Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

Click here to find out more about how Strengths Selector can solve your recruitment challenges...

Subscribe by Email

Enter your email address:


 Subscribe in a reader

Categories

  • No categories
November 2018
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Gurpal Minhas

Innovations in Graduate Recruitment at The FIRM’s Winter Conference

Posted by: Gurpal Minhas, Senior Business Psychologist, Capp

 

Capp at The FIRM's Winter Conference 2013

 

Last Friday (15th November), the Capp team attended and presented at The FIRM’s Winter Conference 2013. As proud gold sponsors, it was a joy to be part of an event that drives such thought provoking and inspirational conversation and knowledge sharing.

 

“An absolute buzz for me, it was a privilege to be there’’
Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

The FIRM (Forum for In-house Recruitment Managers), is a network with over 6,300 members, it was setup as a platform for in-house recruitment managers to discuss best practice, hear innovations in the latest selection methodologies and how to source the best candidates. This in-turn enables recruitment managers to grow more efficiently, effectively and easily.

 

The fast-paced and engaging, multi-streamed day was introduced by Gary Franklin and Emma Mirrington. The opening session, hosted by Guardian Jobs, was a panel discussion exploring the definition of the future of employability; a current undergraduate student, a careers advisor (both from Leicester University) and a graduate recruiter (Mars Chocolate, UK) took to the stage. The discussion had a specific focus on:

  • The responsibility of Careers Services, Students and Employers in the development of ‘employment skills’ versus technical capability at university
  • The opportunity for students to differentiate themselves within an overpopulated workforce
  • The future of employability and the different approaches students are taking to showcase their ability.

Jutta Kremer, from Gartner, shared the role that technology plays in candidate care. Jutta showcased that across 20 recruiters they’ve selected over 1,500 employees with 35% coming via in-house through referrals.

 

Delegates also discussed different routes of reaching out to potential new candidates through LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook breaking away from traditional job boards. Simon Hallard from Lloyds Banking Group shared his leading approach in relation to creating a direct sourcing model for their banking business.

 

After lunch, Nicky Garcea, Capp Director, delivered a lively interactive and engaging session to share the latest innovations in graduate recruitment; Nicky described how trusted Capp clients such as Nestlé, Barclays and EY have embedded strengths-based assessments throughout their graduate, intern and school leaver programmes.

 

Attendees were provided with a business case of taking a strengths-based approach to recruitment and put through their paces with a mock strengths-based interview (SBI), done in pairs. As interviews were conducted, the room erupted with energy and vigour – a real practical opportunity for delegates to understand the way in which an SBI works.

 

For more information on the conference, Nicky’s presentation slides or a demonstration of the interview, please contact gurpal.minhas@capp.co or alternatively call 02476 323 363.

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Developing your Centred, Compassion and Optimism strengths this Diwali

Posted by: Gurpal Minhas, Consulting Psychologist, Capp

 

 

This weekend (2nd/3rd November), many Hindu, Sikh and Jain followers will celebrate the festival of Diwali. Known as the Festival of Light millions of people around the globe will congregate and celebrate the triumph of good over evil.

 

For each religion, the meaning of Diwali manifests in different ways.

 

For Hindus, it’s for the return of Lord Rama and Sita after 14 years of exile into the forest. For Sikhs, it’s for the release of Guru Hargobind Dev Ji and 52 Kings incarcerated in India and for Jains, it’s for the attainment of peace.

 

Typically, lamps and small divas are left on all day and night as a symbol of auspiciousness and to ward away any negativity. Many will visit holy shrines and temples, sweet foods will be shared and fireworks will be lit to celebrate this joyous occasion.

 

So what has Diwali taught us about the development of our strengths? The great individuals that I’ve mentioned above displayed great compassion, optimism and an ability to be centred.

 

Lord Ram and Sita displayed great composure and self-assurance after being sent to the forest for 14 years; they were led back home by the candles that villagers lit for them outside their homes. They showed a great belief in truth and righteousness. Guru Hargobind felt that he could not leave the jail without the remaining 52 kings leaving with him. He displayed great optimism maintaining a positive outlook and attitude when the situation was unprecedented.

 

So as you witness and hear the fireworks this weekend, think back to the compassion that Guru Hargobind displayed- he showed a great ability to care for others. Likewise, consider Lord Ram and Sita’s ability to remain centred allowing them to stay focused and adhere to righteousness throughout the challenges they faced in the forest, holding on to faith and remaining optimistic that one day they would return.

 

If you have the strengths of Centred, Compassion and Optimism, how can you best develop and grow them?

  • Think about the occasions when you’ve felt most anchored and calm- when does this occur and what does your sense of self-assurance mean to you?
  • When you offer support, how does this work for your friends/family/colleagues? Typically, you help others feel really good about themselves too!
  • Have you noticed the impact that your optimism has on the people around you?
  • What strengths represent your ‘truth’, values and purpose? How are you using these in daily life?
  • What does ‘good’ mean to you? How does this translate into the decisions that you make for yourself, your team and your organisation?

 

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Strengths and Diversity

Posted by: Gurpal Minhas, Consulting Psychologist, Capp

 

It’s well known that the outcome of a successful selection process is closely related to having a robust, valid and fair assessment methodology. If this is the case, the organisation should have a representative and diverse workforce. But it’s not always guaranteed.

 

We often see recruiters reflecting at the end of an assessment process about the range and diversity of candidates that they have seen and selected during an assessment process. For most, the results are satisfactory but there is always an innate drive to improve on specific demographics.

 

For example, many clients we speak to wish to increase the number of BAME candidates applying for their roles. Alternatively, within the Pharma and Engineering industries, we have seen a push to increase the number of female candidates in specific graduate streams.

 

Over the past eight years we have gathered data on the ways in which a strengths-based approach to recruitment and assessment ensure a diverse range of applicants and recruits. Here are some of our findings:

  • Improves social mobility; when organisations take a strengths-based assessment approach, we can help ensure that candidates from socially and demographically diverse backgrounds are not disadvantaged on the basis of not having had past employment or access to fewer extra-curricular activities.
  • Our strengths-based interviews enable assessors to ask a broader range of questions that don’t just rely on work or education-based examples.
  • Improves gender balance; Nestlé’s female graduate intake for their technical functions grew from 22% to 57% using our strengths-based assessment approach.
  • Demonstrates no adverse impact; our strengths-based recruitment processes do not disadvantage applicants from either gender, with almost identical proportions of male and female candidates selected after the strengths-based interview proceeding to assessment centres.
  • Ensures fairness from a gender perspective; our Realise2 data suggests that there are no significant differences between the strengths of males and females. This demonstrates that organisations aren’t focusing on certain strengths that are stereotypically preferred by male or female candidates.

 

To learn more about how strengths can improve the diversity of your applicants please contact Gurpal Minhas Gurpal.minhas@cappeu.com

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Strengths-based Video Interviewing

Posted by: Gurpal Minhas, Consulting Psychologist, Capp

 

With the explosion of technology in today’s recruitment world, organisations are often spoilt for choice. It’s been a year since we introduced the Situational Strengths Test (SST) and with the introduction of gamification and avatar-based screening tools, the world of recruitment is becoming an increasingly exciting place. One of the most hotly contested debates surrounds video interviews. These interviews have increased in popularity and seem to be here to stay; today we discuss the merits of the video interview versus telephone/face-to-face interview screening.

 

Whilst most candidates provide a good reflection of themselves at telephone/face-to-face interviews, there are most certainly things that recruiters become frustrated with. These include candidate non-attendance, poor telephone line connection, interviewing clearly disengaged candidates and travel/business costs associated for interviews. To help overcome some of these challenges, strengths-based video interviews are a pragmatic and simple solution.

 

We have partnered with Sonru; an asynchronous video-interviewing supplier where candidates answer a list of questions from the recruiting organisation and the interview is recorded at a place and time that is convenient to the candidate. The recruiter then logs on at their time of choosing and scores the candidate.

 

So why are Capp clients such as Nestlé and Morrisons moving to a strengths-based video interviewing approach? We give our top 5 reasons:

 

1) Capp’s strengths-based interviews assess for a candidate’s passion and motivation rather than just what a candidate simply can do. This increases the calibre of candidates that are selected and the video-interview allows recruiters to assess for these attributes earlier in the selection process.

 

2) Strengths-based interview assessor training enables recruiters to pick up on subtle emotional clues and body language that cannot be seen in a telephone interview.

