)

Second, it confirmed that technology and engineering companies need to continue their efforts in creating roles that inspire current and future STEM-students – otherwise mass migration towards other professions will continue.

Third, I couldn’t help but think how Jobmi can benefit the students and employers that I saw at the awards, by helping to identify young people with a passion for sciences and match them to the right employers. It encourages me to know that the eventual outcome of this, enables our future scientists and engineers to improve the way we all go about our daily lives.

 

The UK STEM Awards for 2015 is already in planning – I am really looking forward to seeing the new challenges that students will take on, and hope I can attend the awards next year too! To read about the awards, see here. 

 

For further information on how Capp can help your organisation find the right talent, please call Nick Hayter on Tel +44 (0) 2476 323 363 , email nick.hayter@capp.co or Link in with me here.

 

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Capp launch the Jobmi Manifesto

 

We are proud to launch the Jobmi Manifesto today, on the opening day of National Apprenticeship Week and National Careers Week.
 

Jobmi is the employability and recruitment platform from Capp. It connects young people and employers. Young people are matched to the company’s success criteria using a range of Jobmi assessments that are free to access. Employers find candidates who are pre-screened and pre-qualified, and a fit for their culture, role and future.
 

Through the Jobmi Manifesto, we are building a stakeholder coalition to improve job prospects and recruitment practices for young people.
 

In the Jobmi Manifesto, you will see how we are working to:
 

Excite employers
Energise schools, colleges and universities
Engage young people
Enable strengths
Empower social mobility

 

Show your support for the Jobmi Manifesto here.

If you really want to help, please forward this to your colleagues and friends who want to support young people and early careers.
 

Together we will make a difference to the employability and recruitment prospects of young people.
 

Thank you
 

Capp
 

www.capp.co/

www.jobmi.com

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The Challenge of Youth Unemployment

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

John Longworth, Director General of the British Chambers of Commerce, has called on George Osborne to ensure that the 2014 budget focuses on youth unemployment. With the unemployment rate at 19.9% for 16-24 year olds, there is a lot that needs to be done.

 

That’s one in five of our young people who are out of work, missing the chance to realise their potential and develop their careers. In a developed economy such as ours in the UK, that is simply not good enough.

 

At Capp, we have taken our experience and expertise in early careers recruitment, our wide university and student connections, and our deep knowledge and capability in assessment and development. We have combined them to build Jobmi.

 

Jobmi is the employability and recruitment platform, aimed at 16-24 year olds, and providing them with routes to develop their employability and find jobs.

 

With National Apprenticeship Week next week, we will be taking the opportunity to launch the Jobmi Manifesto, setting out just what we and our partners are working together to achieve through Jobmi.

 

There’s a better way to deliver better outcomes for everybody involved in early careers recruitment. With Jobmi we’re going to show how this can be done.

 

Join Jobmi at www.jobmi.com.

 

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Your New Year’s Resolution – Give One Day

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged
by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character”

Martin Luther King Junior, 28 August 1963

 

One day you were young and people cared about you. You had dreams, ambition, hope and energy. In school, your teachers worked hard to realise your potential, teaching you things that they knew you needed to know. You probably disagreed and preferred to get back into your music, sport, seeing your friends and having a social life. Nevertheless, people around you pressed on with your development, whether parent, sibling, neighbour, gang, friend, person of worship. So you had a few breaks. You had a few setbacks too, but you cracked on, hoping that your drive, your hopes and aims would lead to something. They did.

 

Now you are older and you have made a few steps forward. You are in work. You have a career. You have options and pathways ahead of you. You get holidays. You travel. You learn. You grow. You even have days of learning and growing. You are online. The world’s web is open to you. You win.

 

Now you are older and made a few steps forward, you may wonder how the young of today are doing. Well friends, more than 430,000 young people are facing long-term unemployment in the UK. Across Europe, North Africa and the Middle East the numbers are no less, and no less worrying. A forgotten generation who wonder who will care for them, their dreams, ambitions, hopes and energy. Who will help realise their potential? Who will invest in them as others invested in you? They’re into sport, music and the people around them whether parent, sibling, neighbour, gang, friend, person of worship do care, yet no breaks.

