Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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January 2014
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Monthly Archives: January 2014

Getting the best from a team development session

Posted by: Trudy Bailey, Strengths Consultant

 

At Capp we are very excited to be launching our new Team Profile this week. It still contains some of our clients’ favourite features, but with some added extras we are particularly proud of, such as the Realise2 SWOT Analysis supporting the bigger picture for the team.

 

As you may know, Realise2 is our strengths identification tool, taken over 70,000 times, enabling individuals to perform better, reach their goals and find engagement in their roles. It helps people understand strengths they use often (realised strengths), those they draw on less often; (unrealised strengths), as well as areas of less energy (learned behaviours) and some good old fashioned honesty around what we don’t do well (weaknesses).

 

Working with teams’ strengths can be a powerful experience for all concerned, however, there are some key tips I want to share with you whether you are a leader, manager or facilitator of a team development session:-

  1. Be clear on your objectives: From the start, be very clear what the session goals are. Whether it is to support a change, understand roles and relationships or to drive a goal, don’t deviate from what you set out to do.
  2. Preparation: As a trusted facilitator, prepare for your session well, understanding all the team dynamics and their context. You wouldn’t expect any less from Capp, but the new Team Profile is packed with really useful data for your team. How will you drive this on the day to achieve results?
  3. Keep it simple: Don’t try to cram too much in the session and keep exercises simple. Often teams will simply relish in realising new things about each other so have confidence in your approach.  You may not need to do a great deal on the actual day itself to hear the light bulbs go off and the pins drop. Share your own strengths experiences; encourage the sharing of strengths and use the language – watch the results.
  4. Encourage ownership of data: I personally find the learned behaviours in team dynamics the most fascinating. Watching teams communicate about those things they thought were strengths in each other, and understanding how they can be relied on less (they are not as energising as strengths) is a rewarding experience. We often recognise each others’ strengths and weaknesses, but it is common to be caught out here. Support team members to know what they want to be known for in the team.
  5. Next steps: Don’t leave the room without establishing what the next steps are for everyone as an individual, but also collectively as a team. Of course, they may be very simple and often this is better as actions will be achievable, i.e. putting something on the agenda for the next meeting or displaying strengths profiles. When will the team be following up on the actions? Perhaps, delegate the actions list to the person with Personal Responsibility as a strength!

 

So, next time you are working with a team, consider how  Capp’s new Team Profile can support performance, engagement and, of course, improve communication.

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Maximising performance through strengths: An illustration of strengths-based performance management

Posted by: Emma Trenier, Senior Psychologist, Capp.

 

 

If delivering performance is the number one objective for all managers, isn’t it about time that we got it right?

Amongst managers, the term ‘performance management’ can conjure up images of bureaucracy, paperwork and having ‘difficult conversations’. As occupational psychologists and HR practitioners, it is not uncommon to work with demoralised managers struggling to complete performance reviews in time for internal deadlines.

 

From experience, managers can believe that they only need to focus on ‘performance management’ through formal structures, and therefore lack the motivation to engage in the daily tasks of giving feedback, challenge and support. Despite these challenges, however, there are reliable benefits for those who get it right.

 

To read our research on the benefits and challenges of adopting a strengths-focused approach to performance management, please see my recent article here in The British Psychological Society (BPS) Assessment & Development Matters, Vol 5 (No 4) Winter 2013. Maximising performance through strengths: An illustration of strengths-based performance management.

 

To find out more about how we can help you find the right talent:

Call +44 (0) 2476 323 363

Email capp@capp.co

 

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Your New Year’s Resolution – Give One Day

Posted by: Vernon Bryce, Director, Capp

 

“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged
by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character”

Martin Luther King Junior, 28 August 1963

 

One day you were young and people cared about you. You had dreams, ambition, hope and energy. In school, your teachers worked hard to realise your potential, teaching you things that they knew you needed to know. You probably disagreed and preferred to get back into your music, sport, seeing your friends and having a social life. Nevertheless, people around you pressed on with your development, whether parent, sibling, neighbour, gang, friend, person of worship. So you had a few breaks. You had a few setbacks too, but you cracked on, hoping that your drive, your hopes and aims would lead to something. They did.

 

Now you are older and you have made a few steps forward. You are in work. You have a career. You have options and pathways ahead of you. You get holidays. You travel. You learn. You grow. You even have days of learning and growing. You are online. The world’s web is open to you. You win.

 

Now you are older and made a few steps forward, you may wonder how the young of today are doing. Well friends, more than 430,000 young people are facing long-term unemployment in the UK. Across Europe, North Africa and the Middle East the numbers are no less, and no less worrying. A forgotten generation who wonder who will care for them, their dreams, ambitions, hopes and energy. Who will help realise their potential? Who will invest in them as others invested in you? They’re into sport, music and the people around them whether parent, sibling, neighbour, gang, friend, person of worship do care, yet no breaks.

 

‘’With more than 430,000 young people in the UK facing long-term unemployment, it is frightening to think about the young lives that could be wasted if we fail to give them the urgent support they need’’

Martina Milburn CBE, Chief Executive, The Prince’s Trust

 

Let’s imagine one day, somebody gave them a day. Just one day of their time. And it started feeding their hunger, their need to grow and succeed like you. Then another gave a day. They started to invest one day a month, offering this time to young early career people in their business, work-place and neighbourhood. The skills, knowledge and expertise were transferable and then replicable. Yet more was to come. In transferring this, those giving their time began to gain insights experiences and skills. Their work improved, their engagement and innovation improved. Transfer made a difference.

 

One day. That’s all it took. And because one day some time ago somebody invested in them, one day made a difference. Giving one day made them who they were. That one day was all it took. It mattered then to you in those days and it matters now. Imagine your one day will make a difference, one day.

 

“The statistics are terrifying – the United Nations International Labour Organisation (ILO)
estimates that close to 75 million 15-24 year olds are out of work”

Hannah Barnes, BBC News, Radio 4, 12 September 2012

 
 

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