 

3) Capp’s strengths-based interviews don’t include probing questions that you often see in a competency-based interview. The strengths/video combination is therefore more naturally suited when used asynchronously.

 

4) Candidates AND Assessors can conduct the interview at the time that suits them (within a stipulated time period). This leads to increased convenience, pace and often a lower time-to-hire.

 

5) Candidate feedback about video interviewing continues to be positive and often reflects well on the hiring organisation. For more information see the Sonru whitepaper here.

 

So as you think about the next development in your recruitment process, take time to assess how strengths-based video interviews can assist you to conduct best-practice recruitment. It’ll be one method of seeing a candidate’s ability and motivation for wanting to join your organisation.

 

If you want to see how a strengths-based video interview works in practice, please contact gurpal.minhas@cappeu.com for a demonstration.

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

The Candidate’s Experience of a Strengths-based Interview (SBI)

Posted by: Gurpal Minhas, Consulting Psychologist, Capp

 

I’m travelling back on the train from an interview that I’ve had today and I thought I’d let you know how it went. Initially, I was quite surprised that I was asked to return for a face-to-face interview, considering I haven’t got any experience in this field!

 

When I received the invitation from the company, they informed me that I’d be having a SBI. I hadn’t had one of those before, but I really enjoyed it….something that you don’t normally say after an interview!

 

So, what was it like?

 

I was pleasantly surprised that the interview opened up with some ‘gentler’ questions about me. I knew that I couldn’t get these wrong! The interviewers asked me about what I enjoyed doing on an ideal day and what significant accomplishments I was proud of.

 

The questions got me thinking. It was nice to see that the company were interested in getting to know more about me.

 

The interview was different compared to others that I’ve done. The questions varied in style and were mainly short and rapid fire. I’m not sure how the 45 minutes managed to disappear so quickly!

 

I found that the interview allowed me to explore my experiences both in and outside of employment. It didn’t matter so much that I hadn’t worked in their industry before.

 

The interview enabled me to show my passion and genuine enthusiasm for their organisation and industry. I didn’t feel constrained to talking about my past work-related achievements. The interviewers let me talk about my interests and how I felt about things. I was able to give genuine responses that were true to me.

 

I answered a lot more questions today in comparison to a competency-based interview. This was good - it enabled me to share more of myself. As with all good interviews, I got to understand more about the role and the company.

 

I found that the questions were structured in such a way that I was able to understand and get a real insight into the sorts of activities that I’d be involved in. They got me really excited about the role!

 

By the end of the interview, I felt that the assessors had seen the best of me and I knew a lot more about the role. As I walked out of reception, I had a real ‘buzz’. I felt that I could gauge my performance, whereas normally I’d be left feeling rather anxious after an interview.

 

So, what will I take away from this experience?

 

The SBI enabled me to share what I was good at alongside those things that I get energy from. I was able to share more about my motivations, energy and interests than I have ever shown before in an interview.

 

I look forward to completing many more – but hopefully sat on the side of the assessor, rather than as a candidate!

 

This blog showcases the candidate experience of a strengths-based interview. If you are a large employer and would like to see a SBI virtually or face-to-face (and you can even play the role of a candidate!), please contact us at capp@cappeu.com to benefit from a free demonstration.

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

The Strengths-based Interview: An Interviewer’s Experience

Posted by: Gurpal Minhas, Consulting Psychologist, Capp

 

Wow. What a day. I’m just travelling home after conducting 8 SBIs for an experienced-hire vacancy within our recruitment function.

 

My team and I were really looking forward to running the interviews. Capp delivered  a ½ day training event  last week, but ultimately I really wanted to test the interviews on some live candidates!

 

Before we started the interviews, as I always do, I revisited the candidate’s CVs. I was a little anxious considering that on paper, some of the candidates didn’t look that strong – some only had minimal experience in our field so it was going to be interesting seeing how they would cope!

 

Instantly, all of the interviews got off on a really positive footing. As assessors, we built rapport with the candidates straight away by asking some warm-up questions like ‘What makes an ideal day for you?’

 

It was good to see the candidates become calmer, get into a more positive mindset and concentrate on what they enjoy doing and do well.