 

‘’With more than 430,000 young people in the UK facing long-term unemployment, it is frightening to think about the young lives that could be wasted if we fail to give them the urgent support they need’’

Martina Milburn CBE, Chief Executive, The Prince’s Trust

 

Let’s imagine one day, somebody gave them a day. Just one day of their time. And it started feeding their hunger, their need to grow and succeed like you. Then another gave a day. They started to invest one day a month, offering this time to young early career people in their business, work-place and neighbourhood. The skills, knowledge and expertise were transferable and then replicable. Yet more was to come. In transferring this, those giving their time began to gain insights experiences and skills. Their work improved, their engagement and innovation improved. Transfer made a difference.

 

One day. That’s all it took. And because one day some time ago somebody invested in them, one day made a difference. Giving one day made them who they were. That one day was all it took. It mattered then to you in those days and it matters now. Imagine your one day will make a difference, one day.

 

“The statistics are terrifying – the United Nations International Labour Organisation (ILO)
estimates that close to 75 million 15-24 year olds are out of work”

Hannah Barnes, BBC News, Radio 4, 12 September 2012

 
 

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2013: The Year of ‘I Love Strengths’

Posted by: Alex Linley, Director, Capp

 

With this final Capp blog of 2013, we wanted to thank you for your readership and support throughout the year and also take the opportunity to look back over an exceptional 12 months.

 

As we reflect on 2013, it’s very clear that this really was the year of ‘I Love Strengths’. Here’s why:

 

1. We launched the ‘I Love Strengths’ campaign through our sponsorship of the AGR Annual Conference, where Nicky Garcea of Capp and Charlotte Hart of Barclays brought the house down with their presentation on strengths-based recruitment.

 

2. We started tremors that are still reverberating through the world of HR when Nicky Garcea of Capp and Fiona Miller of Nestlé presented at the CIPD Recruitment Conference.

 

3. We gave in house recruiters lots of food for thought when Nicky Garcea of Capp inspired the audience with her presentation on strengths-based recruitment at The FIRM Winter Conference.

 

Throughout all of this, the Capp team has continued to expand, our client base has continued to grow, and our reach and positive impact on the world – as measured by our PR coverage and client feedback – has also extended. Thank you for the part you have played in enabling our continued success.

 

With the festive season upon us, we also turn our attention to how we can support those less fortunate than ourselves. As well as a lot of activity we have undertaken to support local charities, we are again supporting Birmingham Children’s Hospital by being a Super Santa. To this end, we will donate all proceeds from Realise2 sales on Christmas Eve to the BCH Super Santa appeal. We’ll let you know the results in January!

 

We look forward with excitement to 2014 and what it may hold. In closing, may I take this opportunity on behalf of everyone at Capp to wish you all a very peaceful festive period and a prosperous and fulfilling New Year.

 

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A Battle of Wills – Strengths vs. Competencies

To find out why Nestlé prefer to use Capp’s strengths-based selection methodology, read pages 26-28 of the latest AGR Graduate Recruiter Magazine.

 

When it comes to selecting your selection methodology, the two main heavyweights in contention are competencies and strengths. While competencies have a reputation for being a tried-and-tested method that has been in use for a number of years, increasingly, a number of high profile organisations have ditched competencies in favour of a strengths-based approach. We asked a range of AGR members to explain their methodology of choice, and why their approach works for them…

 

Tom Banham, Nestlé Academy Recruitment Manager, shares his five reasons how Nestlé has benefitted from a strengths-based process… Read Pages 26-28

 

To find out how Capp can help you deliver results through strengths-based recruitment, contact Gurpal Minhas, Senior Business Psychologist, on +44 (0) 2476 323 363 or connect on LinkedIn: uk.linkedin.com/in/gurpalminhas

 

A strength is something that you do well and enjoy doing.
When using a strength, people feel authentic and energised as they deliver successful performance.

 

www.capp.co
Twitter
Capp LinkedIn 

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Managing Change: Resilience is Fertile (with apologies to The Borg)

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

“We are the Borg.

Your biological and technological distinctiveness will be assimilated. Resistance is futile1

(Ascribed to The Borg, an alien race featured in Star Trek the Next Generation)*

 

One of my favourite lectures in my undergrad psych degree featured ‘double approach avoidance theory’ (DAAT) thanks to the genius of Kurt Lewin, in which he theorises that many decisions in life (like marriage, moving house, career planning perhaps) confront us with conflicts, In DAAT, both goals have advantages and disadvantages causing great conflict.

