Capp’s five-step approach to strengths-based recruitment

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September 2012
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Monthly Archives: September 2012

Realise2 – Capp’s Leading Edge Strengths Assessment and Development Tool

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

As many readers of The Capp Blog will know, Realise2 is Capp’s leading edge strengths assessment and development tool. It works by assessing 60 different strengths according to the three dimensions of performance, energy and use.

 

The results are then combined to determine where each attribute falls, into one of the four quadrants of the Realise2 4M Model, which are:

 

Realised strengths – high energy, high performance, high use

 

Unrealised strengths – high energy, high performance, lower use

 

Learned behaviours – lower energy, high performance, variable use

 

Weaknesses – lower energy, lower performance, variable use.

 

The 4 “Ms” of the Realise2 4M Model describe the advice that applies for optimal performance and development in each of these quadrants:

 

Marshal realised strengths – use them appropriately for your situation and context

 

Maximise unrealised strengths – find opportunities to use them more

 

Moderate learned behaviours – use them in moderation and only when you need to

 

Minimise weaknesses – use them as little as possible and only where necessary.

 

With over 50,000  people having now taken Realise2, here at Capp we have a wealth of experience and insight into how people use the Realise2 4M Model in practice, as well as the different strengths dynamics, interplays and combinations that come about. Most important of all, we know what these mean and the impact they have for you when it matters.

 

To share these insights and experiences with you, our loyal readers of The Capp Blog, we will be showcasing some of our most intriguing experiences and insights of Realise2 with you in an occasional series of forthcoming blogs.

 

If you’re not familiar with Realise2, you can find out more about the tool, including sample reports and purchase options, from the Realise2 website.

 

Watch this space for future insights, tips and techniques on Realise2, and let us know if you have areas of particular interest that you would like us to cover. Post your question or comment in the Comment section below.

 

 

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Student Strengths Insights and Strengths-based Graduate Recruitment

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

I was speaking earlier today at an Ernst & Young event for university careers advisers, where we showcased some of the early results from the Ernst & Young-Capp Student Strengths Survey.

 

This is a survey of 1,085 undergraduate students, randomly sampled and balanced across gender, faculty and university, drawing from the 87 universities that comprise the top three quartiles of UK universities.

 

Here is a snapshot of our findings as we shared them today – the full report will be released in the next few weeks:

 

1. Just under half (48.8%) of the students said that they knew what their strengths were.

 

2. 9 out of 10 students agreed that using your strengths was important because it would help you to be happier, more engaged at work, to achieve your goals, and to realise your potential.

 

3. As a result, 97% of students thought it was important to use their strengths at work in their future career.

 

4. So much so, it transpires, that two-thirds of students would choose an average graduate salary and the opportunity to use their strengths at work, over and above a job with a higher than average graduate salary but little opportunity to use their strengths.

 

5. And taking this further, over 85% of students wanted a premium of 30% or more above the average graduate salary, in order to induce them to take a job that would not allow them to use their strengths at work.

 

Clearly, strengths matter – both to graduates and to their prospective employers.

 

With an increasing weight of evidence showing the benefits of strengths-based recruitment, for both candidates and organisations alike, it’s hardly surprising that more and more organisations are choosing to make the move to put strengths at the heart of their selection processes.

 

In future blogs, we’ll explore more of what this means and how you can make the change.

 

We’ll also be showcasing some of the many successes Capp has achieved so far with our market-leading and award-winning strengths-based recruitment and selection processes.

 

In the meantime, if you have comments or questions about strengths-based recruitment, let us know using the Comment function below and we’ll be pleased to respond.

 

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Strengths-based Recruitment and the Differentiation of ‘Brand’ – HR Magazine

Posted by: Celine Jacques

 

How can your selection process differentiate your brand?

 

Reena Jamnadas and I recently wrote for HR Magazine about the implementation of strengths-based recruitment being not just a way of better selecting talent, but of differentiating brand.

 

Organisations leading the way in attracting top talent have recognised that the selection process in itself is an opportunity to differentiate themselves from their competitors.

 

In fact, it actually plays a major role in transforming their brand. Growing  research on Generation Y shows they are eager to learn, to gain insight and to feel recognised as individuals.

 

In this article, we share our three top tips for making sure your organisation has the competitive edge:

 

1. Identify what makes your organisation unique

 

2. Make the competition irrelevant

 

3. Develop a strengths-based recruitment process.

 

See our article in HR Magazine to read more…

 

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Distinguishing between Confidence and Arrogance – Edge Online

Posted by: Celine Jacques

 

How do you tell the difference between a confident candidate and an arrogant one?

 

Together with Emma Trenier, I recently wrote for the Institute of Leadership and Management’s Edge Online, about how candidate confidence can sometimes be arrogance in disguise.

 

In today’s job market, with more applicants for fewer jobs, we know it is harder than ever for recruiters to spot talent. The challenge of seeing what a candidate is really like in a short assessment day is not to be underestimated.