 

We moved into the interview questions – compared to our previous competency-based interviews, there were more questions. They were shorter and of a more rapid pace.

 

It was great. We had fewer typical responses of where people had led a sports team. Instead, we had more authentic and realistic examples. It really enabled us to differentiate what great looked like relative to just good.

 

I did find it difficult to restrain myself from probing to candidates on their answers. I had to trust in the methodology and it worked – Capp informed us that the questions were created and validated to ensure that the strongest candidates would provide the answers that we were looking for.

 

It was great to be able to start letting the candidate do all of the talking!

 

As we asked the questions, we noticed that the script contained more than just the typical ‘past experience’ type of questions. We had open, closed and hypothetical questions too. I didn’t miss at all the ‘tell me a time when you have….’ repetition!

 

From my years of interviewing, I’ve always found that people’s responses to past experience situations can give you a good insight into what they can do or have done.

 

But some examples I’ve heard have been really dated – last week, I heard a candidate sharing something that they did three years ago. Does it mean that they can deliver these behaviours for our organisation tomorrow?

 

What was really new to me (and the team) was being allowed to assess for body language. Capp had trained us to not only look at the candidate’s response but how the candidate delivered the response.

 

I noticed that the way that a candidate delivers their response to a question really is unique – we assessed tone, the type of language that someone uses, their authenticity and how engaged they are.

 

These factors really brought the questions to life. In many cases, we were really able to tell if someone simply could spot mistakes, or indeed whether they loved to spot mistakes!

 

So what remains of my earlier fear – that today’s candidates won’t have much experience in our industry? Well it wasn’t a problem!

 

One candidate in particular was so energised. She talked about her passion for what we do and how she can make an impact. This raw energy and motivation was something that I’ve seen and was able to objectively assess.

 

It’s such a great feeling to have total confidence in who you are selecting, with great evidence to support your decisions as well!

 

The best way to really understand what an SBI is all about, is to see it in action – and if you like; you can play the role of the assessor! If you’re a major employer, please contact us at capp@cappeu.com to benefit from a free demonstration.

 

In the meantime, look out for our next blog exploring the experience of the SBI from a candidate’s perspective…

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Strengths OR Competencies – or – Strengths AND Competencies?

Posted by: Gurpal Minhas

 

With more and more organisations adopting strengths-based recruitment, we’re often asked, “Does adopting a strengths-based approach to selection mean we have to lose our competency framework?”

 

The answer is no. Absolutely not. Or, at least, not unless you want it to. 

 

What’s the difference between a strength and a competency?

 

Strengths are the things that we do well and find energising. We may use our strengths to a greater or lesser extent – sometimes without even realising that we’re using them. In comparison, a competency typically looks to understand what somebody has done in the past, rather than what they do well and find energising. As a result, competencies risk getting ‘good enough’ rather than ‘high performing’.

 

Competencies are everyday practice

 

In many businesses, competency frameworks have been used to define the types of skills and attributes that employees are required to demonstrate. The intention of competency frameworks was that they would define high performance, consistently across the organisation. Unfortunately, that doesn’t happen often enough in practice.

 

Where the problems start

 

Despite the intention of competencies in principle, the challenges of their application in practice include:

 

  • Competence not excellence - assessing and developing employees in line with a set of company-wide competencies often leads to average behaviour rather than high performance

 

  • Competence not motivation – it’s straightforward to assess competence, but harder to assess genuine energy and motivation

 

  • All talk, no action – in order to demonstrate core competencies at interview and at work, employees learn the competency catchphrases and recite them as needed

 

  • Lack of individuality - being assessed for the same competencies across all roles means that candidates look very similar and can’t be properly differentiated

 

  • The (sometimes) unnecessary blockage of past experience – people can be penalised if they don’t have the necessary experience, even if they have the ability. As a result, competencies can miss future potential.

 

Integrating strengths with your competency framework

 

At Capp, we often integrate the benefits of strengths-based assessment and development with the competency frameworks that our clients have worked hard to develop.

 

This works by using strengths as the more specific behavioural indicators that sit under the more generic competency framework of the organisation.