 

In lay terms, DAAT of course means everyone can win yet everyone can lose, very convenient I used to think , both positive and negative, similtaneous yin and yang, balance and counterbalance in each choice at the same time, everyone has their cake and eats it; or not, it seems. Brilliantly painful and yet pleasurable at the same time I thought, and so is managing change I since learned.

 

How so? Managing Change is probably up there in the one-time Top 10 of business imperatives, along with decision making in global versus local markets, make or buy manufacture, invest not invest, organic or acquisitional growth.  Even so, within the Top 10, change is vastly under-rated both in its complexity and dynamics. Change is both threat and opportunity, managing change is a conflict between sticking with the advantages of the known status quo and the potential advantages and disadvantages in the alternative. Hence, ‘double approach-avoidance theory’.

 

This has major implications for hiring promoting and positioning people in organisations. Do we choose people who embrace change or resist it? Do we decide for singularity or plurality? Those who will resist change when opportunity presents or risks the jump? The evidence is clear.

 

In managing change, opportunity and threat is ever-present, thus embracing yet resisting change is fertile, hence ‘resilience is fertile’. In recruiting for change we need the wise insight to recognise the options, their advantages and disadvantages, the courage to hold the double approach avoidance dilemma in our thoughts, yet lead our people to the vision which inspires and sustains.

 

To find out how Capp can help your organisation manage change, please contact me directly: vernon.bryce@capp.co, connect with me on LinkedIn uk.linkedin.com/in/vernonbryce or call +44 (0) 2476 323 363.

 

*Author’s note: The Borg are a fictitious alien race, unlike Star Trek which all of us know is not!

1Source: Wikipedia

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You’re An Entrepreneur? You Must Be Mad!

Posted by: Alex Linley, Director, Capp

 

When we started Capp, we got a lot of responses along the same lines of this blog post title. Tens of thousands of strengths-based interviews and tens of thousands of completions of Realise2 later, people now take a different view. It’s always easy to see success after the event; far harder to predict it ahead of time.

 

It’s this that Global Entrepreneurship Week is all about supporting. The people who see things differently, who are prepared to take a chance, who believe in themselves and their ideas even when almost everyone else around them is doubting.

 

These perspectives are the theme of one of the best books on entrepreneurship I have read in a while. Worthless, Impossible and Stupid (by Daniel Isenberg) describes the perspectives of the people who don’t see the opportunity for the product (Worthless), who overestimate the challenge to bring it to market (Impossible), and who criticise and doubt the people who dare to think differently and give it a go (Stupid).

 

Thankfully for us all and for society as a whole, entrepreneurs fall for none of these traps. Instead, they see value where others don’t. They match their skills and strengths to the challenges and opportunities they face. And they take the right judgement calls to make it all happen to deliver success.

 

There’s a great line in Oliver Stone’s 1987 film Wall Street that sums this up brilliantly. It’s not the “Greed is good” quote for which Gordon Gekko became famous. Instead, it’s this almost throwaway line that describes the entrepreneurial process in a sentence:

 

“Money isn’t lost or made. It’s simply transferred from one perception to another.”

 

This is the entrepreneur’s gift and raison d’etre. To see inefficiencies in opportunities and markets – and to fix them. When the entrepreneur succeeds, we all benefit – by definition, since if the entrepreneur was not creating value, they would not have customers, they would not be succeeding.

 

So, especially here in Global Entrepreneurship Week, let’s raise a salute to the outliers, the weird ones, the people who see things differently.

 

But above all, here’s to the people who not only see, but do; to those who feel the risk but take it anyway.

 

Here’s to the entrepreneurs. Your country needs you!

 

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Innovations in Graduate Recruitment at The FIRM’s Winter Conference

Posted by: Gurpal Minhas, Senior Business Psychologist, Capp

 

Capp at The FIRM's Winter Conference 2013

 

Last Friday (15th November), the Capp team attended and presented at The FIRM’s Winter Conference 2013. As proud gold sponsors, it was a joy to be part of an event that drives such thought provoking and inspirational conversation and knowledge sharing.

 

“An absolute buzz for me, it was a privilege to be there’’
Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

The FIRM (Forum for In-house Recruitment Managers), is a network with over 6,300 members, it was setup as a platform for in-house recruitment managers to discuss best practice, hear innovations in the latest selection methodologies and how to source the best candidates. This in-turn enables recruitment managers to grow more efficiently, effectively and easily.

 

The fast-paced and engaging, multi-streamed day was introduced by Gary Franklin and Emma Mirrington. The opening session, hosted by Guardian Jobs, was a panel discussion exploring the definition of the future of employability; a current undergraduate student, a careers advisor (both from Leicester University) and a graduate recruiter (Mars Chocolate, UK) took to the stage. The discussion had a specific focus on:

  • The responsibility of Careers Services, Students and Employers in the development of ‘employment skills’ versus technical capability at university
  • The opportunity for students to differentiate themselves within an overpopulated workforce
  • The future of employability and the different approaches students are taking to showcase their ability.

Jutta Kremer, from Gartner, shared the role that technology plays in candidate care. Jutta showcased that across 20 recruiters they’ve selected over 1,500 employees with 35% coming via in-house through referrals.

 

Delegates also discussed different routes of reaching out to potential new candidates through LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook breaking away from traditional job boards. Simon Hallard from Lloyds Banking Group shared his leading approach in relation to creating a direct sourcing model for their banking business.

 

After lunch, Nicky Garcea, Capp Director, delivered a lively interactive and engaging session to share the latest innovations in graduate recruitment; Nicky described how trusted Capp clients such as Nestlé, Barclays and EY have embedded strengths-based assessments throughout their graduate, intern and school leaver programmes.

 

Attendees were provided with a business case of taking a strengths-based approach to recruitment and put through their paces with a mock strengths-based interview (SBI), done in pairs. As interviews were conducted, the room erupted with energy and vigour – a real practical opportunity for delegates to understand the way in which an SBI works.

 

For more information on the conference, Nicky’s presentation slides or a demonstration of the interview, please contact gurpal.minhas@capp.co or alternatively call 02476 323 363.

 

 

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Success is a Science

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

“Everyone can rise above their circumstances and achieve success
if they are dedicated and passionate about what they do”

(Nelson Mandela)

 

A student scanned her university’s psychology reference library shelves. They were full of outstanding studies in delinquency, depression, drug addiction, divorce, debt; many important yet curiously incomplete pictures of human behaviour. Where were the triumphs, joys, adventures, the peaks of human endeavour and success she wondered?

 

In another place and time, a first class coach in sporting team performance, unusually at the time, recorded the winning plays in his team’s games. He then replayed them to his team. Impressively, the team improved its winning performances as never before and, as they observed and learned from their winning plays, their success was sustained.

 

Both had something in common; belief that success and failure, though important, are opposite to each other only in a dictionary. Behaviourally they are not opposite. Focussing on one, in the absence of the other, is neither enlightening nor productive. In business, we are getting better at understanding this difference, the difference between failure and success in terms of turning the master keys to improving performance.

 

Consider this. Some Sales, Leadership, L&D, Grad and Recruitment specialists each ask for £10,000 from their CFO’s discretionary ‘value creation’ fund. Some teams ask for the fund to spend the money on reducing costs, some ask for spend to study failure rates. One team, rather hopefully they thought, ask the CFO for £20 000, asking her to invest in Success. To the amazement of the other teams, the ‘success study’ team won.

 

Here’s what the CFO had to say. “I have often puzzled on why in business we spend an inordinate slice of our precious time investigating why things go wrong and not investing why things go right. We can learn a lot from why customers buy from us, more than why they do not. We learn more from why our successful people stay than why they may leave. In my view it’s the successful people we have now that will make us great in future. So I had no hesitation in investing in Success’’.

 

Opportunity is there for the taking; opportunity to create sharper workforces. Let’s study success, let’s get data on its strengths, nuances, capabilities; then find how to measure success robustly, accurately and reliably. Let’s draw and develop success models. Let’s study the many positive role models out there; also their best plays, in leaders, engineers, art, teaching, healthcare research and front line professions, sales, service, retail, projects, science, technology and design.

 

Some say the “War for Talent is over; Talent won’’. Soon, people will say the “Strengths revolution is over, and Success won’’. Strengths and Success are the new kids on our block; they are more than siblings, they are twins in our quest for talent.

 

“Success is a science. If you have the conditions you get the results”

(Oscar Wilde)

 

 

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