 

Capp works with thousands of job applicants each year and has found that confidence is often hidden by fake, or exaggerated, assessment behaviour. When these confident candidates start work, some real problems can occur – they are unhappy with the level of work they are given, expect fast progression and alienate their peers.

 

Strengths-based selection can help companies steer clear of the confidence trap by measuring components of confidence rather than the broad impression of it.

 

Follow the link to read more in Edge Online.

 

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Inspiring the Next Generation of Female Leaders – Financial Mail Women’s Forum

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

I’m delighted to share with you Capp Director Nicky Garcea’s latest blog for Financial Mail Women’s Forum, which is all about inspiring the next generation of female leaders:

 

“Thank goodness for the Olympic Games. Jessica Ennis, Victoria Pendleton and Rebecca Adlington are three of the most talked about members of Team GB from the London 2012 Olympic Games, and quite rightly so! Nicky Garcea, director at Capp, leading strengths-based people management consultancy, explores how our environmental surroundings, social norms and expectations create powerful but unwitting subliminal messages which have a huge impact on young women’s career aspirations, choices and subsequently their desire to become successful female leaders….”

 

To read the rest of Nicky’s blog, visit the Financial Mail Women’s Forum website.

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Five Things You Didn’t Know About Women at Work

Posted by: Alex Linley & Nicky Garcea

 

Over the last few days we have been reviewing the UN report on The World’s Women 2010: Trends and Statistics. This report is produced every five years, following the Beijing Declaration adopted in 1995 at the Fourth World Conference on Women.

 

As we’re currently running the Capp Women at Work Survey focused at the individual level (you can complete the survey here), we have also been looking at trends and statistics at the international and national policy level.

 

Here are five things you probably didn’t know about women at work:

 

1. Women’s participation in the global labour market has been steady at about 52% from 1990 through to 2010, whereas men’s participation has declined from 81% to 77%.

 

2. Women spend at least twice as much time as men on unpaid domestic work, leaving them with total work hours that are longer than men’s in all regions of the world.

 

3. Relative to their overall share of total employment, you’re significantly less likely to find a woman as a legislator, senior official or manager, and much more likely to find a woman as a clerk, sales worker or service worker.

 

4. Following from this, more than three quarters of women’s employment in most of the developed world is in the service sector – a significantly higher proportion than men’s employment, although this is increasing for both genders.

 

5. And this looks unlikely to change soon: Based on participation in tertiary (university / college) education, women are predominant in the fields of education, health and welfare, social sciences, and humanities and art, but they are significantly under-represented in science and engineering.

 

The World’s Women 2010: Trends and Statistics gives us a macro-level view of what is happening for women in the world of work and beyond.

 

If you’d like to help us understand more about what is happening for individual women at the micro-level, please join us in completing the Capp Women at Work Survey. In this survey, we are interested in understanding more about why as a woman you do what you do at work, your achievements, your career progression and role models, the advice you may need, your learning and the legacy you would want to see for other women.

 

As a thank you to all the women who complete the Women at Work Survey, we will enter you into our prize draw for an iPad 3 or three runner up prizes of a Spa Day. We will also give all our respondents a sneak preview of our findings and results before they are published more widely.

 

We’re keen to collect responses from as diverse a working female population as possible – so we invite and encourage you to pass on this invitation to your female colleagues, friends and family as widely as possible. Thank you – we appreciate it!

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Update from The Strengths Project, Kolkata, India – August 2012

Posted by: Avirupa Bhaduri & Alex Linley

 

This month Avirupa brings us updates for how the weather has been affecting the people of Shiriti slum in the month of August, combined with the excitement of preparing for the annual exhibition, where the Shiriti Women’s Sewing Co-operative will showcase their products:

 

“Erratic weather finally took it’s toll in August. Inconsistent rain, high humidity and hot sun coupled with the dirt accumulation in our city resulted in a number of tropical diseases transmitted by mosquito, the most threatening being dengue fever. It has affected more that thousands, with the official death count at 5. It is serious enough to be considered as epidemic.

 

The mood at Shiriti is sombre, the women are worried about their children. I bring a ray of good news; the annual exhibition of a reputed Govt. aided women and child welfare organisation was scheduled for 3 days in September, 10th to 12th. I had asked one of my aunts, who is a freelance social worker, to book us a table. However the cost of one full table came to Rs.1500, but we have only Rs. 800 in our common fund. So I thought of inviting a cousin to share half a table to sell home-made snacks. That brought down our investment cost to Rs. 750.

 

Smiling faces greet me and we soon get busy discussing what needs to be done to spruce up our humble collection. Robert had donated some fancy ribbons, buttons and sequins which were lying idle all these while. Mousumi had the bright idea of using them to make our batch of baby pinafores look pretty. The petticoats were our prized items, but even they need to be washed and ironed, as they have become dusty and lost the sheen of newness.

 

In the second week, we were delighted to see Sharmila back resplendent with vermillion and “shankha-pola” (a pair of white and red bangles, traditional symbols of hindu married woman) she happily joined our planing process offering valuable suggestions off and on. The women took home the entire collection in parts, each making an entry in the register for the number of clothes that she would be responsible for. The plan was to share the load of washing, so that each woman will be comfortable washing a few clothes with their own laundry.

 

The next week Mousumi was ready with her chore but none of the others could complete. So we decided to give one more week for washing following which the primping work would start. On 23rd August all but Arpita were ready with freshly washed and ironed clothes, so we sat down to decide on design ideas. The cut and fit of most of the clothes were fine, we left it to Sharmila to put the lace on baby suits. The energy and excitement was palpable, finally our much awaited exhibition looked like a reality.

 

In the last week we gathered together to finalize who will share which responsibility especially about time, since someone from our group need to be present at the venue at all time during the work hours for 3 days. This was cause for much debate, and it remained unresolved, but we were confident that we will somehow find a workable solution in the end.”   

 

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Do You Want to Be Happier?

Posted by: Alex Linley

 

There’s a lot of focus in the media on how people can become happier, and here at Capp we’re doing our bit as well.

 

Working with one of our big-name clients, we’re trialling a series of different happiness actions to see the impact they have on happiness.

 

If you’d like to take part and see what works for you – which will take around 15 minutes for you to complete – please join us here.

 

Full instructions are provided online, and we will send a £10 amazon.co.uk voucher to all participants who complete the survey and activities.

 

Thank you – and please feel free to share this post. The more people who take part, the merrier – literally!

 

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The Women at Work Survey

Posted by: Alex Linley & Nicky Garcea

 

Following on from Female Leaders Month on The Capp Blog, in August we launched Capp’s Women at Work Survey – and if you’re a working woman, we’d love to invite your participation. You can still access the Women at Work Survey here.

 

We are interested in understanding more about why as a woman you do what you do at work, your achievements, your career progression and role models, the advice you may need, your learning and the legacy you would want to see for other women.

 

As a thank you to all the women who complete the Women at Work Survey, we will enter you into our prize draw for an iPad 3 or three runner up prizes of a Spa Day. We will also give all our respondents a sneak preview of our findings and results before they are published more widely.

 

Thank you – we’re keen to collect responses from as diverse a working female population as possible – so please pass on this invitation to your female colleagues, friends and family as widely as possible.

 

We appreciate it!

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Update from The Strengths Project, Kolkata, India – July 2012

Posted by: Avirupa Bhaduri & Alex Linley

 

As regular readers of The Capp Blog will know, for a number of years through our charitable arm, The Strengths Project, Capp has supported the establishment and running of a Women’s Sewing Co-operative in Shiriti slum, Kolkata, India. The Women’s Sewing Co-operative was formed through strengthspotting and identifying the women’s strengths, then harnessing these strengths to improve their life circumstances. The project is supported by Avirupa Bhaduri, Capp’s consultant in Kolkata.

 

In her update for the month of July, Avirupa tells us about the impact of the lack of rain in the monsoon season, together with the implications for the Women’s Sewing Co-operative of both a price rise in the cost of a reel of cotton and the impact of the upcoming wedding for one of the senior members of the Co-operative…

 

“July is officially height of monsoon, but this year the south west monsoon winds have been very unpredictable. There was hardly any rain in June and if the first week of July was any indication, then India is about to face serious crisis in terms of rainfall. We were discussing the impact of so less rain for crops, in our first meeting. It is interesting to note that somehow, although Sharmila, Mousumi, Shyama, Arpita and others have lived all their lives in the slums of the city, they seem inexorably drawn towards village.

 

The discussion turned to the steep price hike that has hit us hard in recent times. We were discussing how a reel of thread which six months back cost Rs.3 have become dearer by Rs.2. Therefore the women agreed that it is imperative that we scout for work now, as we will be able to offer cheap labour cost, and it will be a relief for the women if they can add a little extra money to support their family income. We promised each other that we will each think about a strategy for getting work by the next week’s meeting.

 

But on 12th a surprise awaited me. As I approached the group Sharmila shyly announced that the date of her wedding was finalized for 29th. All of us congratulated her; she was indeed the best of the group; sincere, hard working, talented and efficient. I was apprehensive about what it will mean for our group, whether she will be able to be part of us after marriage. But Sharmila confidently assured that her husband lives in the same community, which means she won’t migrate to a different part of the city. She also said that she had known the boy for a long time, he is very supportive of her every endeavor, and in fact always encourages her about being part of The Strengths Project. I felt happy at the pride she feels about her role with TSP. We only discussed Sharmila & her marriage in that meeting.

 

The next Thursday Sharmila was busy with pre-wedding preparation so she was absent. The rest of us discussed the possibility of generation of work, but the only idea that kept recurring was to have an exhibition…somehow. The boys of the local club have not summoned us, so the pressure to garner money for donation was not there immediately. But all of us really wanted to showcase our work to the world. Sensing their strong desire, I once again resolved to do something, however small, about the exhibition. Our meeting for the following week was adjourned for the occasion of Sharmila’s wedding. It gave me some time to explore options and speculate about how to arrange the elusive exhibition.”

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