 

These are some of the benefits that integrating strengths with competency frameworks delivers in practice:

 

  • Future proof – because strengths assessments aren’t constrained by what people have done before, they are ideally suited for assessing people for the future in times of change

 

  • Candidate differentiation – managers and recruiters talk about how they have really got to know the person, rather than just hearing their scripted responses

 

  • Increased granularity – strengths assessments give a level of subtlety and specificity that competencies alone just can’t reach

 

  • Efficient and effective – strengths assessments tie in to the specific requirements of the role, providing realistic job previews and avoiding generic questions that don’t predict performance

 

  • Development of shared language – employees celebrate their strengths as their personal characteristics, sharing them with pride, as distinct from the impersonal organisational language of competencies

 

  • Increased diversity – building on people’s strengths allows organisations to make the most of ‘spiky profiles’, while still ensuring that people meet the minimum requirements that are needed in the job.

 

 

Where next for your organisation with competencies and strengths?

 

If you’re considering how to integrate strengths as a way of improving your existing competency framework, start by asking yourself these three questions:

 

1. What do employees need to be energised by, as well as perform well, to meet our future organisational requirements?

 

2. Does our existing competency framework help us to differentiate high and low performers on this basis?

 

3. If not, how will the granularity and specificity of the strengths approach most help us?

 

 

Share your organisational experiences of strengths and competencies on The Capp Blog, using the Comment section below.

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

GRIT and Goal Attainment

Posted by: Gurpal Minhas

 

The result for Chelsea against Barcelona last Wednesday night (27 April 2012) hit headlines across the world. There were plaudits for the Chelsea manager on a sterling performance by his side. How did the team with 10 men reach the biggest final of their careers against a team repeatedly called “the best club side in the world”?  Some say Barcelona had a bad day at the office. Chelsea midfielder, Frank Lampard, described how his team “dug-deep and never gave up.” This form of bounceback is often seen on the sports pitch, but do HR professionals and managers working in their respective fields recognise this ability in the workplace?

 

Luthans, Youssef and Avolio (2007) found that resilience (one of the four elements of psychological capital) is a notable predictor of high performance, better satisfaction and lower absenteeism in today’s working world. Likewise, Seligman (2011) defined the theory of GRIT which relates to the combination of “very high persistence and high passion for an objective.” In Chelsea’s case, it was the consistent defending alongside the passion for wanting to reach the final.

 

So how do we develop GRIT?  Typically, these individuals aren’t discouraged by setbacks, are hard workers, finish what they start and are very diligent in their output. Are there strengths that one has to have to achieve their target regardless of situation? Could individuals with the strength of Drive (people who are self-motivated to achieve what they want from life) and Growth (people who are always look for ways to grow and develop) have an advantage to remain determined?  What strengths do you have that could help develop that persistence to achieve an objective? These are questions we are asking in a current Realise2 validation study – so watch out on The Capp Blog for our results in the future!

 

To achieve a successful outcome, there often is a particular hunger for wanting to achieve a particular goal. This hunger can be represented by having a meaning- an explicit desire to want to achieve this outcome. When twinned with GRIT, the individual forms a real positive mindset. To think about the impact that meaning can have on you, can you think of the last outcome that you’ve achieved using determination that had little or no meaning to you?

 

So, as you review your personal GRIT level, how many of your colleagues show these characteristics?

 

Here are some handy tips to watch and assist in your quest to develop a workforce with more GRIT:

  • What experiences have you/they had when they’ve survived daunting projects? Can you begin to build a bank of positive experiences that you can refer back to showcasing your potential?
  • Are individuals scarred from their last experiences? Do you have any processes in place to discuss what occurred and what strengths an individual possesses to help them bounce back from this? By developing an individual’s self-awareness, can you help them recognise their abilities?
  • Can you create/develop a greater sense of meaning around a particular project?
  • Can you highlight where projects may struggle, acknowledge that you’ll need to demonstrate some of the typical GRIT behaviours?
  • How can you use your unrealised strengths to maximise the use of particular strengths to achieve those targets? Are you aware of your learned behaviours that you’ll need to moderate? What particular things drain you?

One thing we know for sure is that people are more resilient, and experience less stress, when they are using their strengths. As such, strengths use is very likely an enabler of psychological capital, and so will help us achieving our goals and building our GRIT.

 

Reference

Luthans, F., Youssef, C. M., & Avolio, B. J. (2007) Psychological capital: Developing the human competitive edge. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS