Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

Click here to find out more about how Strengths Selector can solve your recruitment challenges...

Subscribe by Email

Enter your email address:


 Subscribe in a reader

Categories

  • No categories
July 2018
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Search Results for: helping managers focus on the positive

Managing Generation Y? What Do They Want From You as Their Manager?

Posted by: Reena Jamnadas & Emma Trenier

 

It’s pitched as a strap line on the Association of Graduate Recruiters’ (AGR) website: Attracting and retaining the cream of the nation’s graduate talent is getting harder and you need all the help you can get”. And they are absolutely right.

 

The growing research about Generation Y echoes this, where today’s younger employees are achievement-oriented and hungry for challenge and meaning in their work. As organisations compete for available talent, employers cannot ignore the needs, desires and attitudes of this emerging generation.

 

Over a four month period, 1180 people took Capp’s online Ideal Manager Survey, where employees across all ages, genders and backgrounds answered questions about whether anyone can be a good manager.

 

Fascinatingly, the results reported by younger employees revealed specific strengths that they want most in their managers. These include:

 

  • Work Ethic: Younger employees value managers who role-model working hard, putting a lot of effort into everything that they do;
  • Resolver: Solving challenging problems is a strength that younger employees feel is important for managers to demonstrate;
  • Spotlight: Managers who demonstrate a love of being the centre of other people’s attention are valued highly amongst younger employees;
  • Detail: Conscientiously focusing on the small things to ensure everything is accurate and error-free is important for managers to demonstrate to younger employees.

 

These strengths paint a picture of a Generation Y that is strongly inspired and driven by managers who work hard and make high quality contributions, showcasing their knowledge and talents, whilst all the time ensuring accuracy and high standards.

 

So as employers and managers, how can we fulfil the needs of our younger employees, and thereby retain their engagement and talent? Below are five top tips:

 

1. Be a role model of working hard, meaningfully: As the saying goes, “work hard, play hard”. Demonstrate a healthy level of work ethic towards meaningful goals. Bring employees on board and get them involved in specific strategic goals by helping them see where their best contribution lies.

 

2. Ensure you resolve challenging issues: Identify problems or challenges that may be impacting on younger employees and/or your team more widely. Support younger employees to develop confidence and autonomy to resolve challenges successfully themselves too.

 

3. Provide exposure to different audiences: Identify opportunities for raising awareness about your team’s contributions in the spirit of knowledge management.  Find opportunities for younger employees to do the same through developing new connections for them, seeking speaking opportunities, or writing about their work through emails, articles or blogs.

 

4. Exemplify high quality work: Reflect on ways in which you can use your strengths to promote quality and accuracy as a manager in all your work and interactions. In addition, if younger employees are demonstrating other positive behaviours, then encourage and affirm these.

 

5. Adopt strengths-based team working: Identify how younger employees could partner with other members of the team, so that they complement each other’s strengths on a particular task or project. This is a powerful way of collaborating.

 

So starting from today, how will you adapt your management style to inspire the talent and engagement of your younger employees?

 

Download Capp’s Performance Manager White Paper to find out more about what people want from their managers.

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

What Do Employees Want from Their Managers?

Posted by: Reena Jamnadas & Emma Trenier

 

Whatever our role or level in an organisation, we all have high expectations of our bosses. In particular, we want them to understand our strengths and preferences and tailor their approach to our needs – this came across loud and clear from the 1180 respondents in Capp’s recent Ideal Manager Survey.

 

We also place enormous value in this relationship working positively for us – a miserable, ineffective relationship with their line manager is the most common reason behind an employee’s decision to leave a company.

 

The results of Capp’s Ideal Manager Survey showed that 90% of employees disagreed that all managers should manage in the same way. This appreciation of diverse management styles was also shown in the breadth and range of strengths which employees thought were important for their managers.

 

Notwithstanding this, we see that employees most commonly want their managers to have the following strengths:

 

  • Mission: Providing a sense of meaning and purpose, always working towards a longer-term goal;

 

  • Enabler: Focused on creating the right conditions for people to grow and develop for themselves;

 

  • Personal Responsibility:  Taking ownership of their decisions and holding themselves accountable for what they do;

 

  • Humility: Happy for others to share the credit for their team’s successes;

 

  • Esteem Builder: Able to help people believe in themselves and see what they are capable of achieving.

 

Do any of these strengths surprise you? Perhaps not, as this simple profile paints a picture of a trusted individual who leads through a combination of clear vision, personal commitment and a focus on developing others.

 

How can you develop these characteristics within your management style? Here are our five top tips:

 

  • Create a sense of purpose: Understand what drives each of your team members and gives them a sense of meaning in their work. As you delegate work, help individuals to see how it relates to this wider sense of meaning. In practice: this means spending time talking about context before focusing on detail.

 

  • Role model responsibility:  If you want your team to develop their personal responsibility, choose a handful of areas in which you will actively demonstrate how you do this yourself. In practice: as well as taking responsibility yourself, take responsibility for training your team to do the same.

 

  • Share successes: Recognise the culture and climate that you want to build within your team.  If it is one of shared ownership and collaboration, then seek to share team successes in ways that credentialise others. In practice: share credit with others in a range of ways including public praise, copying senior managers into positive feedback emails, and thanking individuals one to one.

 

  • Give specific positive feedback: Think about providing positive feedback just as carefully as giving ‘constructive’ feedback. Let people know what they have done well and what you would like them to keep doing. In practice: give specific, targeted feedback, along with evidence, when you see great work.

 

  • Set your team up to succeed: Find opportunities to stretch each person in your team and provide the autonomy for them to take full ownership. In practice: identify each person’s strengths so that you align opportunities to these strengths and can be sure the opportunity will provide a positive stretch.

 

By managing in this way, you’ll be taking important to steps to delivering your employees what they want, in turn helping you to deliver the performance you need.

 

Download Capp’s Performance Manager White Paper to find out more about what people want from their managers.

 

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Three Steps to Overcoming Your Negativity Bias

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

We’re often asked at Capp how we can help managers to focus more on the positive and overcome the inherent negativity bias that exists in all of us. Indeed, this came in as a specific request following my post “Helping Managers Focus on the Positive“, so I’m pleased to take this opportunity now to share three simple things that we can all do to help us overcome our negativity bias:

 

1. Catch yourself being negative: The first and foremost trick in overcoming negativity bias is to recognise that it exists in the first place. When we appreciate this, we can start to do something about it. So learn to pause and ask yourself “Is this just my negativity bias at work again?” when you find yourself being critical about something. Recognise if there are particular activities, situations, or people that bring out this negativity bias more than others. When you catch yourself noticing this, you’ve taken the first step to being able to do something about it.

 

2. Think volume control, not on/off switch: Controlling your negativity bias isn’t about simply switching it off – after all, the negativity bias evolved in all of us because it serves an important purpose in survival. Instead of thinking about switching it off, think instead of your negativity bias as being on a volume control. You can turn it up, or you can turn it down. It will always be there for you, but maybe you don’t need to let it be there so much, or so much of the time.

 

3. Be mindful of your body state: Being mindful of your physiology will also play a surprisingly important role in how you can manage your negativity bias. If you are tired, stressed, or even just glucose-depleted, you have less willpower to be able to control your thoughts and decisions, so your negativity bias will gain the upper hand. Counter this by being mindful of how you feel in your body, and taking steps to stay in balance and in tune. When you recognise that you are tired, or stressed, or in need of increasing your blood sugar, recognise that your decisions won’t be optimal, so you will need to work even harder to make the right ones (and ideally to address the core causes of this imbalance in the first place – rest, recuperation, and glucose boosts!).

 

By following these three steps, you’ll find that you are able to gain much more control over what you think and why you think it. These steps won’t help you switch your negativity bias off (and hopefully you don’t want to!), but they will help you to use it in the right way, at the right time, and to the right amount.

 

Let us know how you get on with using these steps in practice, by sharing your Comments on The Capp Blog as below.

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Helping Managers Focus on the Positive

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

“My manager is always focusing on what I have done wrong, rather than helping me see what I can do to be better. Why is he always stuck on the negative?”

 

This is a question I have heard many times throughout my career. It is also a question I have posed to many conference audiences and organisational groups with whom I have worked. So what’s the answer?

 

First, let’s dispel some myths. We don’t focus on the negative because we are pessimists, because we work in HR, because we are Scottish, or because of the so-called British “stiff upper lip” (these are all suggestions that have been put to me by people from each of these groups). Neither is it because of the negativity of the organisational culture in which we might think we work, nor because of the apparent negativity of the news media that surround us.

 

No, the truth is that we can find ourselves – and other people – stuck on the negative because we’re human.

 

As human beings, we have evolved to pay attention to what’s wrong, to what isn’t working, to what’s broken. This “negativity bias” permeates how we think and what we pay attention to – and with good reason, for if we didn’t, we would be dead. Paying attention to the negative, to threat, to pain, has been a key part of our evolution as a species, something that we therefore carry with us still today, hard-coded into our DNA.

 

But just because we have evolved to have this negativity bias, that doesn’t mean that we have to allow it to dominate our lives.

 

Parminder Basran, who I interviewed when writing Average to A+, gives hope to us all, sharing his experience of how he learned to overcome this negativity bias:

 

Is it in everybody’s make up to look at the negative side in people? You really have to train yourself as a leader and a manager to work in this [more positive] way…A lot more often now, I catch myself slipping into focusing on the negative, on what someone hasn’t done well. But at least I have caught myself and done something about it – it bothers me to think what things would be like if I didn’t catch myself, and I guess that is a challenge that all of us will have to overcome.”

 

Parminder’s secret is that he learned how to use his negativity bias like a volume control – turning it up when he needed to, but also recognising that he could turn it right down low when he didn’t.

 

Managers are human beings, subject to the same negativity bias we all are. When we learn to treat our negativity bias like a volume control, we put ourselves back in control, rather than being at the mercy of our evolution.

 

There is a time and a place for focusing on the negative – but it certainly isn’t constant or continuous. For example, we know that human beings flourish with a 3:1 ratio of positive emotions to negative emotions, and that high performing business teams take this further, with 6:1 positive interactions to negative interactions.

 

Clearly, success comes to people who have learned to dial up and down the negativity, rather than having it as their default setting.

 

What experiences have you had in your own career and life with the negativity bias? Share your experiences on The Capp Blog using the Comment section below.

Share and Enjoy

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS